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Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2012
Further news of note for beachgoers: This could be a bad year for stinging nettles in the Chesapeake Bay, a University of Maryland scientist says. Maggie Sexton, with the UM Center for Environmental Science , has been checking for jellyfish daily in the Choptank River at the Horn Point Environmental Laboratory near Cambridge. "The conditions are right to have a large population," she said. "We saw the first one two weeks ago, and now we're starting to see one every day," she said.
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Tim Wheeler | October 16, 2013
If you hurry, you can still catch a free wildlife show at the Inner Harbor. The Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River is alive with big, milky jellyfish swimming lazily about. I'd been hearing from folks about the jellies for the past week or so, then saw them for myself on Tuesday while at the National Aquarium for the kickoff of a new effort to raise oysters in the harbor. It's not unusual to see the balloon-shaped Atlantic sea nettles in the harbor in the fall, said Jack Cover, the aquarium's general curator.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
One byproduct of the rainy weather over the past month is that jellyfish, the bothersome stinging creatures found in the middle Chesapeake Bay this time of year, are being pushed southward and upriver in bay tributaries. In recent years, we have seen the opposite -- jellyfish making their way up into the Baltimore harbor as summer drought has increased salinity in the bay. The creatures known as  Chrysaora quinquecirrha  can only survive in water measuring 10-16 practical salinity units, said Raleigh Hood, a professor with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
One byproduct of the rainy weather over the past month is that jellyfish, the bothersome stinging creatures found in the middle Chesapeake Bay this time of year, are being pushed southward and upriver in bay tributaries. In recent years, we have seen the opposite -- jellyfish making their way up into the Baltimore harbor as summer drought has increased salinity in the bay. The creatures known as  Chrysaora quinquecirrha  can only survive in water measuring 10-16 practical salinity units, said Raleigh Hood, a professor with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 16, 2013
If you hurry, you can still catch a free wildlife show at the Inner Harbor. The Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River is alive with big, milky jellyfish swimming lazily about. I'd been hearing from folks about the jellies for the past week or so, then saw them for myself on Tuesday while at the National Aquarium for the kickoff of a new effort to raise oysters in the harbor. It's not unusual to see the balloon-shaped Atlantic sea nettles in the harbor in the fall, said Jack Cover, the aquarium's general curator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | February 29, 1996
You usually waste no time running away from them. No one ever considers running to them.Jellyfish, those stinging creatures that are avoided at all costs, now will have their own exhibit at the National Aquarium in Baltimore. Staffers are hoping the public will run to see them."Jellies: Phantoms of the Deep" opens Saturday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony by Frances Hughes Glendening, wife of the governor, and it will remain at the aquarium for two years."Jellyfish are just amazing animals," says Mark Donovan, senior director of exhibits and design.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
There's more to jellyfish than stinging goo on the beach.Starting Saturday, visitors to the National Aquarium in Baltimore will get a rare chance to see jellyfish as they really are -- delicate and mesmerizing creatures who are nettlesome to people only because they mistake swimmers for dinner."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1999
The spring drought that stunted the region's crops promises to bring a thick carpet of jellyfish -- a creature that thrives when dry weather turns the Chesapeake nice and salty.Even in years of average rainfall, the bay is more densely packed with jellyfish than any other body of water. It's a fact that's unlikely to appear in a Maryland tourism campaign, but it has been a curious source of pride -- and inspiration -- for Dr. Joseph Burnett, a Maryland dermatologist who is one of the world's experts in jellyfish stings.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1996
For 18-year-old Jason Selig, spending his summer on a science project is much more rewarding than going to the beach."Most times, when you ask kids what they did over the summer, they'll say they got sunburn and hung out at home," said the senior at Chesapeake Senior High School. "I'd rather say that I did research over the summer. It's more challenging than watching TV at my house."And that's what Mr. Selig did. He spent last summer researching the effects of jellyfish extract on the growth of a weed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1998
Say their names. Death adder. Green mamba. Black widow. Boomslang. The words stir ancient fears. Adrenalin seeps into the blood. The heart accelerates. Hairs stand on end.These creatures are not your everyday creepy-crawlies - the garter snake in the woodpile, the house spider that drops onto the bed or the bee that bumbles into the car as you drive.These babies can take you out. And they're waiting for you at the National Aquarium in Baltimore."Venom: Striking Beauties," which runs from Saturday through January 2000, features 40 of the world's scariest critters.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 27, 2012
Further news of note for beachgoers: This could be a bad year for stinging nettles in the Chesapeake Bay, a University of Maryland scientist says. Maggie Sexton, with the UM Center for Environmental Science , has been checking for jellyfish daily in the Choptank River at the Horn Point Environmental Laboratory near Cambridge. "The conditions are right to have a large population," she said. "We saw the first one two weeks ago, and now we're starting to see one every day," she said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2010
The Inner Harbor's no place to swim anyway, but now you can add another reason not to go in the water downtown: jellyfish. Softball-sized, milky white and bell-shaped, with long tentacles trailing, the gelatinous animals could be seen moving slowly about Thursday in the murky water by the Constellation. Scientists identified them as Chrysaora quinquecirrha — the most common of sea nettles in the Chesapeake Bay. Usually, though, they hang out farther south, where they sting unwary bathers and swimmers.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 24, 2008
Yuck! Jellyfish, the squishy bane of the late-summer swimmer, are back again. Although few people have severe reactions to jellyfish stings, those who encounter the creatures are unlikely to forget the meeting soon, says Dr. Roy Cragway, an urgent care physician at Atlantic ImmediCare in Ocean City. What are the symptoms of a jellyfish sting? They're quite variable. They may range from localized itching and burning in the area in which the individual has come into contact with the tentacles to a severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis, which can include rapid pulse, shortness of breath and loss of consciousness.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | May 23, 2008
Jellyfish -- The title of Jellyfish immediately refers to a small girl (Nikol Leidman) with an extraordinarily intense and open face who emerges from the sea outside Tel Aviv, Israel, in bikini bottoms and a flotation tube. She walks into the path of a depressed waitress named Batya (Sarah Adler) and gives her a good shaking-up. But what gives the film a haunting and sometimes droll poetic unity is the way co-directors Etgar Keret and Shira Geffen trace all their characters moving in a jellyfishlike fashion.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2006
SLAUGHTER BEACH, Del.-- --Of all the strange creatures at the beach - jellyfish floating like ghosts in the waves, blood-sucking deer flies searching the sand for human flesh, gold chain-wearing middle-aged men prowling the nightclubs - none has creeped out as many vacationers as this one. With an appearance many find hideous, a personality that's hard to locate and a tendency to be dead or dying when it does come ashore, it's no wonder this decidedly uncuddly...
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
When it comes to mosquitos, many of us fall into the category of "sweet meat," soft targets compared to the walking blood banks around us. Even if we slather on 100 percent DEET (destroying brain cells and anything plastic, like watch faces) there always remains a spot we forgot. Then we spend the night scratching like a junkyard dog with fleas. "After Bite" takes away the itch. The ammonia-based liquid doesn't smell good, but the odor dissipates as it dries. It not only works on mosquito bites but also the nibbles of horse flies and green-head flies.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 15, 2001
That's quite an insider's Cabinet for a president who ran against "Washington. DeeCee," George slipped up. his backup labor secretary is someone the unions respect. Soon there'll be two airlines in the country, Overbooked Air and Flight Delayed. Scientists crossed a monkey with a jellyfish and produced one confused little fella. Close California. It's just too costly to heat and cool.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 25, 1999
Bill was so good campaigning in Macedonia, he ought to run for senator in New York himself.Don't tell the justices, but the doctrine of state sovereignty makes no economic or political sense in the 21st century.Firing teachers only improves the schools when they are replaced by better teachers.The guy vote is so split, Baltimore's next mayor is probably Mary W. Conaway.Forget about the vanishing oyster, blue crab and shad. Our bay is the world's richest stinging jellyfish habitat.Pub Date: 6/25/99
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | July 27, 2006
CHINCOTEAGUE, Va.-- --Wayne Estes woke up before dawn on the third day of his vacation, scarfed down an egg sandwich and doused himself in bug spray. He bucked the heat, putting on his spurs, leather boots, jeans and long-sleeved yellow shirt. Then he settled into the back of his red "cowboy Cadillac" pickup truck for what is, every year, the ride of his life. It is a ride that alternately breaks and warms little girls' hearts as Estes and his fellow "Saltwater Cowboys" round up the wild ponies on Assateague and drive them across the channel to this small Virginia island, where a lucky few can buy the foals at an auction today.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
On the water, nasty stuff happens: scrapes, dings and boo-boos. And that's just the boat. For the humans aboard, a first-aid kit is a must. Adventure Medical Kits, long a supplier to adventurers on terra firma, has come up with eight versions to cover anything from day-tripping to deep-blue voyages. The Marine 300 ($49; www.adventuremedicalkits.com) is perfect for the Chesapeake Bay, where medical assistance is about an hour away. The blue bag is smaller than a Stephen King thriller and weighs 1 pound, 14 ounces.
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