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NEWS
February 24, 1994
"Papa" John Creach, 76, a violinist best known for his work with the San Francisco-based rock group Jefferson Airplane, died Tuesday in Los Angeles. He performed with Jefferson Airplane from 1970 to 1972 and with Airplane members in the group Hot Tuna from 1971 to 1973. Jefferson Airplane later became known as Jefferson Starship and eventually Starship. He had toured with Starship since 1992.* Lt. Gen. Johannes Steinhoff, 80, one of the Luftwaffe's fighter aces of World War II and a mover in rebuilding the postwar German military under NATO auspices, died Monday in Bonn, Germany.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | August 19, 2007
In the shorthand version of rock 'n' roll history, one thing happened four decades ago - The Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, forever changing the face of rock music. But, as important as Sgt. Pepper's was - and is - it was only one of numerous iconic albums released in 1967, a year that might be the most important in the history of this popular musical form. The music produced that year still reverberates 40 years later. Some of its albums sound as if they could have been made yesterday.
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NEWS
April 19, 1999
Skip Spence, 52, an original member of the rock band Jefferson Airplane, died of lung cancer Friday at Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz, Calif., where he had been fighting a number of ailments.His death occurred weeks before the release of "More Oar," a CD tribute to Mr. Spence including songs by Beck, Robert Plant, Tom Waits and members of R.E.M. The recording was inspired by "Oar," Mr. Spence's folk-psychedelic solo album from 1969, which will soon be reissued.Mr. Spence had long battled schizophrenia and alcoholism.
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | July 19, 2006
There's no crying in baseball. And not much quiet time either. "I think of it as a big, huge wedding reception," said Bob "Woody" Popik, describing his job as stadium disc jockey at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. "Because the crowd is diverse, like a wedding. If you play a wide variety of music, everybody's happy." Baseball executives - and their counterparts in every other professional sport with the possible exception of golf - abhor silence. Fans have grown accustomed to having their games with a side order of sound bites.
NEWS
By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
"Beneath the Diamond Sky," by Barney Hoskyns. Simon & Schuster. 221 pages. $30.When discussing politics and history, one needs to establish some credentials, and so to clear the deck in this department, I should say that I come to reading "Beneath the Diamond Sky" as someone who graduated from Berkeley in 1967. I remember, for instance, going to Oakland in these years to sell a motorcycle to the Hell's Angels, who were then living in a house with the Jefferson Airplane, and part of the negotiation, as I recall, had to do with the Angels taking out a baggy of pills, of unknown identity, and passing them around.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1994
Ocean City--This is the way summer officially ends in Ocean City: Not with a whimper, but a bang (apologies to T. S. Eliot). The Beach Boys, Dion and Starship will put on an end-of-summer concert on the beach Saturday, Sept. 3."I think we're at least going to match last year's number," says Ocean City's tourism director, Bob Rothermel. "Last year it drew 10,000 people. We may even draw more than that."Labor Day weekend is a difficult one to predict, he says, because of the changing date each year (the first Monday in September moves around the calendar)
FEATURES
By Jeff Warner and Jeff Warner,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 1, 1998
The other day a kid zipped by me on his bike, and I froze. Kid and bike were gone in a flash, so I thought it was my imagination. Then I saw a story in the news: My Sting Ray bike was back, part of the retro craze that revived lava lamps and bell bottoms.Adventures on that bike are some of my fondest memories of childhood, memories of fun, flight and freedom. I still can recall the day Mom took me to Sears. We bought the bike fully assembled, and I walked it through the mall to the car, beaming with pride.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Reporter | August 19, 2007
In the shorthand version of rock 'n' roll history, one thing happened four decades ago - The Beatles released Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, forever changing the face of rock music. But, as important as Sgt. Pepper's was - and is - it was only one of numerous iconic albums released in 1967, a year that might be the most important in the history of this popular musical form. The music produced that year still reverberates 40 years later. Some of its albums sound as if they could have been made yesterday.
FEATURES
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN REPORTER | July 19, 2006
There's no crying in baseball. And not much quiet time either. "I think of it as a big, huge wedding reception," said Bob "Woody" Popik, describing his job as stadium disc jockey at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. "Because the crowd is diverse, like a wedding. If you play a wide variety of music, everybody's happy." Baseball executives - and their counterparts in every other professional sport with the possible exception of golf - abhor silence. Fans have grown accustomed to having their games with a side order of sound bites.
NEWS
November 18, 1994
Paul Arbiso, 99, the bell-ringer who for decades heralded the annual return of the swallows to Mission San Juan Capistrano in California, died Monday of liver cancer. Each March 19, St. Joseph's Day, he chose the moment to ring the old mission bells to signal the symbolic sighting of the first swallow returning from Argentina after winter migration.Dino Valenti, 57, lead singer of the rock group Quicksilver Messenger Service and writer of the popular song "Get Together," died Wednesday in Santa Rosa, Calif.
NEWS
April 19, 1999
Skip Spence, 52, an original member of the rock band Jefferson Airplane, died of lung cancer Friday at Dominican Hospital in Santa Cruz, Calif., where he had been fighting a number of ailments.His death occurred weeks before the release of "More Oar," a CD tribute to Mr. Spence including songs by Beck, Robert Plant, Tom Waits and members of R.E.M. The recording was inspired by "Oar," Mr. Spence's folk-psychedelic solo album from 1969, which will soon be reissued.Mr. Spence had long battled schizophrenia and alcoholism.
FEATURES
By Jeff Warner and Jeff Warner,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 1, 1998
The other day a kid zipped by me on his bike, and I froze. Kid and bike were gone in a flash, so I thought it was my imagination. Then I saw a story in the news: My Sting Ray bike was back, part of the retro craze that revived lava lamps and bell bottoms.Adventures on that bike are some of my fondest memories of childhood, memories of fun, flight and freedom. I still can recall the day Mom took me to Sears. We bought the bike fully assembled, and I walked it through the mall to the car, beaming with pride.
NEWS
By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
"Beneath the Diamond Sky," by Barney Hoskyns. Simon & Schuster. 221 pages. $30.When discussing politics and history, one needs to establish some credentials, and so to clear the deck in this department, I should say that I come to reading "Beneath the Diamond Sky" as someone who graduated from Berkeley in 1967. I remember, for instance, going to Oakland in these years to sell a motorcycle to the Hell's Angels, who were then living in a house with the Jefferson Airplane, and part of the negotiation, as I recall, had to do with the Angels taking out a baggy of pills, of unknown identity, and passing them around.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1994
Ocean City--This is the way summer officially ends in Ocean City: Not with a whimper, but a bang (apologies to T. S. Eliot). The Beach Boys, Dion and Starship will put on an end-of-summer concert on the beach Saturday, Sept. 3."I think we're at least going to match last year's number," says Ocean City's tourism director, Bob Rothermel. "Last year it drew 10,000 people. We may even draw more than that."Labor Day weekend is a difficult one to predict, he says, because of the changing date each year (the first Monday in September moves around the calendar)
NEWS
February 24, 1994
"Papa" John Creach, 76, a violinist best known for his work with the San Francisco-based rock group Jefferson Airplane, died Tuesday in Los Angeles. He performed with Jefferson Airplane from 1970 to 1972 and with Airplane members in the group Hot Tuna from 1971 to 1973. Jefferson Airplane later became known as Jefferson Starship and eventually Starship. He had toured with Starship since 1992.* Lt. Gen. Johannes Steinhoff, 80, one of the Luftwaffe's fighter aces of World War II and a mover in rebuilding the postwar German military under NATO auspices, died Monday in Bonn, Germany.
NEWS
September 9, 1994
Terence Young, 79, who directed the first, second and fourth of the James Bond movies, died of a heart attack in France Wednesday. Mixing sex, violence, and offbeat humor against expensive sets and exotic locations, his first Bond movie, "Dr. No," was a box office success and proved a winning formula for the films that followed. Starring Sean Connery as the --ing British secret agent 007, it was released in 1962. He also directed "From Russia With Love" and "Thunderball."Catharine L. Wright Menninger, 91, widow of Dr. William C. Menninger and a trustee of the Menninger Foundation, died Tuesday in Topeka, Kan. The world-famous psychiatric institute, founded in 1925, later became the Menninger Clinic, then the Menninger Foundation and now uses just Menninger for its corporate name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | June 18, 1993
"The Real Live Brady Bunch"Where: Kennedy Center, WashingtonWhen: Mondays through Thursdays at 7:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Through July 17Tickets: $19 and $24Call: (800) 444-1324WashingtonI've been "Brady-ed."I confess I missed most episodes of the early 1970s sitcom, "The Brady Bunch." But thanks to the legitimate stage -- specifically the stage of the Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater -- I've made up for some lost time.Theater critics frequently complain that plays are becoming too much like sitcoms.
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