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By Chicago Tribune | March 21, 2009
Citigroup Inc. moved to seize one of General Growth Properties Inc.'s shopping malls in Louisiana after the Chicago-based shopping mall operator missed payment on a $95 million loan. General Growth owns most of the Baltimore area's regional malls, including Harborplace and Towson Town Center, and is Columbia's master developer. It operates more than 200 malls nationwide and has been warning investors since November that it may have to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection if it cannot renegotiate its debts.
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BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | March 21, 2009
Citigroup Inc. moved to seize one of General Growth Properties Inc.'s shopping malls in Louisiana after the Chicago-based shopping mall operator missed payment on a $95 million loan. General Growth owns most of the Baltimore area's regional malls, including Harborplace and Towson Town Center, and is Columbia's master developer. It operates more than 200 malls nationwide and has been warning investors since November that it may have to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection if it cannot renegotiate its debts.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
With hundreds of doctors and nurses staffing health centers for Hurricane Katrina victims just south of New Orleans, Maryland has become "a guardian angel," Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard said yesterday. Broussard has been an outspoken critic of federal relief efforts - he suggested on NBC's Meet the Press last week that "whoever is at the top of this totem pole, that totem pole needs to be chain-sawed off" - but he had considerably nicer things to say about Maryland's contribution to his parish's recovery.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court reversed yesterday the murder conviction of a black Louisiana death-row inmate on the grounds that racial bias had infected the selection of his jury. The 7-2 decision is the court's latest effort to press trial judges to intervene when a prosecutor moves to exclude blacks from the trial of a black defendant. In yesterday's opinion, the court said a trial judge in Jefferson Parish, La., "committed clear error" by sitting idly while prosecutor James A. Williams excluded all the blacks in the jury pool for the 1996 trial of Allen Snyder, an African-American accused of fatally stabbing a man dating his estranged wife and of wounding her. The same prosecutor also referred to the trial as "his O.J. Simpson case" because, he said, the facts were "very, very similar" to the murder case in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
About 20 emergency response and communications personnel from Anne Arundel County arrived in the Gulf Coast area yesterday, adding to the Maryland contingent of doctors and nurses that is providing relief to the hurricane-stricken states. The county group will use its new Mobile Command and Control Unit truck to link the communications systems of emergency personnel providing relief efforts in Jefferson Parish, an area on the southern edge of New Orleans. The 27-ton, $820,000 truck will enable different agencies - such as the National Guard, Jefferson Parish police and hospital workers - to talk to each other through different media, such as satellite phones, cell phones and walkie-talkies.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 20, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court reversed yesterday the murder conviction of a black Louisiana death-row inmate on the grounds that racial bias had infected the selection of his jury. The 7-2 decision is the court's latest effort to press trial judges to intervene when a prosecutor moves to exclude blacks from the trial of a black defendant. In yesterday's opinion, the court said a trial judge in Jefferson Parish, La., "committed clear error" by sitting idly while prosecutor James A. Williams excluded all the blacks in the jury pool for the 1996 trial of Allen Snyder, an African-American accused of fatally stabbing a man dating his estranged wife and of wounding her. The same prosecutor also referred to the trial as "his O.J. Simpson case" because, he said, the facts were "very, very similar" to the murder case in Los Angeles.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Aaron F. Broussard, the president of a Louisiana parish where hundreds of Marylanders helped in the days after Katrina, got a warm welcome from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday and the unusual honor of a speaking slot in the middle of his State of the State address. But the veteran politician from the suburbs of New Orleans appears in danger of wearing out his welcome at home in Jefferson Parish. In the past few months, he has been heaped with blame for his decision to evacuate pump operators during the storm and criticized for exaggerating in an appearance on NBC's Meet the Press.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
The phone and electric lines were down. The towers that relay cell phone calls were not working. In the days after Hurricane Katrina struck, portions of the Gulf Coast were isolated from the rest of the world. The situation seemed like a perfect test for Anne Arundel County's new Mobile Command and Control Unit. Responding last month to one of the Louisiana communities hardest hit by Katrina, Jefferson Parish, 10 county fire personnel were among a group that took the unit there and performed disaster relief -- not with ladders and hoses, but with laptops and digital phones.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Days after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast region, students at McDonogh School emptied more than $1,000 in change from their pockets into a bucket. Last week, they raised money by selling light-up buttons depicting the school mascot. Next Monday, lower-school children will start collecting coins in water cooler jugs. Kids and adults all over the world have contributed money and resources to help storm victims. But the students at McDonogh, by raising money for a school outside New Orleans, are also bringing together for the first time two institutions with a common heritage.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | October 31, 1994
For generations, New Orleans and its neighboring ''parishes'' (counties) have been at each other's throats -- the city acting its role as the racially and socially tolerant play-city of North America; the parishes trumpeting political conservatism and periodically electing white-supremacy candidates.But when New Orleans' new black mayor, Marc Morial, made a recent political and financial foray to Washington and New York, he had two interesting traveling partners.One was Michael J. Yenni, president of Jefferson Parish.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Aaron F. Broussard, the president of a Louisiana parish where hundreds of Marylanders helped in the days after Katrina, got a warm welcome from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. yesterday and the unusual honor of a speaking slot in the middle of his State of the State address. But the veteran politician from the suburbs of New Orleans appears in danger of wearing out his welcome at home in Jefferson Parish. In the past few months, he has been heaped with blame for his decision to evacuate pump operators during the storm and criticized for exaggerating in an appearance on NBC's Meet the Press.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Days after Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast region, students at McDonogh School emptied more than $1,000 in change from their pockets into a bucket. Last week, they raised money by selling light-up buttons depicting the school mascot. Next Monday, lower-school children will start collecting coins in water cooler jugs. Kids and adults all over the world have contributed money and resources to help storm victims. But the students at McDonogh, by raising money for a school outside New Orleans, are also bringing together for the first time two institutions with a common heritage.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2005
The phone and electric lines were down. The towers that relay cell phone calls were not working. In the days after Hurricane Katrina struck, portions of the Gulf Coast were isolated from the rest of the world. The situation seemed like a perfect test for Anne Arundel County's new Mobile Command and Control Unit. Responding last month to one of the Louisiana communities hardest hit by Katrina, Jefferson Parish, 10 county fire personnel were among a group that took the unit there and performed disaster relief -- not with ladders and hoses, but with laptops and digital phones.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2005
With hundreds of doctors and nurses staffing health centers for Hurricane Katrina victims just south of New Orleans, Maryland has become "a guardian angel," Jefferson Parish President Aaron Broussard said yesterday. Broussard has been an outspoken critic of federal relief efforts - he suggested on NBC's Meet the Press last week that "whoever is at the top of this totem pole, that totem pole needs to be chain-sawed off" - but he had considerably nicer things to say about Maryland's contribution to his parish's recovery.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2005
The Internet posting is ominous: An insulin-dependent diabetic in his 70s has wandered away from family members amid the miseries of the New Orleans convention center and hasn't been heard from since Sunday. Days after posting that message, Bryant Woods of Odenton was still waiting for word of his father, Alphonse Woods Sr., who had evacuated from his home near the French Quarter to seek shelter from Hurricane Katrina. The younger Woods is among dozens of people in Maryland who have turned to the Internet to try to re-establish contact with friends or family on the Gulf Coast, where phone service is out in many areas.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2005
About 20 emergency response and communications personnel from Anne Arundel County arrived in the Gulf Coast area yesterday, adding to the Maryland contingent of doctors and nurses that is providing relief to the hurricane-stricken states. The county group will use its new Mobile Command and Control Unit truck to link the communications systems of emergency personnel providing relief efforts in Jefferson Parish, an area on the southern edge of New Orleans. The 27-ton, $820,000 truck will enable different agencies - such as the National Guard, Jefferson Parish police and hospital workers - to talk to each other through different media, such as satellite phones, cell phones and walkie-talkies.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2005
The Internet posting is ominous: An insulin-dependent diabetic in his 70s has wandered away from family members amid the miseries of the New Orleans convention center and hasn't been heard from since Sunday. Days after posting that message, Bryant Woods of Odenton was still waiting for word of his father, Alphonse Woods Sr., who had evacuated from his home near the French Quarter to seek shelter from Hurricane Katrina. The younger Woods is among dozens of people in Maryland who have turned to the Internet to try to re-establish contact with friends or family on the Gulf Coast, where phone service is out in many areas.
SPORTS
March 28, 1991
Milutinovic named U.S. soccer coachBora Milutinovic, a Yugoslav who has coached the World Cup teams of Mexico and Costa Rica, was named coach of the U.S. national soccer team yesterday. He replaced Bob Gansler, who resigned last month after two years in the job.The U.S. team will be host of the 1994 World Cup, thus qualifying automatically for the tournament. Milutinovic's contract with the U.S. Soccer Federation, which runs through December 1994, is reportedly for about $200,000 a year and includes incentive bonuses.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2005
Maryland volunteers streamed south yesterday to bring desperately needed supplies and skills to the hurricane-stricken Gulf Coast, as a Baltimore college offered tuition-free enrollment to up to 100 students displaced by the storm. One week after Hurricane Katrina slammed ashore in Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana, 70 doctors, nurses and pharmacists flew to the region to provide medical help, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced. The caregivers were bound for Jefferson Parish - a particularly hard-hit section of southern Louisiana - on two Maryland National Guard C-130s.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
By yesterday morning, 24 hours after Hurricane Katrina had unleashed its fury upon New Orleans, the editors and staff of The Times-Picayune, Louisiana's biggest newspaper, decided it was time to go. In a message posted on its Web log at 9:40 a.m., the paper announced it was evacuating its headquarters on Howard Avenue: "Water continues to rise around our building, as it is throughout the region. We want to evacuate our employees and families while we are still able to safely leave our building."
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