Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJeopardy
IN THE NEWS

Jeopardy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ALEX BEAM | April 23, 1993
Boston. -- As I rushed forward to join the throng celebrating the Rodney King verdicts, I noticed a crumpled scrap of paper underneath my feet.Picking it up, I saw it was the Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which states that no one shall ''be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb.'' Oh, that silly old thing.In the collective euphoria following the guilty verdicts in Rodney King II, only a few public figures -- Boston attorneys Harvey Silverglate and Alan Dershowitz, New York Times columnist William Safire -- have pointed out the obvious: The four LosAngeles police officers were tried twice for the same crime, in flagrant disregard of the Constitution's protection against double jeopardy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
In his appearance this morning on ESPN 's NFL Countdown, former linebacker Ray Lewis defended Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and general manager Ozzie Newsome, but he added that the organization probably would like a do-over in its handling of the Ray Rice fallout. "I've known Ozzie Newsome now over 19 years over my career. That's half of my life. I've known Steve Bisciotti over 15 years of my life. And each one of those men, bottom line, has never lied to me once," an emotional Lewis said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Johnny Slaughter | February 26, 2014
For years, a group of black men has gathered daily at a cigar shop across from Cross Street Market, here in Baltimore. We talk politics and sports amid plumes of pipe and cigar smoke. However, conversation halts at 7 p.m. when the quiz show "Jeopardy" begins. The wide-screen display, mounted high on an exposed brick wall, shutters conversation when the words: "This. Is. Jeopardy!" bellow from the speakers. An eclectic group of business owners, active/retired police officers, firefighters, salesmen and educators congregate and shout "questions" to the proffered answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Thanks to a DVR issue, I missed the first 13 minutes of the recording. The first thing I find out is that Betsey Johnson and Tony Dovolani are the first couple in jeopardy. Then we get a montage of the female contestants explaining why they came on the show. It has annoying on-screen graphics. Still not in love with the new showrunner's ideas. Today I was relieved to find out that I wasn't the only one who thought the direction on last night's show was atrocious, with random cutaways, accidental shots of the crew, and poor time management that meant all the judges didn't get to speak.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | December 23, 2009
The proposed mega-fight between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather Jr . was thrown into jeopardy Tuesday when Mayweather's camp demanded that both fighters be subjected to Olympic-type drug testing in the weeks leading up to the bout. Mayweather's manager said the fight would not go on if Pacquiao didn't agree to blood testing under standards followed by the United States Anti-Doping Agency. Mayweather's camp claims it was told Pacquiao would not agree to have his blood tested within 30 days of the fight because of personal superstitions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
Sarah Bart, a senior at Goucher College, won again Thursday night on the "Jeopardy! College Championship" competition. It wasn't even close. Bart more than doubled the combined total of both of her competitors, Greer Mackabee, of Duke, and Jaime Alayon, of George Washington University. Host Alex Trebek said Bart would be back in "two days" to compete again. The competition, which includes $100,000 in prize money, concludes Feb. 14. The 22-year-old Bart was a machine Thursday night dominating such categories as "Game of Thrones" and "Foreign Capitals.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | July 6, 2008
The Rev. Dave Simpson is not a pedantic scholar. And he does not devote his time playing in trivia leagues or memorizing factoids. But the Lutheran minister who likes to read won $90,901 during his five-game stint on the TV game show, Jeopardy. "You can't really study for Jeopardy," said Simpson, 46, an associate minister at the Trinity Lutheran Church in Joppa. "Brad Rutter, the biggest winner on the show, said you do well by a lifetime of paying attention. I've just been curious about things and read a lot."
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | October 1, 1991
THEY SAY that television game shows aren't as popular as they used to be, but "Jeopardy!" is still going strong.I'd rather watch talk shows, which seem to be proliferating like rabbits, because I love to talk and I hate games unless they are out-of-doors and I've got a front seat or am part of the action.If there is one thing that makes me feel inferior, it is "Jeopardy!" and its answers that have to be put in the form of questions by three contestants who you know have been boning up for weeks on reference books and almanacs.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Craig Cornish Jr. knows former U.S. President Martin Van Buren's first language was Dutch, not English. It might seem like a useless bit of historical trivia to some, but the factoid netted Cornish $1,400 on "Jeopardy" and capped off the Morgan State alumnus' second straight win on the popular game show Monday night. The 2013 graduate from Welcome, in Charles County, now attends Princeton for graduate school, Southern Maryland Newspapers reported. Cornish will be back on the show Tuesday at 7 p.m. to defend his streak, which has earned him $46,800 as of the end of Monday's episode.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 26, 2012
Baltimore's very own Trayvon Martin case, at least to some in the community, was thrown into peril on Wednesday when the victim stated from the witness stand he wanted charges dropped. The Sun's court reporter, Tricia Bishop, reports: "I been wanting to drop the charges all the time, I didn't even want to go through [this]. I feel like I was being pressured," said 16-year-old Corey Ausby, who took the stand  with tear tracks staining his face. "In my heart, I didn't want to testify.
NEWS
September 13, 2014
This Ray Rice incident has been a debacle. NFL management denies seeing the film of Mr. Rice striking his now wife in the elevator. Yet receipt of the video was apparently confirmed by an NFL employee. It is interesting how the NFL and the Ravens violated a basic principle of workplace discipline. It's called double jeopardy. Double jeopardy occurs when an employee has been disciplined for an infraction and then a few months later the management decides the disciplinary action was not severe enough and enacts a more severe penalty.
NEWS
July 30, 2014
Here's what bothers me about the Ray Rice punishment: Don't we already have a criminal-justice system? I agree entirely with Mike Preston (" NFL misses its chance to send a message, July 25) that "Men shouldn't be allowed to physically abuse women and then get a slap on the wrist. Ever. " Amen, brother. But let's suppose that Mike Preston (or I, when I was working for the Baltimore Sun) committed an act of domestic violence. Once the courts have acted - arguably, in Mr. Rice's case too leniently - may an employer take a second whack at us?
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Baltimore City Community College has been warned that its accreditation could be in jeopardy amid concerns about its focus, goals and effectiveness, just two years after the college was taken off probation over fixing problems with its assessment of student learning. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education, which accredits colleges and universities in Maryland and several other states and U.S. territories, placed BCCC on "warn" status at its meeting June 26. The action was made public Thursday.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | April 8, 2014
Baltimore city school officials presented Tuesday a budget scenario that could call for "considerable staff layoffs and de-funding key contracts that serve schools" if a $31 million deficit is not closed. In a presentation to the city school board, which can be viewed here , school officials unveiled the first draft of how revenues and expenditures are shaping up for next year. The actual budget for fiscal year 2015 will not be presented until next month, when it also has to be adopted.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Theo Jones is set to graduate from Sojourner-Douglass College with a nursing degree in November, but instead of celebrating as he nears the finish line, he's left wondering if he should transfer to another school. Sojourner-Douglass was ordered this month by its accrediting body to "show cause" or prove why it should not lose its accreditation, and Jones is one of the many students who are deeply worried about their futures. Jones said he's made inquiries to five potential employers in recent weeks, and all have asked him about the school's accreditation status.
NEWS
By Johnny Slaughter | February 26, 2014
For years, a group of black men has gathered daily at a cigar shop across from Cross Street Market, here in Baltimore. We talk politics and sports amid plumes of pipe and cigar smoke. However, conversation halts at 7 p.m. when the quiz show "Jeopardy" begins. The wide-screen display, mounted high on an exposed brick wall, shutters conversation when the words: "This. Is. Jeopardy!" bellow from the speakers. An eclectic group of business owners, active/retired police officers, firefighters, salesmen and educators congregate and shout "questions" to the proffered answers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The results show opens with Witney and four of the male troupe members doing a Latin number. This is a tremendous showcase for her. And you better believe the camera, and camera man, are loving her. Brooke has a dress that looks like her left bosom is covered by a spill-proof bib. It's part of the overall color blocking of the dress, but it's unfortunate nonetheless. Highlight clip package from last night with no new footage of note. Just go read my recap if you missed last night.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
The Ravens could be without one of their best defenders Sunday when they play one of the NFL's most dangerous offenses with their season hanging in the balance. Starting defensive tackle Arthur Jones, who is tied for the team lead with five tackles for a loss, missed practice because of a concussion for the third straight day Friday, putting his status for Sunday's game with the Cincinnati Bengals in jeopardy. Jones, who suffered the injury during last week's 41-7 loss to the New England Patriots, has to pass a baseline test as part of the NFL's concussion protocol to be cleared to play Sunday.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
The highlight of the Orioles' offseason was supposed to take place Friday morning, when the club would emerge from a sleepy offseason and introduce new closer Grant Balfour during a news conference at the Warehouse. But Balfour's two-year, $15 million deal with the Orioles is now in major jeopardy, after team doctors expressed concern with Balfour's right shoulder during his physical, according to industry sources. The 11th-hour snag has forced not only the cancellation of Friday's press conference but also the Orioles' front office to consider its next move with Balfour, whom the club initially agreed to terms with on Tuesday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.