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Jeremy Irons

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By The Hollywood Reporter | July 7, 1995
Jeremy Irons is in final negotiations to star in Adrian Lyne's remake of Stanley Kubrick's 1962 classic dark comedy "Lolita."Sources said that Mr. Irons will play the part of Humbert Humbert, a gentle English professor whose life turns tragic because of his passionate love for a 12-year-old nymphet and the vengeful determination of the girl's sleazy but canny former lover.While Dianne Wiest initially had been considered for the role of Lolita's mother, sources said that discussions are under way to bring Melanie Griffith on board.
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By Michael Ordona and Michael Ordona,Los Angeles Times | July 30, 2008
First Matthew Goode confounded all the early comparisons to Hugh Grant by playing an American sociopath in 2007's The Lookout. Now the handsome, lanky English actor takes on perhaps his most morally complex role in the film version of a literary classic listed among Time magazine's top 100 novels since 1923. But more on the graphic novel-to-big screen Watchmen later. Right now, Goode is in another adaptation: Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited (which also made Time's list) as the reserved, working-class Charles Ryder.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 6, 1992
Nobody unravels like Jeremy Irons.He doesn't just wilt or fade or become slightly woozy and call out for the vapors; no, he deconstructs with the rueful inevitability of the collapse of the empire. Sick beams of regret and helplessness cloud his eyes, his complexion acquires the patina of faded blossoms, and his body seems to disassemble itself into a pile of pretzel bits. His last recorded expression is the look of the rabbit in the picosecond before the 18-wheeler turns it into a component in the road surface.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 15, 2006
Eragon isn't much, but its baby dragon sure is adorable. A sword-and-sorcery saga that desperately wants to be another Lord of the Rings, Eragon succeeds in being only the palest of imitations. It lacks scope, grandeur, humanity and style. What it does have is a teen-heartthrob hero who somehow manages to keep his hair ever-so-properly tousled, regardless of whom he is fighting, plus some passable special effects and a handful of big-name stars on hand to collect a paycheck. Eragon (Fox 2000 Pictures)
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By DAN BERGER | March 27, 1991
Getting into Iraq was easy. Getting out is impossible.Imagine giving the best actor award to Jeremy Irons and not to Claus Von Bulow, who created the part.The Supreme Court approves the death penalty regardless of whether the trial court imposed it.Prediction: Duke will beat UNLV in the Final Four, in 1992.
FEATURES
March 25, 1991
Here are Sun Film Critic Stephen Hunter's picks in the major Oscar categories:Picture: "Dances With Wolves"Director: Kevin Costner, "Dances With Wolves"Actor: Jeremy Irons, "Reversal of Fortune"Actress: Joanne Woodward, "Mr. and Mrs. Bridge"Supporting actor: Graham Greene, "Dances With Wolves"Supporting actress: Whoopi Goldberg, "Ghost"Screenplay -- Adaptation: "Dances With Wolves"Screenplay -- Original: "Avalon"Foreign Language Film: "Cyrano"Cinematography: "Dances...
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 15, 2006
Eragon isn't much, but its baby dragon sure is adorable. A sword-and-sorcery saga that desperately wants to be another Lord of the Rings, Eragon succeeds in being only the palest of imitations. It lacks scope, grandeur, humanity and style. What it does have is a teen-heartthrob hero who somehow manages to keep his hair ever-so-properly tousled, regardless of whom he is fighting, plus some passable special effects and a handful of big-name stars on hand to collect a paycheck. Eragon (Fox 2000 Pictures)
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
Steven Soderbergh's "Kafka" isn't about Kafka the man or Kafka the writer. It's about Kafka the concept.In fact, if you've never heard of Franz Kafka -- much less read word one of the Czech writer's limited but seminal output -- but you've been using the all-purpose adjective "Kafkaesque" to describe anything complex yet bizarre, then you'll love "Kafka" the movie, which opens today at the Charles and runs through Sunday.Soderbergh's "gimmick," to use a crude word, is to put a Kafka-like character into a mystery-adventure in Prague in 1919 that will teach him exactly the lessons and the meanings of the word Kafkaesque.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 19, 2004
In Being Julia, Annette Bening gets to play a hammy British stage actress in 1930s London who, having been made a fool of, decides that no one should be allowed to get away with that. It's a dream role for any actress, carte blanche to chew any scenery that comes within range. She gets to play flighty and flustered and vengeful, sometimes all within a single scene. And Bening approaches the role of Julia Lambert as though she wants to devour it. Maybe she does; Being Julia is her first starring role since 2000's tragically unhilarious What Planet Are You From?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 17, 1992
Steven Soderbergh's "Kafka" isn't about Kafka the man or Kafka the writer. It's about Kafka the concept.In fact, if you've never heard of Franz Kafka -- much less read word one of the Czech writer's limited but seminal output -- but you've been using the all-purpose adjective "Kafkaesque" to describe anything complex yet bizarre, then you'll love "Kafka" -- the movie, which opens today at the Charles.Soderbergh's "gimmick," to use a crude word, is to put a Kafka-like character into a mystery-adventure in Prague in 1919 that will teach him exactly the lessons and the meanings of the word Kafkaesque.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 19, 2004
In Being Julia, Annette Bening gets to play a hammy British stage actress in 1930s London who, having been made a fool of, decides that no one should be allowed to get away with that. It's a dream role for any actress, carte blanche to chew any scenery that comes within range. She gets to play flighty and flustered and vengeful, sometimes all within a single scene. And Bening approaches the role of Julia Lambert as though she wants to devour it. Maybe she does; Being Julia is her first starring role since 2000's tragically unhilarious What Planet Are You From?
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
"Dungeons & Dragons" likely will be to its young stars what film dud "Leprechaun" is to Jennifer Aniston - that embarrassingly terrible early flick that people forever will bring up to mock the depths to which you once sank just to make it to the big screen. And it's a pity, because the '80s game is so wildly creative that it had the potential to be a great movie stuffed with super-cool special effects in the style of "The Matrix." Instead, director Courtney Solomon's "D&D" is more like a sub-par after-school TV special with bad acting, worse lines and not much else.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 1, 1999
"Lolita," Adrian Lyne's adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov's unadaptable novel, is much better than it has any right to be.As anyone who has read the book knows, the artistry of "Lolita" lies in the writing, in Nabokov's cunning use of the English language in the creation of character, mood and unstoppable narrative. Unless a director were literally to photograph pages turning, why on earth bother to film it?Lyne makes a surprisingly good case in this smart, well-acted interpretation. If his version doesn't necessarily bring new insight or fresh emphasis to Nabokov's story of obsession and destruction, neither does it besmirch the original work in any way.It's a noble effort, forming a respectable bookend to Stanley Kubrick's entirely surreal stab at "Lolita" 36 years ago. And bookend is the appropriate term, because between these two relatively minor movies stands a towering work of art that is first, last and always literary.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 6, 1995
What an odd, chilly cup of tea is John Schlesinger's "The Innocent." It slipped into the Greenspring with a great cast -- Anthony Hopkins, Campbell Scott and Isabella Rossellini -- but without benefit of a screening, a commercial decision that seemed foolish at the time but now seems the quintessence of marketing wisdom.The movie turns out to be a spy thriller set in the Berlin of the '50s. But just about every note is brightly, noisily false. In fact, the movie is so wrong from start to finish it's some kind of monument to human folly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | July 7, 1995
Jeremy Irons is in final negotiations to star in Adrian Lyne's remake of Stanley Kubrick's 1962 classic dark comedy "Lolita."Sources said that Mr. Irons will play the part of Humbert Humbert, a gentle English professor whose life turns tragic because of his passionate love for a 12-year-old nymphet and the vengeful determination of the girl's sleazy but canny former lover.While Dianne Wiest initially had been considered for the role of Lolita's mother, sources said that discussions are under way to bring Melanie Griffith on board.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
Bruce Willis go BOOM!"Die Hard With a Vengeance" is an explosive thrill ride. That is its sole purpose, and it succeeds, loudly and breathlessly. And although it parallels the first "Die Hard" -- which destroyed only an L.A. office building, not huge chunks of New York, as this one does -- it doesn't deal with any of that namby-pamby rescue-the-wife stuff.One wishes it would perhaps evoke more emotions than "Wow, cool!" or that the audience wouldn't cheer quite so loudly when characters are killed in exceedingly nasty ways, but what the heck.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
"Dungeons & Dragons" likely will be to its young stars what film dud "Leprechaun" is to Jennifer Aniston - that embarrassingly terrible early flick that people forever will bring up to mock the depths to which you once sank just to make it to the big screen. And it's a pity, because the '80s game is so wildly creative that it had the potential to be a great movie stuffed with super-cool special effects in the style of "The Matrix." Instead, director Courtney Solomon's "D&D" is more like a sub-par after-school TV special with bad acting, worse lines and not much else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
Bruce Willis go BOOM!"Die Hard With a Vengeance" is an explosive thrill ride. That is its sole purpose, and it succeeds, loudly and breathlessly. And although it parallels the first "Die Hard" -- which destroyed only an L.A. office building, not huge chunks of New York, as this one does -- it doesn't deal with any of that namby-pamby rescue-the-wife stuff.One wishes it would perhaps evoke more emotions than "Wow, cool!" or that the audience wouldn't cheer quite so loudly when characters are killed in exceedingly nasty ways, but what the heck.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 27, 1994
It could be argued that the prevailing literary mode in the world is something that's never really caught on in America. It's ,, called magic realism, and its ascendancy signifies the rise of Latin America as the source of much late 20th-century literature.Though set in a recognizeable world, it's still a world shimmering with the supernatural. Dogs talk and people have green hair. Ghosts hover in the near distance. The most lugubrious coincidences rattle through plots front-loaded with melodrama and happenstance, but in a way that signifies the author isn't stupid so much as ironic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 6, 1992
Nobody unravels like Jeremy Irons.He doesn't just wilt or fade or become slightly woozy and call out for the vapors; no, he deconstructs with the rueful inevitability of the collapse of the empire. Sick beams of regret and helplessness cloud his eyes, his complexion acquires the patina of faded blossoms, and his body seems to disassemble itself into a pile of pretzel bits. His last recorded expression is the look of the rabbit in the picosecond before the 18-wheeler turns it into a component in the road surface.
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