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Jeremy Rose

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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
STANTON, Del. -- It has been three years since jockey Jeremy Rose rode Afleet Alex to a stunning victory in the Preakness at Pimlico Race Course. But as he sat on a bench outside the jockeys' room at Delaware Park this week, he still could feel the horse under him, still sense the disaster nearly averted. And still recall it as if he had just finished the race. "At the three-eighths pole, we were still six or seven lengths off it [the lead]," said Rose, excitement touching his voice. "The horse in front of me decided to go out, around Scappy T and another horse.
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From Sun staff reports | March 17, 2013
Norman Asbjornson ran down front-runner Eighttofasttocatch to win the $125,000 Harrison E. Johnson Memorial Stakes on Saturday at Laurel Park. The 5-year-old, who was sent to post at 6-1 under Jeremy Rose for trainer Carlos Mancilla, earned his first stakes victory. Norman Asbjornson hinted at his potential in his previous start when he was elevated to second in the John B. Campbell Stakes last month after he was fouled by Service for Ten in the final furlong. Mancilla is filling in for trainer Chris Grove, who is serving a suspension.
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NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
For Jeremy Rose, Afleet Alex was the horse of a lifetime. Many jockeys ride entire careers, risking their lives every race, and never sit astride a horse as talented. Yet Rose, a 26-year-old from Cecil County, will ride the colt in the 130th Preakness Stakes at Pimlico, where he is likely to be the favorite. Horse and rider bonded quickly last summer. The colt Rose calls "my buddy" had been abandoned by his mother and bottle fed for the first 12 days of his life. He was good around people and, as a racehorse, had class and confidence.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 11, 2013
Anyone who has seen a thoroughbred in full stride has probably wondered: Where would they go if they could roam free? The answer for a 4-year-old gelding named Bullet Catcher who escaped Laurel Park Friday morning is that he followed the road ahead of him. Which saved his life. “We're not really sure why he stuck to the road so closely, or how he happened to hit all the lights and make the right turns,” said Mark Rosenthal, a former jockey and owner of the gelding. “He's a lucky horse.” After throwing jockey Jeremy Rose around 9 a.m. Friday following a workout, Bullet Catcher ran past a security outpost at the back of the track - officials didn't have time to close the gate, Rosenthal said - and veered right toward the open road.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2002
Xtra Heat heads the list of horses and people in Maryland racing announced yesterday as finalists for the 2001 Eclipse Awards, the coveted statuettes that denote "champions" of the sport. Laurel-based Xtra Heat was named a finalist in two categories: 3-year-old filly and sprinter. Other finalists with Maryland ties were Scott Lake (trainer), Ramon Dominguez (jockey) and Jeremy Rose (apprentice jockey). Finalists for Horse of the Year were Johannesburg, Point Given and Tiznow. Winners will be announced Feb. 18 at the 31st Eclipse Awards banquet in Miami Beach, Fla. Voting for the awards were racing writers, employees of the Daily Racing Form and representatives of the National Thoroughbred Racing Association.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 20, 2011
It's been a good start to Preakness weekend for Maryland horse racing. In the first race of the day today, Sagamore Farm's All Mettle won the $30,000 maiden special weight race in just her second career start. She finished third in her first career race at Keeneland Opening Day on April 8. Luciano was second and Aquitania finished third. Jose Lezcano had the mount on All Mettle, who paid $3 to win. In the first stakes race of the day, the $75,000 Jim McKay Turf Sprint, Ben's Cat, bred, owned and trained by legendary Maryland trainer King Leatherbury, covered the five furlongs in :59.71, rallying to win by two lengths.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - The tranquility of a Belmont Stakes without a Triple Crown on the line ended yesterday with jockey Jeremy Rose exchanging barbs with a New York trainer and trainer Tim Ritchey relocating Afleet Alex to avoid new neighbors. Ritchey and Rose, who live in Maryland, had already been the center of attention because of their association with Afleet Alex, popular winner of the Preakness and likely favorite in tomorrow's Belmont. Afleet Alex will face 10 challengers, including Giacomo, winner of the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | March 17, 2013
Norman Asbjornson ran down front-runner Eighttofasttocatch to win the $125,000 Harrison E. Johnson Memorial Stakes on Saturday at Laurel Park. The 5-year-old, who was sent to post at 6-1 under Jeremy Rose for trainer Carlos Mancilla, earned his first stakes victory. Norman Asbjornson hinted at his potential in his previous start when he was elevated to second in the John B. Campbell Stakes last month after he was fouled by Service for Ten in the final furlong. Mancilla is filling in for trainer Chris Grove, who is serving a suspension.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - Jeremy Rose can't shake the questions about Belmont Park's unusual configuration, about the Belmont Stakes' demanding distance and about his inexperience in major races. Rose, 26, who lives in Elkton, Md., has heard countless times that jockeys, even big-name jockeys, have lost the Belmont by moving too soon, by failing to coax their horses to relax or by succumbing to the pressure. Rose, who will ride Afleet Alex in the Belmont today at Belmont Park, seems unfazed. His confidence borders on cockiness.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 1, 2013
Under confident handling, Marc Ferrell's Called to Serve waited behind the leaders, tipped to the outside and pounced, winning the $125,000 Broad Brush Stakes, the co-feature on New Year's Eve at Laurel Park. Joel Rosario was at the controls as the Nick Canani trainee covered the nine furlongs in 1 minute 50.75 seconds. Eighttofasttocatch, who has six stakes victories at Laurel Park, set the pace and was racing comfortably on the lead but could offer no resistance when Called to Serve ranged up to his outside.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | January 1, 2013
Under confident handling, Marc Ferrell's Called to Serve waited behind the leaders, tipped to the outside and pounced, winning the $125,000 Broad Brush Stakes, the co-feature on New Year's Eve at Laurel Park. Joel Rosario was at the controls as the Nick Canani trainee covered the nine furlongs in 1 minute 50.75 seconds. Eighttofasttocatch, who has six stakes victories at Laurel Park, set the pace and was racing comfortably on the lead but could offer no resistance when Called to Serve ranged up to his outside.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | May 20, 2011
It's been a good start to Preakness weekend for Maryland horse racing. In the first race of the day today, Sagamore Farm's All Mettle won the $30,000 maiden special weight race in just her second career start. She finished third in her first career race at Keeneland Opening Day on April 8. Luciano was second and Aquitania finished third. Jose Lezcano had the mount on All Mettle, who paid $3 to win. In the first stakes race of the day, the $75,000 Jim McKay Turf Sprint, Ben's Cat, bred, owned and trained by legendary Maryland trainer King Leatherbury, covered the five furlongs in :59.71, rallying to win by two lengths.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | May 14, 2008
STANTON, Del. -- It has been three years since jockey Jeremy Rose rode Afleet Alex to a stunning victory in the Preakness at Pimlico Race Course. But as he sat on a bench outside the jockeys' room at Delaware Park this week, he still could feel the horse under him, still sense the disaster nearly averted. And still recall it as if he had just finished the race. "At the three-eighths pole, we were still six or seven lengths off it [the lead]," said Rose, excitement touching his voice. "The horse in front of me decided to go out, around Scappy T and another horse.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN REPORTER | April 9, 2007
Jeremy Rose is 28, stands 5 feet tall and loves dogs - especially Zoey, his Rottweiler; Titan, his bull mastiff; and Damian, his Great Dane, who is taller than he is when standing on his hind legs. Obviously, he's not one of those dog owners who look like their pets. But, then, Rose has never exactly been conventional. A native of State College, Pa., Rose didn't start riding racehorses until he was 21. He planned to go to college on a wrestling scholarship, until the weight-class qualification moved from 118 pounds to 126 and he couldn't gain enough to compete.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - Jeremy Rose can't shake the questions about Belmont Park's unusual configuration, about the Belmont Stakes' demanding distance and about his inexperience in major races. Rose, 26, who lives in Elkton, Md., has heard countless times that jockeys, even big-name jockeys, have lost the Belmont by moving too soon, by failing to coax their horses to relax or by succumbing to the pressure. Rose, who will ride Afleet Alex in the Belmont today at Belmont Park, seems unfazed. His confidence borders on cockiness.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2005
ELMONT, N.Y. - The tranquility of a Belmont Stakes without a Triple Crown on the line ended yesterday with jockey Jeremy Rose exchanging barbs with a New York trainer and trainer Tim Ritchey relocating Afleet Alex to avoid new neighbors. Ritchey and Rose, who live in Maryland, had already been the center of attention because of their association with Afleet Alex, popular winner of the Preakness and likely favorite in tomorrow's Belmont. Afleet Alex will face 10 challengers, including Giacomo, winner of the Kentucky Derby.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | January 11, 2013
Anyone who has seen a thoroughbred in full stride has probably wondered: Where would they go if they could roam free? The answer for a 4-year-old gelding named Bullet Catcher who escaped Laurel Park Friday morning is that he followed the road ahead of him. Which saved his life. “We're not really sure why he stuck to the road so closely, or how he happened to hit all the lights and make the right turns,” said Mark Rosenthal, a former jockey and owner of the gelding. “He's a lucky horse.” After throwing jockey Jeremy Rose around 9 a.m. Friday following a workout, Bullet Catcher ran past a security outpost at the back of the track - officials didn't have time to close the gate, Rosenthal said - and veered right toward the open road.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Sun Reporter | May 22, 2005
After a frightening, lightning-quick incident on the final turn nearly knocked him off his feet, the nimble and powerful Afleet Alex rocketed to victory in the 130th Preakness Stakes before a record crowd of 115,318 yesterday at Pimlico Race Course . Scrappy T, who was leading, suddenly cut in front of Afleet Alex, who was charging, and the horses clipped heels. Afleet Alex's front legs crumpled, and his nose nearly hit the ground. As jockey Jeremy Rose desperately hung on, Afleet Alex regained his balance and, amazingly, his momentum.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Sun Reporter | May 22, 2005
After a frightening, lightning-quick incident on the final turn nearly knocked him off his feet, the nimble and powerful Afleet Alex rocketed to victory in the 130th Preakness Stakes before a record crowd of 115,318 yesterday at Pimlico Race Course . Scrappy T, who was leading, suddenly cut in front of Afleet Alex, who was charging, and the horses clipped heels. Afleet Alex's front legs crumpled, and his nose nearly hit the ground. As jockey Jeremy Rose desperately hung on, Afleet Alex regained his balance and, amazingly, his momentum.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
For Jeremy Rose, Afleet Alex was the horse of a lifetime. Many jockeys ride entire careers, risking their lives every race, and never sit astride a horse as talented. Yet Rose, a 26-year-old from Cecil County, will ride the colt in the 130th Preakness Stakes at Pimlico, where he is likely to be the favorite. Horse and rider bonded quickly last summer. The colt Rose calls "my buddy" had been abandoned by his mother and bottle fed for the first 12 days of his life. He was good around people and, as a racehorse, had class and confidence.
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