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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 29, 2002
Call it cockiness. Conceit. Or maybe just plain naivete. But it's what gives producer Jeffrey Katzenberg the confidence to repeatedly take movie animation where others haven't - but where he's sure audiences will follow. The DreamWorks co-founder, fresh off a Best Animated Feature Oscar for Shrek, is trusting that gambler's luck will remain with him for Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, a combination of traditional two-dimensional and computer-generated three-dimensional animation he believes represents the new frontier for film.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 27, 2004
The fall television season doesn't start until Monday, but one of the most talked about new series of the year could find itself canceled today without ever making it on air. And the person pulling the plug would not be a network programmer, but a California judge. In Los Angeles Superior Court today, the summer's nastiest network fight, over a pair of similar reality boxing shows, may come to a conclusion. The months-long bout has involved NBC, Fox and several big-name Hollywood producers battling over The Next Great Champ, set to premiere Sept.
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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 1994
HOLLYWOOD -- The announcement late Saturday that Michael Eisner, the chairman of Walt Disney Co., had undergone emergency quadruple heart bypass surgery stunned Hollywood and the financial community, and raised immediate questions about the management of one of the world's most successful -- and, up to now, stable -- entertainment companies.Mr. Eisner, 52, underwent the three-hour surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles earlier Saturday.His surgeon, Dr. Alfredo Trento, said, "The operation was a normal bypass procedure without any complications."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 22, 2004
NEW YORK - Jeffrey Katzenberg plans to take the animation unit of DreamWorks SKG public in a $650 million initial public offering that will allow the studio to double its film production and increase its challenge to Walt Disney Co. Katzenberg, 53, who helped found DreamWorks in 1994 after he reportedly was passed over for president of the Walt Disney Co., will become chief executive and control the new company, DreamWorks Animation Inc. The sale, the...
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | December 21, 1998
Jeffrey Katzenberg says it's the "most demanding, absolutely hardest job that any actor can be asked to do." He's referring to the process of making one's voice fit an animated cartoon character.At first, you're tempted to think, well, Jeffrey Katzenberg would say that. As a guiding spirit behind the explosion of full-length animated features that's resounded throughout the '90s, Katzenberg feels an understandable propriety toward the whole process of building the perfect big-screen cartoon.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 22, 2004
NEW YORK - Jeffrey Katzenberg plans to take the animation unit of DreamWorks SKG public in a $650 million initial public offering that will allow the studio to double its film production and increase its challenge to Walt Disney Co. Katzenberg, 53, who helped found DreamWorks in 1994 after he reportedly was passed over for president of the Walt Disney Co., will become chief executive and control the new company, DreamWorks Animation Inc. The sale, the...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 27, 2004
The fall television season doesn't start until Monday, but one of the most talked about new series of the year could find itself canceled today without ever making it on air. And the person pulling the plug would not be a network programmer, but a California judge. In Los Angeles Superior Court today, the summer's nastiest network fight, over a pair of similar reality boxing shows, may come to a conclusion. The months-long bout has involved NBC, Fox and several big-name Hollywood producers battling over The Next Great Champ, set to premiere Sept.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Dailey News | May 30, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Four months ago a handful of studio chiefs complained that movies cost too much and promised to institute cost-containment.Warner Bros.' Robert Daly said that his studio would play hardball in negotiations with directors and lesser-known stars.Then-Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank Mancuso indicated that he would put fewer scripts into development.And Walt Disney's Jeffrey Katzenberg issued a 28-page memo that called for the studio to return to basics -- "a good story, well-executed."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | August 30, 2004
Score one for The Next Great Champ. A Los Angeles judge cleared the way for Fox TV's new boxing reality series to debut Sept. 7, refusing to grant a preliminary injunction sought by Mark Burnett and Jeffrey Katzenberg, producers of a rival NBC series, The Contender. Burnett and Katzenberg, whose series is scheduled to premiere in November, sought the injunction on the grounds that Fox had violated California boxing regulations in its rush to get Champ on-air before their show. While that was the core of their court case, the real fight was over the claim by producers and NBC that Fox stole the idea for its boxing series from them.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 25, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Walt Disney's animation classic "Fantasia" will be updated with several new segments now being created for release in 1996-97, it was recently announced.The revamped version, to be called "Fantasia Continued," will fulfill Disney's original wish to keep the 1941 film fresh by periodically replacing some old segments with new ones, the studio said in a news release."We would . . . change the program just like the ballet does," Disney said when "Fantasia" was released.Details about the new segments and which old ones would be dropped were not released.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 29, 2002
Call it cockiness. Conceit. Or maybe just plain naivete. But it's what gives producer Jeffrey Katzenberg the confidence to repeatedly take movie animation where others haven't - but where he's sure audiences will follow. The DreamWorks co-founder, fresh off a Best Animated Feature Oscar for Shrek, is trusting that gambler's luck will remain with him for Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, a combination of traditional two-dimensional and computer-generated three-dimensional animation he believes represents the new frontier for film.
FEATURES
By Gene Seymour and Gene Seymour,NEWSDAY | December 21, 1998
Jeffrey Katzenberg says it's the "most demanding, absolutely hardest job that any actor can be asked to do." He's referring to the process of making one's voice fit an animated cartoon character.At first, you're tempted to think, well, Jeffrey Katzenberg would say that. As a guiding spirit behind the explosion of full-length animated features that's resounded throughout the '90s, Katzenberg feels an understandable propriety toward the whole process of building the perfect big-screen cartoon.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 1994
HOLLYWOOD -- The announcement late Saturday that Michael Eisner, the chairman of Walt Disney Co., had undergone emergency quadruple heart bypass surgery stunned Hollywood and the financial community, and raised immediate questions about the management of one of the world's most successful -- and, up to now, stable -- entertainment companies.Mr. Eisner, 52, underwent the three-hour surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles earlier Saturday.His surgeon, Dr. Alfredo Trento, said, "The operation was a normal bypass procedure without any complications."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 29, 2003
Two nationally known members of Boston University's board of trustees have resigned amid the crisis gripping the university over whether Daniel S. Goldin will be allowed to take the president's office. Kenneth Feld, owner of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, and Jeffrey Katzenberg, a founder of the Hollywood studio DreamWorks SKG, both resigned last week, BU confirmed yesterday. The two were among the highest-profile members of the board and represented some of its deepest pockets.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- A labor dispute at the Century Plaza Hotel in Century City left Hollywood producers scrambling to find other venues to stage their annual black-tie awards shows. The Producers Guild of America, which had scheduled its show at the hotel for Jan. 22, found a last-minute reprieve when the new owners of Culver Studios offered one of its large sound stages for the producers' dinner as well as its historic New York street on the back lot for guests to mingle and drink cocktails before and after the show.
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