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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy is saying her primary opponent would "set us back 60 years" if elected, a claim her critics contend is stoking fears about whether challenger Gregg Bernstein's anti-crime policies would target black residents. The Democratic contest pits Jessamy, an incumbent who fought for civil rights in the South, against a white lawyer promising to get tougher on crime. Jessamy has been promoting and defending her efforts to weave intervention and treatment into her office's traditional role of prosecuting criminals.
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NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
In a new "community newsletter" published by her office, Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy excoriates the mayor in a three-page commentary, claiming he has pushed "failed" reforms and starved her overburdened office of funding. She also accuses The Sun of inaccurate reporting and unfair editorials about her and her office. Jessamy says the newsletter is meant to educate city residents about what her office is doing, but some people wonder whether Jessamy, who intends to run for re-election next year, is improperly using public money for political purposes.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2010
Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III has taken down the campaign signs that prompted accusations of impropriety from State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy, but some officials continued to criticize his actions as they rallied behind the prosecutor. Bealefeld's yard signs for attorney Gregg Bernstein were taken down Monday, before Jessamy's news conference Tuesday in which she questioned the police commissioner's integrity and called for a probe of whether he was politicking while on the job. In an e-mail sent from his private account — as well as in brief remarks at an event promoting the seizure of marijuana plants — Bealefeld said fighting crime was his priority.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Gady Epstein and Sarah Koenig and Gady Epstein,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
Calling the city state's attorney's attack on him "silly" and her understanding of her own budget "incomplete," Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley said yesterday that he would rather Patricia C. Jessamy concentrate on fighting crime. O'Malley was responding to reporters' questions about a recent "community newsletter" Jessamy's office produced that included a long, critical commentary of the mayor signed by her. About 28,000 copies of the newsletter were distributed as an insert in the Baltimore Afro-American newspaper, and mailed to groups, churches, hospitals and elsewhere.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 1, 2002
AND NOW, IT'S Patricia Jessamy's turn. You've already heard from Baltimore state's attorney candidates Lisa Stancil and Anton Keating in this space. Today, the incumbent Jessamy gets her chance at bat and the opportunity to tell voters why she should remain in office. "I've probably got more to tell you because I've done more," Jessamy said as she sat in her office last week. She then went on to list what she believes are her office's accomplishments. "It was an archaic system when I took over" in 1995, Jessamy said.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
To counter a wave of verbal attacks against the prosecutor's office, the chief spokeswoman for State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy lambasted Baltimore's mayor yesterday in a caustic statement that accused Martin O'Malley of "hoodwinking" the public and "failing miserably" to reduce crime. "Today our office is drawing a line in the sand that it will not stand idly by while the mayor and the police continue to delude the public with the fact that things are better because from our vantage point they are not," said Margaret T. Burns, who called a news conference to criticize the mayor.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1998
In the increasingly unpredictable world of the 1998 elections, here's one sure bet: Patricia C. Jessamy will remain in office as Baltimore's top prosecutor.That's because no one signed up by Monday night's filing deadline to oppose Jessamy in either the Democratic primary or November's general election.Jessamy -- a longtime deputy who was appointed city state's attorney in 1995 after her boss got a high-level state job -- said she was "very pleased" to have a clear path in her first election.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 23, 2001
A proposal to establish a special unit in the state's attorney's office to prosecute police officers accused of criminal misconduct has not been made final, city officials said yesterday. State's Attorney Patricia C. Jessamy has not signed a memorandum - which she formulated and police drafted - outlining how the ethics unit would be set up and operated. Jessamy's office did not respond to interview requests yesterday. The tentative agreement was reached this week, in the wake of Mayor Martin O'Malley's becoming irate because Jessamy dropped corruption charges against a city officer accused of planting evidence on an innocent man. It also follows a call by Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris for Assistant State's Attorney Elizabeth A. Ritter to step down from police cases, after she called a radio talk show using her middle name and attacked his department.
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