Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJerry Falwell
IN THE NEWS

Jerry Falwell

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 19, 1992
LYNCHBURG, Va. -- As the Rev. Jerry Falwell makes his appearance this week at the Republican National Convention, the future of the college he founded to promote the ideals of the religious right is in some doubt.Mr. Falwell, the fundamentalist Baptist preacher and televangelist, opened Liberty Baptist College in 1971 in Lynchburg in central Virginia. The college, now Liberty University, was to be an extension of his ministry, Thomas Road Baptist Church, with the stated purpose of "training young champions for Christ for world evangelization."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2011
I enjoyed reading Steven Grossman's recent op-ed in which he cleverly pointed out the absurdity of anti-science, creationist-thinking public figures who have a propensity for blaming natural disasters on political enemies ("Hurricane Irene: an almighty wind?" Sept.1). For example, big spending government, gays, lesbians and pro-choice folks were among those who, through the years, have been accused by elected officials (Rep. Michele Bachmann) or televangelists (Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, etc.)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 16, 2007
The Rev. Jerry Falwell, the conservative televangelist and founder of the Moral Majority, died yesterday afternoon at a Lynchburg, Va., hospital after being found unconscious and without a pulse in his office at Liberty University. Mr. Falwell, who gained national stature for galvanizing conservative Christians into political action during the 1980s, was 73 and had suffered from a heart condition. The Chicago Tribune interviewed him May 1 at his office in a little stone cottage on the campus of Liberty University, which he founded in 1971 and which has 9,600 students on campus.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | June 2, 2007
WASHINGTON -- How would Jesus vote? For many white, evangelical Christians, the answer has long been clear: Opposition to abortion and gay rights has unified religious conservatives behind Republican candidates. But new developments, both in politics and in churches, are testing that relationship. Dissatisfaction with the Republican presidential field, an expanding evangelical agenda and Democratic outreach are threatening the cohesion of a bloc widely credited with making George W. Bush president.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2004
Like many Division I college basketball players, Larry Blair's day starts early and ends late. It, however, is everything in between that makes his collegiate experience different than most of his opponents'. There are religious convocations that he must attend and daily prayer sessions that mark the beginning and end of each class and most basketball practices. There are dress restrictions to abide by - no blue jeans outside the dorms - and a strict code of conduct to follow. Alcohol is prohibited on campus and so is cursing, fraternizing with the opposite sex inside dorms and staying out past midnight on weekdays.
NEWS
By George Neff Lucas | May 17, 1994
The incumbent plus fourchiefs of state,The formers who stillaren't the late,Came to bury a peer$ With a shifty careerNow reincarnated as great.With spell-checker goingfull blast,Dan Quayle demonizesthe pastIn a book taking aim# At who was to blameFor his downfall: an! all-star miscast.Jerry Falwell's OldGossipel showClaims the Clintons havejust got to go;Watergate they outdo,# Iran-contra, too --See his new forty-buck video!See Annapolis slipping awayAs Bentley votes nay after nayOn laws that make sense;And she's not on thefence --Loves guns, hates theChesapeake Bay.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
I enjoyed reading Steven Grossman's recent op-ed in which he cleverly pointed out the absurdity of anti-science, creationist-thinking public figures who have a propensity for blaming natural disasters on political enemies ("Hurricane Irene: an almighty wind?" Sept.1). For example, big spending government, gays, lesbians and pro-choice folks were among those who, through the years, have been accused by elected officials (Rep. Michele Bachmann) or televangelists (Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, etc.)
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | May 20, 2007
Bloggers opened up on the Rev. Jerry Falwell immediately after news broke that he had died last week at age 73 of an apparent heart attack. Opinions were everywhere, and most veered to the extreme. Wonkette had a field day. "Praise God, Jerry Falwell is dead," announced the headline on one of three Falwell posts on the site. "At a time like this, people deserve sympathy and good wishes ... except for Falwell, who is an evil sonofab----," the site wrote in its first Falwell post of the day. "Over his long career as a vile televangelist building an empire of bigotry from the donations of poor people, Falwell has supported South African apartheid, called AIDS an invention of Jesus to punish gays, attacked Martin Luther King and U.S. civil rights, and blamed 9/11 on feminists and homosexuals."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 20, 2007
A few words about the Rev. Jerry Falwell's finest hour. Some would say his life did not produce many such hours but, rather, a surfeit of regrettable ones. Like in 1958, when he preached that God meant for black Americans to serve white ones. Like in 1985, when he offered warm support to the apartheid government of South Africa and denounced Bishop Desmond Tutu as a "phony." Like in 1999, when he published an article warning parents that Tinky Winky of the toddlers' show Teletubbies was gay. Like in 2001, when he blamed abortion providers, gay rights proponents and the American Civil Liberties Union for the Sept.
NEWS
October 20, 2002
Smaller firms keep tech sector surging forward If you made it through the first eight paragraphs of Jay Hancock's column, "Glendening's high-tech legacy is likely to endure for years" (Oct. 6), you would find a positive tribute to Maryland's technology community, the impressive number of tech jobs created here, and the stockpile of tech talent this region now boasts. Before reaching that conclusion, however, Mr. Hancock describes in great detail the recent economic problems of four area tech companies, intimating that their troubles are indicative of the state of the entire industry in Maryland.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 20, 2007
A few words about the Rev. Jerry Falwell's finest hour. Some would say his life did not produce many such hours but, rather, a surfeit of regrettable ones. Like in 1958, when he preached that God meant for black Americans to serve white ones. Like in 1985, when he offered warm support to the apartheid government of South Africa and denounced Bishop Desmond Tutu as a "phony." Like in 1999, when he published an article warning parents that Tinky Winky of the toddlers' show Teletubbies was gay. Like in 2001, when he blamed abortion providers, gay rights proponents and the American Civil Liberties Union for the Sept.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | May 20, 2007
Bloggers opened up on the Rev. Jerry Falwell immediately after news broke that he had died last week at age 73 of an apparent heart attack. Opinions were everywhere, and most veered to the extreme. Wonkette had a field day. "Praise God, Jerry Falwell is dead," announced the headline on one of three Falwell posts on the site. "At a time like this, people deserve sympathy and good wishes ... except for Falwell, who is an evil sonofab----," the site wrote in its first Falwell post of the day. "Over his long career as a vile televangelist building an empire of bigotry from the donations of poor people, Falwell has supported South African apartheid, called AIDS an invention of Jesus to punish gays, attacked Martin Luther King and U.S. civil rights, and blamed 9/11 on feminists and homosexuals."
NEWS
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 16, 2007
The Rev. Jerry Falwell, the conservative televangelist and founder of the Moral Majority, died yesterday afternoon at a Lynchburg, Va., hospital after being found unconscious and without a pulse in his office at Liberty University. Mr. Falwell, who gained national stature for galvanizing conservative Christians into political action during the 1980s, was 73 and had suffered from a heart condition. The Chicago Tribune interviewed him May 1 at his office in a little stone cottage on the campus of Liberty University, which he founded in 1971 and which has 9,600 students on campus.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2004
Like many Division I college basketball players, Larry Blair's day starts early and ends late. It, however, is everything in between that makes his collegiate experience different than most of his opponents'. There are religious convocations that he must attend and daily prayer sessions that mark the beginning and end of each class and most basketball practices. There are dress restrictions to abide by - no blue jeans outside the dorms - and a strict code of conduct to follow. Alcohol is prohibited on campus and so is cursing, fraternizing with the opposite sex inside dorms and staying out past midnight on weekdays.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 1, 2003
BOSTON -- As a certified flap watcher, I will look back on the Rick Santorum controversy as the cormorant of its species. It took an enormous amount of energy to achieve a modest liftoff and then it flopped unceremoniously back into the political ocean. The flapping began after the Pennsylvania senator offered his comments on the Texas sodomy case: "If the Supreme Court says that you have the right to consensual sex within your home, then you have the right to bigamy, you have the right to polygamy, you have the right to incest, you have the right to adultery.
NEWS
October 20, 2002
Smaller firms keep tech sector surging forward If you made it through the first eight paragraphs of Jay Hancock's column, "Glendening's high-tech legacy is likely to endure for years" (Oct. 6), you would find a positive tribute to Maryland's technology community, the impressive number of tech jobs created here, and the stockpile of tech talent this region now boasts. Before reaching that conclusion, however, Mr. Hancock describes in great detail the recent economic problems of four area tech companies, intimating that their troubles are indicative of the state of the entire industry in Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | July 6, 1994
Washington -- IT SEEMS the self-proclaimed Christian right followers can dish it out, but they can't take it.They have called President Clinton every name in the book.The Rev. Jerry Falwell is selling videotapes that -- without a shred of evidence -- accuse the president of murdering political opponents back in Arkansas.The Christian Coalition has said Mr. Clinton's inauguration was "a repudiation of our forefathers' covenant with God."They have strayed far from traditional religious issues to proclaim the "Christian" position on matters like health care reform.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | July 28, 1994
PERHAPS malign fate hasn't cast you up against the lunatic fringe, so you may not know that the president of the United States is, in reality, the Mr. Big of a modern Murder Inc.Yes, Bill Clinton, the Arkansas doughboy, soft of tummy and thigh and a politician who feels your pain even before you do, is godfather to a band of political assassins and ruffians.They have been offing his opponents, wasting investigators and even mowing down political bystanders in numbers and with a ruthlessness that would give Attila pause.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 20, 2000
AT A TIME when the Christian world is focusing on the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth and the meaning of those events, the Rev. Jerry Falwell is again focusing on politics. A decade ago, after disbanding the Moral Majority (for which I toiled for five years), Mr. Falwell announced he was going back to preaching. People who heard him said his preaching became more powerful when he returned to his first love. But he has again succumbed to the temptation of politics and its illusion of power.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | March 7, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO -- For months now, today's California primary has been billed as the prime battleground of the Super Tuesday bunch of 16 delegate-selecting tests. From all signs however, it won't live up to that advance billing. On the Democratic side, Al Gore is so sure he has the state in his pocket that he left soon after his lovefest final debate with Bill Bradley a week ago and didn't come back. As for Mr. Bradley, he also high-tailed it out in hope of salvaging something in New York and the New England states, all also voting today, and didn't return either.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.