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By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | November 12, 2000
Myths die hard, because credulous men desperately need mythology to make sense of events that reason cannot explain.And nowhere does romantic mythology remain more obstinately embedded than in the Old Confederacy, where, as the late C. Vann Woodward used to impishly say, "a dedicated priesthood jealously guards its special brand of Shintoism -- the worship of ancestors." Is it any wonder that in such a pervasive reverential atmosphere, battles still rage across the South over and under the Confederate flag?
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NEWS
April 11, 2011
In response to Leonard Pitts, Jr.'s column ("What was Civil War about? Listen to the voices of the Confederacy," April 10), it should be noted that political motivation and post hoc justifications are often fluid, and evil, sadly, is often relative. President Lincoln famously said he didn't care about freeing the slaves, but only about saving the Union. Despite this, Mr. Lincoln well knew that the one could not be accomplished without the other. While some of the Union side harangued about the evils of slavery, they were blind to the North's complicity, exploiting slave-grown cotton for mills with dangerous machinery often operated by children, typically white European immigrants, as young as 8 laboring for 16-hours-a-day, often 7 days a week.
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NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | December 22, 1990
WITH A SERENDIPITY rarely seen in the book business, a small Baltimore publishing house has come out with a centennial reissue of the memoirs of Mrs. Jefferson Davis, the First Lady of the Confederacy, just as renewed interest in the Civil War is peaking.This fortuitous republication is due in part to the local descendants of a Jewish businessman whom Varina Davis revered as one of her benefactors when the Confederacy was collapsing, and whose grandson-in-law later founded the fortune that led to the Baltimore Museum of Art's incomparable Cone Collection of Matisses, Picassos and other treasures.
TOPIC
By Curtis Wilkie and Curtis Wilkie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott's apologies for endorsing the Dixiecrat movement of 1948 is not the first time the Republican leader has had to back away from remarks that demonstrate his affinity for the Lost Cause of the Confederacy and its segregationist heritage. In 1981, when Lott was a ranking conservative congressman from Mississippi, he managed to embarrass President Ronald Reagan by encouraging the administration to reverse a government policy that denied tax-exempt status to private schools practicing racial discrimination.
NEWS
April 11, 2011
In response to Leonard Pitts, Jr.'s column ("What was Civil War about? Listen to the voices of the Confederacy," April 10), it should be noted that political motivation and post hoc justifications are often fluid, and evil, sadly, is often relative. President Lincoln famously said he didn't care about freeing the slaves, but only about saving the Union. Despite this, Mr. Lincoln well knew that the one could not be accomplished without the other. While some of the Union side harangued about the evils of slavery, they were blind to the North's complicity, exploiting slave-grown cotton for mills with dangerous machinery often operated by children, typically white European immigrants, as young as 8 laboring for 16-hours-a-day, often 7 days a week.
TOPIC
By Curtis Wilkie and Curtis Wilkie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 2002
Sen. Trent Lott's apologies for endorsing the Dixiecrat movement of 1948 is not the first time the Republican leader has had to back away from remarks that demonstrate his affinity for the Lost Cause of the Confederacy and its segregationist heritage. In 1981, when Lott was a ranking conservative congressman from Mississippi, he managed to embarrass President Ronald Reagan by encouraging the administration to reverse a government policy that denied tax-exempt status to private schools practicing racial discrimination.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 29, 1995
Top-ranked Southern of Baltimore survived the slowdown tactics of defending Delaware State champion St. Mark's to post a 32-22 victory in a first-round game of the Power Series at the Slam Dunk To The Beach Tournament in Lewes, Del.Kofi Pointer scored 11 to lead the Bulldogs, who advance to the championship game tomorrow against Pleasantville (N.J.), which defeated No. 2 St. Frances Wednesday, spoiling a matchup of the Baltimore area's two top teams in the championship."We showed some poise and didn't get rattled by their slowdown," said Southern coach Meredith Smith.
FEATURES
By SCOTT MCCAFFREY and SCOTT MCCAFFREY,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1996
ELLENTON, Fla. -- Being foreign-born and married to a French Catholic wife woman could be enough to get a Southerner ostracized from polite society in the years before the Civil War. Being a Jew seemingly would be a kiss of death in politics or business.Yet Judah Benjamin survived and thrived, arguably becoming an the second most important political figure of the Confederacy. during the waning days of the war.After the Union victory, while others like Jefferson Davis were captured and jailed, Benjamin escaped to the Caribbean and then to England, where he made carved out a second illustrious career for himself.
NEWS
By Vincent T. Fitzpatrick | May 17, 1992
JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON: A CIVIL WAR BIOGRAPHY.Craig L. Symonds.Norton.450 pages. $29.95. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was likened to Julius Caesar and hailed, in 1862, as "the only man who can save the Confederacy." But, two years later, having retreated before General Sherman's onslaught in Georgia, Johnston was ignominiously relieved of command of the Army of Tennessee.His critics had quipped that he would stop retreating only when he reached the Gulf of Mexico. Johnston was, in brief, one of the most enigmatic and controversial commanders on either side during the Civil War.He had impeccable credentials.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
After the death of former president of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis from a bronchial ailment in New Orleans in 1889, one of Baltimore's best-known black citizens found himself a legatee of the late Confederate leader's estate. Frederick B. McGinnis, born into slavery in Charleston, S.C., had been a servant to Davis during his incarceration at Fortress Monroe, Va., after the end of the Civil War. He served Davis for nearly two years during his confinement in a damp casement at the fort, and briefly stayed with his family after Davis' release before moving to Baltimore to work in a similar capacity for B&O Railroad grandee John Work Garrett.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
After the death of former president of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis from a bronchial ailment in New Orleans in 1889, one of Baltimore's best-known black citizens found himself a legatee of the late Confederate leader's estate. Frederick B. McGinnis, born into slavery in Charleston, S.C., had been a servant to Davis during his incarceration at Fortress Monroe, Va., after the end of the Civil War. He served Davis for nearly two years during his confinement in a damp casement at the fort, and briefly stayed with his family after Davis' release before moving to Baltimore to work in a similar capacity for B&O Railroad grandee John Work Garrett.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and By Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | November 12, 2000
Myths die hard, because credulous men desperately need mythology to make sense of events that reason cannot explain.And nowhere does romantic mythology remain more obstinately embedded than in the Old Confederacy, where, as the late C. Vann Woodward used to impishly say, "a dedicated priesthood jealously guards its special brand of Shintoism -- the worship of ancestors." Is it any wonder that in such a pervasive reverential atmosphere, battles still rage across the South over and under the Confederate flag?
FEATURES
By SCOTT MCCAFFREY and SCOTT MCCAFFREY,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1996
ELLENTON, Fla. -- Being foreign-born and married to a French Catholic wife woman could be enough to get a Southerner ostracized from polite society in the years before the Civil War. Being a Jew seemingly would be a kiss of death in politics or business.Yet Judah Benjamin survived and thrived, arguably becoming an the second most important political figure of the Confederacy. during the waning days of the war.After the Union victory, while others like Jefferson Davis were captured and jailed, Benjamin escaped to the Caribbean and then to England, where he made carved out a second illustrious career for himself.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 29, 1995
Top-ranked Southern of Baltimore survived the slowdown tactics of defending Delaware State champion St. Mark's to post a 32-22 victory in a first-round game of the Power Series at the Slam Dunk To The Beach Tournament in Lewes, Del.Kofi Pointer scored 11 to lead the Bulldogs, who advance to the championship game tomorrow against Pleasantville (N.J.), which defeated No. 2 St. Frances Wednesday, spoiling a matchup of the Baltimore area's two top teams in the championship."We showed some poise and didn't get rattled by their slowdown," said Southern coach Meredith Smith.
NEWS
By Vincent T. Fitzpatrick | May 17, 1992
JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON: A CIVIL WAR BIOGRAPHY.Craig L. Symonds.Norton.450 pages. $29.95. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston was likened to Julius Caesar and hailed, in 1862, as "the only man who can save the Confederacy." But, two years later, having retreated before General Sherman's onslaught in Georgia, Johnston was ignominiously relieved of command of the Army of Tennessee.His critics had quipped that he would stop retreating only when he reached the Gulf of Mexico. Johnston was, in brief, one of the most enigmatic and controversial commanders on either side during the Civil War.He had impeccable credentials.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | December 22, 1990
WITH A SERENDIPITY rarely seen in the book business, a small Baltimore publishing house has come out with a centennial reissue of the memoirs of Mrs. Jefferson Davis, the First Lady of the Confederacy, just as renewed interest in the Civil War is peaking.This fortuitous republication is due in part to the local descendants of a Jewish businessman whom Varina Davis revered as one of her benefactors when the Confederacy was collapsing, and whose grandson-in-law later founded the fortune that led to the Baltimore Museum of Art's incomparable Cone Collection of Matisses, Picassos and other treasures.
NEWS
December 16, 2003
On Saturday, December 13, 2003, ELIZABETH B. "BETTE" DIXON, 63, of Fredericksburg VA and a native of Baltimore, passed away at Mary Washington Hospital in Fredericksburg. She was an Executive Secretary with McLane Mid-Atlantic, where she had been employed for the past 30 years. Locally she is survived by a sister Sunny Adams and her husband Frank of Upperco, MD. A Memorial Service will be held at 3 P.M. on Saturday, December 20, in the Covenant Funeral Service Chapel, 4801 Jefferson Davis Highway, Fredericksburg, VA 22408.
NEWS
July 18, 2006
On Saturday, July 15, 2006 ROBERT HENRY WOOLDRIDGE, JR., of Silver Spring, MD beloved husband of Valerie Wooldridge; devoted father of Robert Henry Wooldridge, III and Linley Wooldridge; loving son of Robert, Sr. and Beverly Wooldridge of Cape Cod, MA; cherished brother of Wendy (Bob) Boyer of Baltimore, MD; uncle of Sarah, Sammy and Chelsea; son-in-law of Roland and Jaclyn Leimbach of Silver Spring, MD; brother-in-law of Jennifer Raymond of Silver Spring, MD. Friends may call at the Hines Rinaldi Funeral Home, 11800 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, Wednesday July 19 2-4 and 6-8. Funeral services will be held at Church of Our Saviour, 1700 Powder Mill Road, Silver Spring, MD Thursday, July 20 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA)
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