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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Keeping Up With the Steins is equal parts a rumination on the rapacious silliness that comes from efforts to keep up with the Joneses and a tale of family rapprochement. Too bad the filmmakers couldn't settle on one plotline and stick with it. The resulting film is affable enough, featuring an endearing turn from Garry Marshall as an eccentric grandfather who, on the occasion of his grandson's bar mitzvah, seems the only person in the universe concentrating on the boy's best interests.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 21, 2008
Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first," said Ronald Reagan. The third oldest profession must be the creation of award shows. And while we ponder the writers' strike and the end of "Hollywood" as we have known it, did anybody notice that most of the winners of the Golden Globe Awards were not notably the big talents here in the colonies? Great Britain, Australia, France and Spain triumphed with the following: best picture for the English Atonement, best movie acting awards to Julie Christie, Daniel Day-Lewis, Cate Blanchett, Marion Cotillard, Javier Bardem and two awards to the British TV drama Longford.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1997
ABC, tired for the moment of plugging Disney World on its shows, goes for the next best thing: this time, it's off to Vega$! Excited? Me neither."Grace Under Fire" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Brett Butler and company start off the high-rolling evening, as Grace accompanies her mother-in-law to Vegas and is mildly disturbed when the older woman finds both a new love and a new place to live. Somehow, Drew Carey, Jerry Van Dyke of "Coach" and Joely Fisher and Jeremy Piven of "Ellen" work their way into the plot.
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By Cox News Service | January 28, 2007
ATLANTA -- The oily agent Ari Gold in HBO's Entourage and the coked-out Vegas entertainer-cum-mobster Buddy "Aces" Israel in the movie Smokin' Aces (which opened Friday) are pure, manic energy. But Jeremy Piven, the guy who plays them both, is trying not to pass out on the table of a Midtown hotel conference room during a recent visit to Atlanta. "I don't know how rock stars do it, man," he groans, groggy, slouching forward. "Waking up really early and working all day until you get on a plane -- that's what's kind of brutal."
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 21, 2008
Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first," said Ronald Reagan. The third oldest profession must be the creation of award shows. And while we ponder the writers' strike and the end of "Hollywood" as we have known it, did anybody notice that most of the winners of the Golden Globe Awards were not notably the big talents here in the colonies? Great Britain, Australia, France and Spain triumphed with the following: best picture for the English Atonement, best movie acting awards to Julie Christie, Daniel Day-Lewis, Cate Blanchett, Marion Cotillard, Javier Bardem and two awards to the British TV drama Longford.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Trivia test: What star returning to the CBS lineup after a period of mid-season hiatus made his debut in the very same role more than 30 years ago? Hint: Before that, he was the dapper star of a popular western. (See "Burke's Law," below.)* "What About Your Friends?" (4 p.m.-5 p.m., Channel 13) -- It's that time of year, when high school seniors anxiously scan the mail for college acceptance or rejection. In this "Schoolbreak Special," Monica Calhoun, Lark Voorhies and Malinda Williams are close friends hoping to get into the same school.
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By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 2003
Acarload of women on a "girls' night out" see a naked man with too much beer in him running down the road. These women aren't scandalized so much as they are perversely fascinated. They want to look away, but this goofy drunken nude guy is strangely compelling. And as they get closer, the driver is horrified to discover that the fleshy, curly-haired fellow is her new husband. He's just streaking to have fun, he insists, but she sensibly demands that he get in the car. So as her giddily appalled friends scrunch over, he plants his plump derriere on the seat next to them.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
Jack Campbell is a modern-day Scrooge, a slick, cocky, $2,400 Ermenegildo Zegna suit-wearing investment bank president. He has no life outside work and snorts derisively when his minions dare to suggest leaving the office in time for Christmas Eve dinner with their families. In fact, Campbell (Nicolas Cage) is so hardened to matters unrelated to corporate takeovers that he thinks he doesn't regret picking his career over his college sweetheart 13 years ago. But one night he meets a mysterious stranger (Don Cheadle)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRTITC | September 26, 1998
Jeremy Piven ("Ellen") plays a guy in modern-day Chicago who claims to be Cupid, god of love. He says he got temporarily bounced from Olympus and needs to put 100 couples together in the Windy City before he can get back in.Paula Marshall ("Spin City") plays the lady shrink who is called in to check him out. She thinks he's a nutcase, but she's kind of attracted to him -- you know, the way Maddie was attracted to the nutcase named David on "Moonlighting."Give ABC credit: this is not your standard sitcom premise.
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By Andrew Noyes and Andrew Noyes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2004
Pop princess-turned-actress Mandy Moore and her Chasing Liberty co-star Matthew Goode casually munch on jelly beans in a suite at the historic Hay Adams hotel overlooking the White House lawn -- a fitting backdrop for an interview, since their film, opening tomorrow, is an enchanting tale of a first daughter fed up with her protective parents, Secret Service agents and the media, who monitor her every move. Not unlike her character, Anna Foster -- whose Secret Service code name is "Liberty" -- Moore, 19, was catapulted into the public eye at an early age. But she doesn't claim to know what it's like to be Chelsea Clinton or Barbara and Jenna Bush.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Keeping Up With the Steins is equal parts a rumination on the rapacious silliness that comes from efforts to keep up with the Joneses and a tale of family rapprochement. Too bad the filmmakers couldn't settle on one plotline and stick with it. The resulting film is affable enough, featuring an endearing turn from Garry Marshall as an eccentric grandfather who, on the occasion of his grandson's bar mitzvah, seems the only person in the universe concentrating on the boy's best interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Noyes and Andrew Noyes,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2004
Pop princess-turned-actress Mandy Moore and her Chasing Liberty co-star Matthew Goode casually munch on jelly beans in a suite at the historic Hay Adams hotel overlooking the White House lawn -- a fitting backdrop for an interview, since their film, opening tomorrow, is an enchanting tale of a first daughter fed up with her protective parents, Secret Service agents and the media, who monitor her every move. Not unlike her character, Anna Foster -- whose Secret Service code name is "Liberty" -- Moore, 19, was catapulted into the public eye at an early age. But she doesn't claim to know what it's like to be Chelsea Clinton or Barbara and Jenna Bush.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 21, 2003
Acarload of women on a "girls' night out" see a naked man with too much beer in him running down the road. These women aren't scandalized so much as they are perversely fascinated. They want to look away, but this goofy drunken nude guy is strangely compelling. And as they get closer, the driver is horrified to discover that the fleshy, curly-haired fellow is her new husband. He's just streaking to have fun, he insists, but she sensibly demands that he get in the car. So as her giddily appalled friends scrunch over, he plants his plump derriere on the seat next to them.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
Jack Campbell is a modern-day Scrooge, a slick, cocky, $2,400 Ermenegildo Zegna suit-wearing investment bank president. He has no life outside work and snorts derisively when his minions dare to suggest leaving the office in time for Christmas Eve dinner with their families. In fact, Campbell (Nicolas Cage) is so hardened to matters unrelated to corporate takeovers that he thinks he doesn't regret picking his career over his college sweetheart 13 years ago. But one night he meets a mysterious stranger (Don Cheadle)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRTITC | September 26, 1998
Jeremy Piven ("Ellen") plays a guy in modern-day Chicago who claims to be Cupid, god of love. He says he got temporarily bounced from Olympus and needs to put 100 couples together in the Windy City before he can get back in.Paula Marshall ("Spin City") plays the lady shrink who is called in to check him out. She thinks he's a nutcase, but she's kind of attracted to him -- you know, the way Maddie was attracted to the nutcase named David on "Moonlighting."Give ABC credit: this is not your standard sitcom premise.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1997
ABC, tired for the moment of plugging Disney World on its shows, goes for the next best thing: this time, it's off to Vega$! Excited? Me neither."Grace Under Fire" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Brett Butler and company start off the high-rolling evening, as Grace accompanies her mother-in-law to Vegas and is mildly disturbed when the older woman finds both a new love and a new place to live. Somehow, Drew Carey, Jerry Van Dyke of "Coach" and Joely Fisher and Jeremy Piven of "Ellen" work their way into the plot.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 28, 2007
ATLANTA -- The oily agent Ari Gold in HBO's Entourage and the coked-out Vegas entertainer-cum-mobster Buddy "Aces" Israel in the movie Smokin' Aces (which opened Friday) are pure, manic energy. But Jeremy Piven, the guy who plays them both, is trying not to pass out on the table of a Midtown hotel conference room during a recent visit to Atlanta. "I don't know how rock stars do it, man," he groans, groggy, slouching forward. "Waking up really early and working all day until you get on a plane -- that's what's kind of brutal."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 26, 2007
It's hard to figure where it's going, and when the movie's over, it's even harder figuring where it's been. But the careening roller-coaster ride calling itself Smokin' Aces is such a hoot to be on, who really cares? Best of all, writer-director Joe Carnahan injects a steady stream of black humor into the proceedings (at least until the final act, where things turn all serious and edifying). Unlike his previous film, the loathsome bloodbath Narc, Smokin' Aces revels in its absurdity. The acting is over the top, the story line is over the top, even the cinematography - stark overexposures and unflattering close-ups - is over the top. You don't believe a minute of it, but the film has such a reckless, gonzo sensibility that it's impossible not to get overwhelmed (in a good way)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
Trivia test: What star returning to the CBS lineup after a period of mid-season hiatus made his debut in the very same role more than 30 years ago? Hint: Before that, he was the dapper star of a popular western. (See "Burke's Law," below.)* "What About Your Friends?" (4 p.m.-5 p.m., Channel 13) -- It's that time of year, when high school seniors anxiously scan the mail for college acceptance or rejection. In this "Schoolbreak Special," Monica Calhoun, Lark Voorhies and Malinda Williams are close friends hoping to get into the same school.
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