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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2003
JERUSALEM - Ahead of a meeting next week with President Bush, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon set a hard line yesterday on retaining Israeli settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Sharon dismissed as not "on the horizon" any talk of changing Israel's settlement policy, and he dismissed suggestions that the Bush administration was pressing him to dismantle settlements. During a visit here over the weekend, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said that he raised the issue of settlements with Sharon, and that Bush would pursue the matter when he sees Sharon on Tuesday.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
About 800 journalists from an estimated 70 countries will be converging on Annapolis for today's Middle East conference. While many regard the conference with a jaundiced eye, few appear ready to write off the one-day gathering altogether. "We're treating this as a major event, giving it at least four pages in Tuesday's edition and possibly more in Wednesday's paper," Amir Mizroch, news editor for The Jerusalem Post, wrote in an e-mail from Jerusalem yesterday. "It's the first meeting of its kind in quite a while, and the fact that Israelis will be in the same room as Syrians and Saudis is important."
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
About 800 journalists from an estimated 70 countries will be converging on Annapolis for today's Middle East conference. While many regard the conference with a jaundiced eye, few appear ready to write off the one-day gathering altogether. "We're treating this as a major event, giving it at least four pages in Tuesday's edition and possibly more in Wednesday's paper," Amir Mizroch, news editor for The Jerusalem Post, wrote in an e-mail from Jerusalem yesterday. "It's the first meeting of its kind in quite a while, and the fact that Israelis will be in the same room as Syrians and Saudis is important."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2006
JERUSALEM --Israel's acting prime minister, Ehud Olmert, said that if his Kadima Party wins national elections this month, he would seek to set Israel's permanent borders by 2010 and that the boundary would run along or close to Israel's separation barrier in the West Bank. Olmert also said he planned to develop Israel's largest settlement, Maale Adumim, which would eventually be linked with nearby East Jerusalem - a move the Palestinians vehemently oppose. The United States has also objected to this plan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2006
JERUSALEM --Israel's acting prime minister, Ehud Olmert, said that if his Kadima Party wins national elections this month, he would seek to set Israel's permanent borders by 2010 and that the boundary would run along or close to Israel's separation barrier in the West Bank. Olmert also said he planned to develop Israel's largest settlement, Maale Adumim, which would eventually be linked with nearby East Jerusalem - a move the Palestinians vehemently oppose. The United States has also objected to this plan.
SPORTS
By CHRISTIAN EWELL and CHRISTIAN EWELL,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
Former Maryland guard John Gilchrist has signed a contract with Maccabi Rishon Letzion, an Israeli professional team, according to the Jerusalem Post. Gilchrist, 21, is expected to help a team that couldn't advance past the first round in the Israeli Premier League championships. The 6-foot-3 point guard averaged 13.9 points and 5.5 assists for the Terrapins as a junior in 2004-05, when the team fell short of the NCAA tournament. Passed over in the NBA draft, he played with the Cleveland Cavaliers for the Las Vegas Summer League in July, but the team declined to sign him for the preseason.
NEWS
April 16, 1997
Andrew Meisels, 64, a novelist and veteran journalist who brought to life the epic of war and peace in the Mideast for New York Daily News readers, died hours after becoming ill Monday at his Tel Aviv, Israel, home, his family said yesterday. The cause of death was not immediately known.Mr. Meisels, who was born in Budapest, Hungary, immigrated with his family in 1939 to the Bronx, N.Y. They later moved to Manhattan, where he attended City College.In the late 1950s, he joined the Associated Press and worked in New Jersey.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2006
JERUSALEM -- On the eve of Israel's parliamentary elections, the large lead held by Kadima, the centrist party founded by Ariel Sharon before he was felled by a stroke, appeared to be eroding, final public opinion surveys indicated. Kadima was still expected to win the biggest share of seats in the 120-member Knesset in today's vote, but a smaller-than-hoped-for margin of victory would complicate efforts to assemble a stable governing coalition. The vote pits Kadima, led by acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, against the left-leaning Labor Party and the conservative Likud, led respectively by Amir Peretz and former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
NEWS
February 7, 2011
The article in The Baltimore Sun, "For Israel, change could be unsettling" (Feb. 5), accurately describes the trepidation the only democracy in the Middle East feels, in light of the recent tumultuous uprisings that have surrounded it. However, part of the reason for that "unsettling" feeling might be because while most of the world heard about Tunisia's revolution, few are aware, as The Jerusalem Post reported, that unidentified assailants set...
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | February 17, 2001
JERUSALEM - One day after defeated Prime Minister Ehud Barak agreed to join Ariel Sharon's government as defense minister, he awoke to anger and cynicism from analysts and politicians yesterday for having backtracked on his resignation from politics. "It's outrageous what he's done," said Naomi Chazan, deputy speaker of Israel's parliament, the Knesset, and a member of the progressive Meretz Party. "The sheer gall and arrogance, for him to think that things cannot go on without him." Chazan's party has refused to join the new government, which Sharon and Barak spent all week attempting to piece together.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 14, 2003
JERUSALEM - Ahead of a meeting next week with President Bush, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon set a hard line yesterday on retaining Israeli settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Sharon dismissed as not "on the horizon" any talk of changing Israel's settlement policy, and he dismissed suggestions that the Bush administration was pressing him to dismantle settlements. During a visit here over the weekend, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said that he raised the issue of settlements with Sharon, and that Bush would pursue the matter when he sees Sharon on Tuesday.
NEWS
April 22, 1997
THE WAR OF WORDS between the ruling Likud coalition and the opposition Labor Party regarding government corruption is not over. But unless Israel's Supreme Court unexpectedly overturns the prosecutors' decision not to indict Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister's worst crisis seems to be over. His ability to keep his coalition together strengthens that assessment.This is bad news for the Labor Party's Shimon Peres, who has never quite gotten over his narrow loss to Mr. Netanyahu nearly a year ago. He has been smelling blood since a January report that a lawyer with close ties to the prime minister, Roni Bar-On, had been appointed attorney general so as to secure a plea bargain for one of Mr. Netanyahu's political allies, who was facing corruption charges.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 2005
JERUSALEM - Israel has bowed to the United States and frozen a much-criticized plan to add 3,500 new housing units near a large West Bank settlement called Maale Adumim, according to Ehud Olmert, a close ally of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his vice prime minister. But Olmert's comments, made in an interview published yesterday in The Jerusalem Post, were more an indication of political repositioning in Israel's heated right-wing political competition than any enunciation of new policy.
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