Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJerry Pinkney
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Pinkney

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
Jerry Pinkney's ornate book illustrations reflect his vision of the world: a rainbow of races, generations and experiences from which he draws inspiration. Since 1964, the award-winning illustrator has enchanted people in 13 countries and 10 languages with his lush watercolor-and-pencil depictions of fables and folk tales, forgotten histories and family memories. Pinkney, 61, was the featured speaker for the Baltimore County Public Library's Great Book Celebration on Tuesday, packing a meeting room at the Randallstown library and keeping 100 children up past their bedtimes with a behind-the-scenes look at tales such as "The Ugly Duckling" and "Sam and the Tigers."
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
November 11, 2007
Have A Brandywine Christmas beginning the day after Thanksgiving at the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pa. The celebration includes displays of an O-gauge model-train setup, a Victorian dollhouse and holiday trees, as well as an exhibit of Jerry Pinkney's watercolor illustrations titled Jerry Pinkney: Aesop's Fables and Other Tales. His art gives life to such fables as The Tortoise and the Hare and The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing. Returning to the celebration is Ann Wyeth McCoy's collection of dolls dressed in children's, antique and costume clothing.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
November 11, 2007
Have A Brandywine Christmas beginning the day after Thanksgiving at the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pa. The celebration includes displays of an O-gauge model-train setup, a Victorian dollhouse and holiday trees, as well as an exhibit of Jerry Pinkney's watercolor illustrations titled Jerry Pinkney: Aesop's Fables and Other Tales. His art gives life to such fables as The Tortoise and the Hare and The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing. Returning to the celebration is Ann Wyeth McCoy's collection of dolls dressed in children's, antique and costume clothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARY HARRIS RUSSELL | December 4, 2005
Klondike Gold Alice Provensen Simon & Schuster. Ages 7-10. There was more than one gold rush in 19th century North America, and this book is written as the record of one Bill Howell, who takes off from Boston in 1896 to head for the Yukon River. The Canadian government required anyone who was crossing into the Northwest Territories to bring a year's supply of food, medicine, clothing and tools. Bring and carry. Feel the heft of it: 800 pounds of flour and 300 pounds of bacon, just for starters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARY HARRIS RUSSELL | December 4, 2005
Klondike Gold Alice Provensen Simon & Schuster. Ages 7-10. There was more than one gold rush in 19th century North America, and this book is written as the record of one Bill Howell, who takes off from Boston in 1896 to head for the Yukon River. The Canadian government required anyone who was crossing into the Northwest Territories to bring a year's supply of food, medicine, clothing and tools. Bring and carry. Feel the heft of it: 800 pounds of flour and 300 pounds of bacon, just for starters.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
Jerry Pinkney paints rabbits dressed in frock-tail coats and eggs which talk and children who dance the cakewalk and plot to tame the wind. He paints about the power of living the fanciful as much as the factual, about perceiving the world as a complicated web which captures the most astonishing things.His delicate watercolor illustrations mine the fabric of fables, the rhythms of land and animals, the details of simple wishes.Acknowledged as one of the top illustrators of children's books in the world, Mr. Pinkney will spend a week working with students at the Maryland Institute, College of Art as part of the college's annual Art Litho Communicator-in-Residence program.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1990
WHEN IT comes to books, people can be divided into three categories: Folks who invest in hardcover editions, folks who buy paperbacks and folks who check out library books.I grew up in a library family, and I still think that's the best way tgo. There are times, however, when buying books makes sense. Hardbacks are fantastic holiday gifts for kids. And paperbacks are practical. When your child discovers library books she adores, you can often find the paperback versions at Junior Editions in Columbia Mall or The Children's Bookstore in Roland Park (737 Deepdene Road)
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
If the thought of yet another reconnaissance mission through the jammed aisles of a toy store fills you with dread, buy books as gifts instead. They're more durable than Barbie's Magical Motorhome, easier to wrap than a Nintendo Super Scope 6 and require no assembly, batteries or instant lines of credit.* For the preschool crowd, there are board book versions of "Carl Goes Shopping," "Carl's Christmas" and "Carl's Afternoon in the Park" by Alexandra Day (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $5.95 each, ages 2 and up)
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | February 20, 1991
MANY SCHOOL systems across the country have finally caught on, celebrating February as Black History Month and using it as a chance to teach many aspects of African-American culture.The benefits for black children are obvious: Their self-esteem grows in proportion to their sense of ethnic pride.But what about white students? My old college roommate teaches at a high school in one of the poorer counties of West Virginia. There are no black students, and little effort is made to include books about blacks in the curriculum.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | December 17, 1994
Parents of the '90s -- at least those who tend toward trends -- are buying their children retro-presents, the Erector Sets and Easy-Bake Ovens of their '60s youth.The same holds true for their choice in children's books. "Where the Wild Things Are," Dr. Seuss, "Eloise" and Laura Ingalls Wilder never go out of style. Sticking to the classics, however, means missing out on a mother lode of wonderful new books.So before snapping up that copy of "Horton Hatches the Egg" to wrap for a loved one, thumb through some of this year's releases.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
Jerry Pinkney's ornate book illustrations reflect his vision of the world: a rainbow of races, generations and experiences from which he draws inspiration. Since 1964, the award-winning illustrator has enchanted people in 13 countries and 10 languages with his lush watercolor-and-pencil depictions of fables and folk tales, forgotten histories and family memories. Pinkney, 61, was the featured speaker for the Baltimore County Public Library's Great Book Celebration on Tuesday, packing a meeting room at the Randallstown library and keeping 100 children up past their bedtimes with a behind-the-scenes look at tales such as "The Ugly Duckling" and "Sam and the Tigers."
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Sun Staff Writer | December 17, 1994
Parents of the '90s -- at least those who tend toward trends -- are buying their children retro-presents, the Erector Sets and Easy-Bake Ovens of their '60s youth.The same holds true for their choice in children's books. "Where the Wild Things Are," Dr. Seuss, "Eloise" and Laura Ingalls Wilder never go out of style. Sticking to the classics, however, means missing out on a mother lode of wonderful new books.So before snapping up that copy of "Horton Hatches the Egg" to wrap for a loved one, thumb through some of this year's releases.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham Glassman and Molly Dunham Glassman,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
If the thought of yet another reconnaissance mission through the jammed aisles of a toy store fills you with dread, buy books as gifts instead. They're more durable than Barbie's Magical Motorhome, easier to wrap than a Nintendo Super Scope 6 and require no assembly, batteries or instant lines of credit.* For the preschool crowd, there are board book versions of "Carl Goes Shopping," "Carl's Christmas" and "Carl's Afternoon in the Park" by Alexandra Day (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $5.95 each, ages 2 and up)
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | November 14, 1992
Jerry Pinkney paints rabbits dressed in frock-tail coats and eggs which talk and children who dance the cakewalk and plot to tame the wind. He paints about the power of living the fanciful as much as the factual, about perceiving the world as a complicated web which captures the most astonishing things.His delicate watercolor illustrations mine the fabric of fables, the rhythms of land and animals, the details of simple wishes.Acknowledged as one of the top illustrators of children's books in the world, Mr. Pinkney will spend a week working with students at the Maryland Institute, College of Art as part of the college's annual Art Litho Communicator-in-Residence program.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | February 20, 1991
MANY SCHOOL systems across the country have finally caught on, celebrating February as Black History Month and using it as a chance to teach many aspects of African-American culture.The benefits for black children are obvious: Their self-esteem grows in proportion to their sense of ethnic pride.But what about white students? My old college roommate teaches at a high school in one of the poorer counties of West Virginia. There are no black students, and little effort is made to include books about blacks in the curriculum.
FEATURES
By Molly Dunham and Molly Dunham,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1990
WHEN IT comes to books, people can be divided into three categories: Folks who invest in hardcover editions, folks who buy paperbacks and folks who check out library books.I grew up in a library family, and I still think that's the best way tgo. There are times, however, when buying books makes sense. Hardbacks are fantastic holiday gifts for kids. And paperbacks are practical. When your child discovers library books she adores, you can often find the paperback versions at Junior Editions in Columbia Mall or The Children's Bookstore in Roland Park (737 Deepdene Road)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | March 29, 2001
Award winner talks about book illustration Jerry Pinkney, an award-winning children's-book illustrator (four times a Caldecott Honor medalist), will be at the Randallstown Branch Library Tuesday to sign copies of his books and give a presentation. Pinkney will explain the process of creating artwork for books, which he's been doing since 1964. He's illustrated more than 75 books, many of which carry multicultural themes. He's also worked for a variety of other clients, including the U.S. Postal Service (he designed stamps for the Black Heritage Series)
NEWS
By Lyn Backe and Lyn Backe,Special to the Sun | September 18, 1995
The birth of sidewalk cafes in Annapolis triggers some wonderful memories from earlier travels, and some shudders as well. I love the leisurely pace that a sidewalk cafe implies, and the interest in what's going on outside one's own tight sphere. Some of the best meals I've ever eaten were at sidewalk cafes -- and some of the most expensive.They also have their drawbacks. I was never particularly fond of the edge imparted to my meals by diesel fumes, or the flies that wanted to share the baklava.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.