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Lorraine Mirabella | February 5, 2014
The seemingly endless battle of the suit sellers - Jos. A. Bank Clothiers and Men's Wearhouse - caught the attention of Jerry Seinfeld, and the comedian is  fascinated and amused. The former Seinfeld star and co-creator was asked about the huge merger fight between the nation's two biggest men's apparel chains during a CBS interview Tuesday. "Jos. A. Bank - could they advertise more? Could they sell less?" Seinfeld said on BuzzFeed Brews on CBS This Morning. "They're just like, 'We'll give you three suits for $8. We'll give you… Just take it. Just take it, and get it out of here.'" Men's Wearhouse, the bigger of the two rivals, took an equal amount of ribbing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITC | October 31, 2002
Finally: Proof that Jerry Seinfeld is not all about nothing. Turns out he's about practicing hard and working the room and sweating the details and making it look a hundred times easier than it really is. Nothing, you'll recall, was the mantra of Seinfeld's eponymous NBC sitcom, a nine-year celebration of the off-kilter that was, in the oft-repeated words of its creator, all about nothing. But nothing was so funny. And Seinfeld - the comic and the series - made it look effortless. Nothing, it appeared, was easy.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | February 5, 2014
The seemingly endless battle of the suit sellers - Jos. A. Bank Clothiers and Men's Wearhouse - caught the attention of Jerry Seinfeld, and the comedian is  fascinated and amused. The former Seinfeld star and co-creator was asked about the huge merger fight between the nation's two biggest men's apparel chains during a CBS interview Tuesday. "Jos. A. Bank - could they advertise more? Could they sell less?" Seinfeld said on BuzzFeed Brews on CBS This Morning. "They're just like, 'We'll give you three suits for $8. We'll give you… Just take it. Just take it, and get it out of here.'" Men's Wearhouse, the bigger of the two rivals, took an equal amount of ribbing.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 2, 2007
Genuine silliness is so rare a quality these days that it shouldn't go undervalued, even in a sweet little nothing of a picture like Bee Movie. Jerry Seinfeld's foray into feature animation will delight young kids and leave their elders alternately amused and bemused. I usually resent the way studios pack advance screenings with members of a picture's target audience, but I was thankful to see Bee Movie with a bunch of kids out on a school night. It's one film that gains in entertainment value from the audible enjoyment of the first-graders sitting around you. Bee Movie (DreamWorks)
NEWS
By Michael Gray | January 4, 1998
So, do you believe that "Seinfeld" news?No, not the fact that the Four Horsemen of Neuroticness - Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer - are finally riding off into the sunset after this season. That probably should have happened a couple of seasons ago, before the show stopped being really funny.No, I'm talking about the fact that the NBC brass - the same geniuses who sent Letterman packing a few years back - proudly announced that they were ready to pay Jerry Seinfeld $5 million per episode to crank out one more season of shows about nothing.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 24, 1994
Happy Thanksgiving. Here's a turkey of a joke to get things started. What's the difference between a turkey with two wings and a turkey with one wing? A matter of a pinion. Now, let's begin.* "Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade" (9 a.m.-noon, Channel 2) -- Last week on "Seinfeld," Jerry Seinfeld accidentally popped a Macy's balloon of Woody Woodpecker. He wouldn't do that in real life, Woody? Tune in and see -- and see, in the country's best Thanksgiving Parade, some new balloons, including some from the stable of Dr. Seuss.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 26, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- Jerry Seinfeld was asked yesterday what he thought about the wave of stand-up comedians getting their own sitcoms."I'm against it," he said. "I think it should be all Shakespearean actors doing sitcoms."But there's nothing new about it. Abbott and Costello did it. Every comedian that's been used in television, they try to create a show around him. So, there's nothing new about it."Seinfeld met with critics here yesterday to promote "Abbott & Costello Meet Jerry Seinfeld," a retrospective of clips from the classic comedy team with Seinfeld as host, which will air on NBC in November.
FEATURES
By Bob Hiaasen and Bob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | December 16, 1993
If we had to do the holiday shopping for some of TV's most popular characters, what would we get?* Detective Andy Sipowicz of "NYPD Blue": Long-sleeved, pinpoint Oxford dress shirts from Lands End.* Detective John Kelly, "NYPD Blue": Boxer shorts -- because we're tired of seeing your backside. Well, some of us are tired of it.* Maggie O'Connell, "Northern Exposure": Although she never would admit it, Maggie would go goo-goo over Robert James Waller's "Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend."* Dr. Joel Fleischman, "Northern Exposure": Maggie, while high on Waller.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | August 21, 2009
David Copperfield sued for sexual assault A Seattle woman has sued magician David Copperfield, contending he sexually assaulted and threatened her while she was a guest on his private island in the Bahamas. Copperfield's lawyers, Angelo Calfo and Patty Eakes, deny the allegations and say the lawsuit is "extortion for money, plain and simple." No criminal charges have been filed. The Seattle Times describes the woman as a 22-year-old fashion model and former Miss Washington USA contestant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 14, 2011
In a special guest appearance on "The Daily Show," legendary comedian Jerry Seinfeld had some help for Jon Stewart.  Stewart, you see, was trying to overcome his more juvenile self -- which wanted to accuse GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann's husband, Marcus, of hypocritically being gay as he tried to "pray the gay" out of people.  As evidence, Stewart played a clip of Marcus Bachmann swing-dancing with Michele and also a...
NEWS
By From Sun news services | August 21, 2009
David Copperfield sued for sexual assault A Seattle woman has sued magician David Copperfield, contending he sexually assaulted and threatened her while she was a guest on his private island in the Bahamas. Copperfield's lawyers, Angelo Calfo and Patty Eakes, deny the allegations and say the lawsuit is "extortion for money, plain and simple." No criminal charges have been filed. The Seattle Times describes the woman as a 22-year-old fashion model and former Miss Washington USA contestant.
NEWS
By Michelle Quinn and Michelle Quinn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 23, 2008
The reviews are in on Microsoft's newest TV ads, which began airing Thursday night. Taking on Apple's "I'm a Mac. I'm a PC," campaign, in which the PC looks out of touch and clumsy, the Microsoft ads include celebrities such as Eva Longoria Parker and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, plus numerous Microsoft employees and regular people. With the refrain, "I'm a PC," each person adds something about themselves: I'm a PC, and I wear glasses. I'm a PC, and my name is Roger. The upshot: All kinds of human beings use PCs. My favorite is writer Deepak Chopra's, "I'm a PC and a human being.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 2, 2007
Genuine silliness is so rare a quality these days that it shouldn't go undervalued, even in a sweet little nothing of a picture like Bee Movie. Jerry Seinfeld's foray into feature animation will delight young kids and leave their elders alternately amused and bemused. I usually resent the way studios pack advance screenings with members of a picture's target audience, but I was thankful to see Bee Movie with a bunch of kids out on a school night. It's one film that gains in entertainment value from the audible enjoyment of the first-graders sitting around you. Bee Movie (DreamWorks)
NEWS
December 12, 2006
MARTIN NODELL, 91 Illustrator Martin Nodell, an illustrator who helped invent two iconic characters - the comic book superhero Green Lantern and baker's hero the Pillsbury Doughboy - died Saturday at a hospice near Waukesha, Wis. He was one of the few surviving artists from the Golden Age of comic books. It was a subway ride in Manhattan that inspired Green Lantern. En route to his Brooklyn home in 1940, Mr. Nodell noticed a trainman waving a lantern along the darkened tracks. He coupled the imagery with a magic ring - akin to Wagner's Ring Cycle, which also inspired The Lord of the Rings - and the hero was born.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITC | October 31, 2002
Finally: Proof that Jerry Seinfeld is not all about nothing. Turns out he's about practicing hard and working the room and sweating the details and making it look a hundred times easier than it really is. Nothing, you'll recall, was the mantra of Seinfeld's eponymous NBC sitcom, a nine-year celebration of the off-kilter that was, in the oft-repeated words of its creator, all about nothing. But nothing was so funny. And Seinfeld - the comic and the series - made it look effortless. Nothing, it appeared, was easy.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
People . . . People who need forks are the yuckiest people in the world.OK, so Barbra Streisand didn't exactly sing those lyrics during her recent concerts at the USAir Arena in Landover. She might as well have.The culinary word on America's Funny Girl is that she eats salad sans utensils, drinks only American bottled water and avoids green peppers because of a food allergy.Other than that, Ms. Streisand has been a poster girl for the Food Pyramid in recent days, eating lots of vegetables, fresh fruit and fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 10, 2002
DO YOU need a good laugh? We mean a big laugh. Not a mild chuckle or a little tee-hee, but a full-out, gut-busting, knee-slapping, side-splitting, tears-in-your-eyes, complete-loss-of-all-bodily-functions laugh. If that's what you really need, then check out the new Improv Comedy Club that opened its doors at the Power Plant Live! in Baltimore just two weeks ago. It joins four other comedy clubs in the Baltimore area and a sister club in Washington. What sets the Improv apart from the other clubs in town is the level of talent of the comics.
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