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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The last person you may ever want to spend an evening with is Jeffrey Dahmer, the serial killer of boys and young men. Although the world learned what went on behind the door of Apt. 213 on N. 25th St. in Milwaukee after a would-be victim escaped in 1991, no one has ever really learned what went on in Dahmer's head. Joseph W. Ritsch, co-founder of the recently formed Iron Crow Theatre, has attempted to peer into that psyche. His new play, "Apartment 213," is an absorbing, if not entirely satisfying, work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
The last person you may ever want to spend an evening with is Jeffrey Dahmer, the serial killer of boys and young men. Although the world learned what went on behind the door of Apt. 213 on N. 25th St. in Milwaukee after a would-be victim escaped in 1991, no one has ever really learned what went on in Dahmer's head. Joseph W. Ritsch, co-founder of the recently formed Iron Crow Theatre, has attempted to peer into that psyche. His new play, "Apartment 213," is an absorbing, if not entirely satisfying, work.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 6, 2002
WASHINGTON -- It ought to tell you something that Abraham Montalvo Sr. felt compelled to apologize. He had not, after all, done anything wrong. He wasn't the man who cased a rural Nebraska bank, nor was he one of the three who subsequently stormed that bank Sept. 26, guns blasting, to slaughter five people. No, he's just a guy from the community in question -- Norfolk, northeast of Lincoln. The only thing Mr. Montalvo had in common with the four men arrested for the crime -- Jorge Galindo, Erick Fernando Vela, Jose Sandoval and Gabriel Rodriguez -- was a Hispanic name.
NEWS
By Irwin J. Mansdorf | October 22, 2002
RA'ANANA, Israel - Following the news these days isn't very encouraging for those that thought al-Qaida was finished. Marines attacked in Kuwait, a tanker blasted in Yemen, a nightclub struck in Bali, bombs in the Philippines. Doesn't seem to be much doubt that terror is alive and kicking. Just read the papers, listen to the radio or watch television. For those who thought Osama bin Laden and cohorts were gone, a rude awakening is in place. So when someone is wreaking havoc and sniping away in the suburbs of America's capital, why is it that no one thinks of this as terror?
NEWS
By Irwin J. Mansdorf | October 22, 2002
RA'ANANA, Israel - Following the news these days isn't very encouraging for those that thought al-Qaida was finished. Marines attacked in Kuwait, a tanker blasted in Yemen, a nightclub struck in Bali, bombs in the Philippines. Doesn't seem to be much doubt that terror is alive and kicking. Just read the papers, listen to the radio or watch television. For those who thought Osama bin Laden and cohorts were gone, a rude awakening is in place. So when someone is wreaking havoc and sniping away in the suburbs of America's capital, why is it that no one thinks of this as terror?
FEATURES
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to The Sun | March 9, 1994
If you're a believer in the pop culture marketplace, then you nTC know that no one loves a murderer like an American does.Popular iconography includes Billy the Kid, John Dillinger, and Bonnie and Clyde. But even those deemed too weird, psychotic or unredeemable for mass hero worship -- Chessman, DeSalvo, Gacy, Bundy -- have had their followings.They are written about, read about, studied by psychiatrists, law enforcers and loners. Recently serial killers have been put on the faces of a line of trading cards.
NEWS
June 11, 2012
I was not downtown during the recent disturbances, but I will take Del. Pat McDonough's word that the groups of young thugs were, in fact, black ("Baltimore and bigotry," May 18). Here is the point I want to make: The fact that they were black had nothing to do with their despicable behavior. In recent coverage of the meth lab bust, did anyone refer to the accused as a group of white drug peddlers? How about Oklahoma City bombers Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, or serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer, did their "whiteness" have something to do with their behavior?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 29, 1994
Jeffrey L. Dahmer is dead, but the legal battle over his estate is still alive.Several families of Mr. Dahmer's victims sued him and were awarded millions of dollars, and ever since have been trying to gain control of the contents of his Milwaukee apartment, where he killed most of his victims.The families want to auction off some 312 items, including a 55-gallon vat he used to decompose the bodies; the refrigerator where he stored hearts; a saw, a hammer and his toothbrush.Tom Jacobson, the lawyer for the families, said the auction could bring more than $100,000.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 31, 1992
SANTA ROSA, Calif. -- Relatives of crime victims and their advocates are condemning a small company's decision to publish trading cards featuring serial killers and mass murderers.The trading cards, similar to those featuring baseball players, are to be released in May and will include the stories and color portraits of such convicted killers as Ted Bundy and Ramon Salcido, and accused mass murderer Jeffrey Dahmer.Bundy, who admitted killing 20 women, was executed Jan. 24, 1989 in Florida.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch | December 14, 2003
Tapes of former President Richard M. Nixon's White House conversations released by the National Archives this past week include an intriguing exchange with his chief of staff, H.R. Haldeman, at Camp David in August 1972. In discussing Ronald Reagan, who had just made an unsuccessful run for the Republican presidential nomination, Nixon observes: "[H]e's just an uncomfortable man to be around -- strange." One cannot help wondering what other great moments in self-awareness might emerge elsewhere in the news: Michael Jackson: "Yeah, he's a nice guy, but a little weird ..."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 6, 2002
WASHINGTON -- It ought to tell you something that Abraham Montalvo Sr. felt compelled to apologize. He had not, after all, done anything wrong. He wasn't the man who cased a rural Nebraska bank, nor was he one of the three who subsequently stormed that bank Sept. 26, guns blasting, to slaughter five people. No, he's just a guy from the community in question -- Norfolk, northeast of Lincoln. The only thing Mr. Montalvo had in common with the four men arrested for the crime -- Jorge Galindo, Erick Fernando Vela, Jose Sandoval and Gabriel Rodriguez -- was a Hispanic name.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 14, 1992
"The Jeffrey Dahmer Murders" will not be coming to a theater near you -- at least not any time soon.The judge who presided over the notorious case of the Wisconsin candymaker-turned-cannibal had planned to write a book and authorize a screenplay based upon his accounts. But the mother of one of Dahmer's 17 victims is trying to stop the publication, and survivors of other victims have filed suits seeking to prevent Dahmer from profiting by selling the rights to his story.Martha Hicks of Akron, Ohio, whose son Steven was killed by Dahmer in 1978, has asked the Wisconsin Judicial Commission to investigate a possible conflict of interest charge against Judge Laurence C. Gram, who presided in the case, based upon her belief that he might have been prejudiced in his rulings, knowing he would later try and capitalize on his experience.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | October 7, 1997
Hey, heard the one about Princess Diana?Odds are, you haven't.In America, the land of Chernobyl jokes ("What has feathers and glows in the dark? Chicken Kiev"), Challenger jokes, Jeffrey Dahmer jokes, O.J. Simpson jokes and Waco jokes, it turns out that something is sacred after all.Over the past decade, thanks to faxes, phones and computers, almost any disaster is followed by a spate of sick jokes practically before the dust clears.But not this time. People don't want to hear them, say researchers who study humor.
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