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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
It's funny. As soon as we learned that the Orioles would be playing the Yankees in the ALDS and that they'd be going to the Bronx, I knew I wanted to give Jeff Maier a call. It really had nothing to do with an “anniversary” of the day Maier, then 12, helped a fly ball turn into a game-tying home run in Game 1 of the 1996 ALCS. What people don't realize is that this week is the only other time in the history of the franchises that the Orioles have played the Yankees in the postseason.
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Peter Schmuck and The Schmuck Stops Here | October 7, 2014
There are all sorts of statistics out there to help you discern who's going to have the advantage in the upcoming American League Championship Series between the Orioles and the Kansas City Royals, but you know - in your hearts - that none of that stuff matters in the postseason. If it did, the Los Angeles Angels would be hosting the Detroit Tigers in Game 1 on Friday night. The ALCS opener will be at Camden Yards and will feature a Cinderella opponent from just outside the Land of Oz because of factors that cannot be appraised with the usual baseball metrics.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
The most despised child in the history of Baltimore sports is all grown up. And, if his beloved New York Yankees falter, he'd like to see the Orioles win the 2012 World Series. Yes, Baltimore - 16 years later, Jeffrey Maier soon could be in your corner. "I'm a baseball fan first, and I still love the Yankees. But if the Orioles get past the Yankees, I'd love to see a Capital-area World Series with the Nats and the Orioles playing each other," said Maier, 28, who now goes by Jeff.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
NEW YORK - When the Yankee Stadium crowd began chanting New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter's name after his final at-bat Wednesday after a routine groundout - trying to coax the future Hall of Famer out of the dugout - Orioles manager Buck Showalter knew it wasn't happening. It wasn't the right time. “He had a tough at-bat, a ground ball back to the pitcher,” Showalter said, “I told a couple of our guys, 'He ain't coming out of the dugout. Just watch.' That's all you need to know about Derek because it didn't fit in the context of what was [happening]
NEWS
By RAYMOND DANIEL BURKE | June 6, 2006
It is an image that has burned itself into television screens all over Baltimore - the shadow vision of an outrageous and blatant robbery, the sting of which 10 years has failed to diminish significantly. It happened Oct. 9, 1996. Returning to the postseason for the first time in 13 years, the Orioles had dispatched the defending league champion and heavily favored Cleveland Indians in the first round to reach the American League Championship Series against the despised New York Yankees.
NEWS
By MIKE KLINGAMAN and MIKE KLINGAMAN,SUN REPORTER | April 26, 2006
Ten years later, Orioles fans remember the play, the kid and the umpire's call. Has it been that long since the team's playoff hopes turned on a 12-year-old's theft of a long fly ball? Since Jeffrey Maier reached over the wall at Yankee Stadium to pick the pocket of an Orioles outfielder? Since the ump twirled his finger, giving Derek Jeter a homer, the Yanks new life and the Orioles cause to loathe a giddy sixth-grader? The bitterness lingers. In baseball chat rooms, Orioles fans still berate Maier for his interference in Game 1 of the 1996 American League Championship Series and bemoan the play they say cost their team the pennant.
FEATURES
September 4, 1997
OLD TAPPAN, N.J. -- The streets wind placidly, the landmarks of suburban familiarity -- McDonald's and Starbucks -- are humming quietly and, with commuters back at work and kids back at school, the residential areas are empty but for UPS drivers and the occasional stay-at-home mom and her toddler.But then, the home of evil is always deceptively peaceful.The Fan, geared up for today's start of the Orioles' four-game series at Yankee Stadium, has come up early in search of The Kid.You know the one -- Jeffrey Maier, then 12 and ditching school to attend the first game of the American League Championship Series last Oct. 9 in the Bronx.
SPORTS
June 6, 2006
Good morning --Jeffrey Maier -- If you get drafted, let's hope an Orioles fan can intercept the call before it reaches you.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | February 13, 2012
Hines Ward may be gone, but he won't soon be forgotten by Ravens fans. Now that the Pittsburgh Steelers have parted ways with the wide receiver and his maddening, ever-present smile, here's a look at some other famous Baltimore sports villains.  Robert Irsay -- Erratic owner who moved the beloved Baltimore Colts to Indianapolis under cover of darkness in March, 1984, breaking a city's heart. Paul Tagliabue -- Cold-hearted NFL commissioner who bluntly suggested, in the wake of the Colts leaving town, that Baltimore should have built a museum rather than pine for a new pro football team.
NEWS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN COLUMNIST | January 11, 1997
Finally, the saga of Jeffrey Maier has revealed a pair of true heroes.Would you believe his parents?True, Richard and Jane Maier raised the little devil who helped change the outcome of Game 1 of the Orioles-New York Yankees American League Championship Series last fall.But to their credit, they have declined numerous offers to profit from the incident, including one from the Upper Deck company to make a Jeffrey Maier baseball card.That's right, the 12-year-old author of the most celebrated fan-interference act in baseball history was going to get a card, just like a player.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Because the Yankees are in town, and shortstop Derek Jeter is retiring at season's end, Orioles manager Buck Showalter fielded questions about Jeter to start his daily media briefing. Showalter was Jeter's first manager in New York. And Showalter said all the right things -- things he has said for years -- about how Jeter does everything the right way and knows how to treat people. But Showalter also had a hilarious aside that I'm sure will make some Orioles fans chuckle. Each team is giving Jeter a going-away present; last year, the Orioles gave retiring closer Mariano Rivera a sculpted broken bat. So what should the Orioles give Jeter?
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
It's funny. As soon as we learned that the Orioles would be playing the Yankees in the ALDS and that they'd be going to the Bronx, I knew I wanted to give Jeff Maier a call. It really had nothing to do with an “anniversary” of the day Maier, then 12, helped a fly ball turn into a game-tying home run in Game 1 of the 1996 ALCS. What people don't realize is that this week is the only other time in the history of the franchises that the Orioles have played the Yankees in the postseason.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
The most despised child in the history of Baltimore sports is all grown up. And, if his beloved New York Yankees falter, he'd like to see the Orioles win the 2012 World Series. Yes, Baltimore - 16 years later, Jeffrey Maier soon could be in your corner. "I'm a baseball fan first, and I still love the Yankees. But if the Orioles get past the Yankees, I'd love to see a Capital-area World Series with the Nats and the Orioles playing each other," said Maier, 28, who now goes by Jeff.
SPORTS
October 8, 2012
Here's a roundup of what other media outlets are saying about the Orioles' loss to the New York Yankees in Game 1 of the American League Division Series and more: • Andrew Marchand of ESPNNewYork.com shares a quote from Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira after Sunday night's game . Considering the two-three format of this best-of-five series, it was imperative that the Yankees get at least one win in Baltimore to avoid returning to...
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Against anyone else, it would have seemed preposterous when the 12-year-old boy's hand reached into the field of play to change the course of the Orioles' 1996 playoff run. Against the New York Yankees? Jeffrey Maier was just another chapter in a long story. The Yankees have almost always been the measuring stick for their divisional rivals 200 miles down Interstate 95. And pardon Orioles fans if they've always felt the game was a little bit rigged, whether by baseball economics or by the dark magic of an adolescent fan. The Bronx Bombers of Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris were still the big boys on the block when the Orioles first got good in the early 1960s.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | February 13, 2012
Hines Ward may be gone, but he won't soon be forgotten by Ravens fans. Now that the Pittsburgh Steelers have parted ways with the wide receiver and his maddening, ever-present smile, here's a look at some other famous Baltimore sports villains.  Robert Irsay -- Erratic owner who moved the beloved Baltimore Colts to Indianapolis under cover of darkness in March, 1984, breaking a city's heart. Paul Tagliabue -- Cold-hearted NFL commissioner who bluntly suggested, in the wake of the Colts leaving town, that Baltimore should have built a museum rather than pine for a new pro football team.
SPORTS
October 8, 2012
Here's a roundup of what other media outlets are saying about the Orioles' loss to the New York Yankees in Game 1 of the American League Division Series and more: • Andrew Marchand of ESPNNewYork.com shares a quote from Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira after Sunday night's game . Considering the two-three format of this best-of-five series, it was imperative that the Yankees get at least one win in Baltimore to avoid returning to...
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
It might be a little late to learn this, but I thought you should know. Jeffrey Maier supports instant replay. Major League Baseball began using it last week to determine whether potential home runs were fair or foul or whether they cleared the wall. And the boy turned man who was involved in one of the most controversial "boundary" calls in the sport's history, certainly the most painful one in the Orioles' 55 years, believes baseball should do whatever it can to get those calls right.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
The Orioles were still talking Wednesday morning about Francisco Cervelli 's disputed home run, which broke a 3-3 tie in the seventh inning of the Yankees' ridiculously rain-delayed 5-3 victory the night before at Yankee Stadium. The play had Jeffrey Maier overtones, with a fan reaching over the fence to interfere with the ball and the umpires calling it a home run. This time, however, they were able to review the play before confirming the call, though that didn't really end the controversy.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
It might be a little late to learn this, but I thought you should know. Jeffrey Maier supports instant replay. Major League Baseball began using it last week to determine whether potential home runs were fair or foul or whether they cleared the wall. And the boy turned man who was involved in one of the most controversial "boundary" calls in the sport's history, certainly the most painful one in the Orioles' 55 years, believes baseball should do whatever it can to get those calls right.
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