Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJeb Bush
IN THE NEWS

Jeb Bush

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 4, 2014
Inevitably, considering the absence of a clear Republican frontrunner for the 2016 presidential election, the name of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush of the Bush family dynasty has been rushed to the fore. On his record in office and his soft-spoken personal appeal, he would seem a natural to go to the head of a list of only moderately impressive wannabes. But the immediate question is: Do American voters, after a double dose of Bushes, want another one? The fact is that memories of the two George Bush presidencies now set few GOP hearts aflutter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 4, 2014
Inevitably, considering the absence of a clear Republican frontrunner for the 2016 presidential election, the name of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush of the Bush family dynasty has been rushed to the fore. On his record in office and his soft-spoken personal appeal, he would seem a natural to go to the head of a list of only moderately impressive wannabes. But the immediate question is: Do American voters, after a double dose of Bushes, want another one? The fact is that memories of the two George Bush presidencies now set few GOP hearts aflutter.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 11, 2013
Amid the wreckage of the Mitt Romney presidential debacle and the Republican scramble to find a new savior, now comes ... yet another Bush! The ruminations of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, son of one former president and younger brother of another, on maybe seeking the presidency in 2016 raises among other possibilities another campaign clash of the Bush and Clinton dynasties. The talk of Jeb, now touring the talk-show circuit peddling his new book, "Immigration Wars," conjures up a matchmaker's dream of one political heir against another, former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 11, 2013
Amid the wreckage of the Mitt Romney presidential debacle and the Republican scramble to find a new savior, now comes ... yet another Bush! The ruminations of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, son of one former president and younger brother of another, on maybe seeking the presidency in 2016 raises among other possibilities another campaign clash of the Bush and Clinton dynasties. The talk of Jeb, now touring the talk-show circuit peddling his new book, "Immigration Wars," conjures up a matchmaker's dream of one political heir against another, former first lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Malcolm X used to speak of the need to get freedom "by any means necessary." Apparently, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush feels the same about the need to get Michael Schiavo. Mr. Bush directed the state's attorney to open an investigation into whether Mr. Schiavo delayed in calling paramedics when he found his wife, Terri, passed out in their bathroom before sunrise on Feb. 25, 1990. The pretext for this is that over the years, Mr. Schiavo has given conflicting estimates of the time he found his wife.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | February 26, 1994
MIAMI -- Jeb Bush had started the day with a breakfast meeting in Ocala, then flown from Orlando back to Miami for a luncheon talk with some businessmen in Hialeah. Ahead is a fund-raiser that will produce about $10,000 for his campaign for governor of Florida.But Bush cancels two other meetings to watch his 17-year-old son, George, a left-handed hitting first baseman, play a high school baseball game. It proves rewarding.Sitting behind home plate with a half-dozen other parents on a soft afternoon, Bush sees young George at his best -- a line drive right at the right fielder, a long home run over the fence in left-center, then a screaming smash up the alley in right center that would have netted him a double when he is thrown out trying to stretch it.It has been a hell of a day for both the grandson and the son of former President George Bush.
NEWS
September 7, 2001
The following editorial appeared this week in the Miami Herald. AS THEY SAY on Saturday Night Live, it's Reno time. Unfortunately, there might not be many laughs in a drawn-out gubernatorial battle in Florida pitting the former attorney general against Jeb Bush. It might, in fact, get ugly. What it shouldn't be is dull, despite the fact that neither candidate is an electrifying presence. Janet Reno brings to the race a prickly independence, a formidable intellect and a truckload of baggage from the Clinton administration.
NEWS
April 17, 2000
FLORIDA'S LAW abandoning affirmative action in college admissions may not be as monstrous as critics fear, but other states shouldn't rush to emulate it. The so-called One Florida Plan is far from proven. Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, who proposed the measure, says his plan will boost minority enrollment by guaranteeing admission to the top 20 percent of high school seniors. Opponents say gains in minority college enrollment and graduation since the 1960s will shift into reverse. They have good reason for this prediction: State universities will drastically scale back a program to admit capable but disadvantaged students.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2005
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - For most of his time in office, Gov. Jeb Bush has all but walked on water, pushing through changes that a less confident or less pedigreed politician would not have dared. But with less than two years left in power, Bush is experiencing something strange: defeat. His mind was plainly on his legacy in March, when he used his State of the State address to call for "bold, brave ideas" to "define us as dreamers, builders and problem solvers." Among his top goals were expanding a school voucher program that has been found unconstitutional and is under review by the Florida Supreme Court, and scaling back a costly constitutional requirement to reduce class size in public schools.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 30, 2000
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - After avoiding the spotlight for three weeks, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is being thrust inexorably toward a more central role in his brother's struggle for the state. As the Republican-controlled state Legislature moves toward intervention in the dispute, the prospect is growing that the governor soon might sign unprecedented legislation to directly award Florida's 25 electoral votes to his brother, George W. Bush. Yesterday, in his most extensive public comments yet on the controversy, Jeb Bush endorsed the arguments of state Republican legislative leaders who say they have a constitutional right to directly appoint the electors if it appears the legal disputes over the Florida results won't be completed in time to assure that the state participates in the Electoral College.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 16, 2012
Don't you find it odd that the word "extremism" seems to apply only to conservative Republicans? Terminology often drives political discourse, and those who control the terms often determine the outcome. Establishment Republicans have too often been uncomfortable in their own skin. When they win elections, they sometimes seem unsure of what to do next. Democrats never seem to have this problem. They operate according to their core convictions and are never considered extreme. Instead, they are moderate, even normal.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | December 4, 2008
Episcopalians forming rival denomination WHEATON, Ill.: Conservatives alienated from the Episcopal Church said yesterday that they were founding a rival church denomination, the biggest challenge yet to the authority of the Episcopal Church since it ordained an openly gay bishop five years ago. The move threatens the fragile unity of the Anglican Communion, the world's third-largest Christian body, made up of 38 provinces around the world that trace their...
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 5, 2007
People may care as much about the cost of prescription drugs these days as they do about getting a good deal on a car. They're up against the breathtaking drug costs a lot more often. At least they can talk to the car salesmen. Even if we're not good at numbers, we probably get a better deal when we haggle. With cars, it's accepted as the American way. So, what if we could bargain a little on the cholesterol meds? And what if the state came onto the showroom floor (as it were) to strengthen our hand?
NEWS
By MAYA BELL and MAYA BELL,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 2, 2006
MIAMI -- After 47 years, Miami still waits. The horn-honking, flag-waving and impromptu street parties that erupted shortly after Fidel Castro temporarily ceded power to his brother late Monday continued in pockets across Miami-Dade County yesterday, but the jubilation was tempered by uncertainty. "It is a steppingstone, but the question is to what," said Leonardo Valma, 42, a history teacher who fled Cuba when he was a boy. "We all have our theories and speculations, but from the layman on the street to George Bush in the White House, that's all they are, theories and speculation."
NEWS
By ROBERT NOLIN AND JEAN-PAUL RENAUD and ROBERT NOLIN AND JEAN-PAUL RENAUD,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | October 28, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. -- Offering words of encouragement and the promise of "ships coming in" with gas, President Bush toured fuel-thirsty South Florida yesterday, meeting with local officials and a storm-stunned public as the area lurched uncertainly toward recovery. "Soon, more and more houses will have their electricity back on and life will get back to normal," Bush told a crowd of nearly 100 waiting at a lunch distribution center in Pompano Beach. "In the meantime, the federal government, working with the state and local government, is responding as best as we possibly can."
NEWS
By Peter Wallsten and Peter Wallsten,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 21, 2005
WASHINGTON - As the 2000 presidential recount battle raged in Florida, a little-known private attorney named John G. Roberts Jr. traveled to the state capital to dispense legal advice. Roberts operated in the shadows during at least some of those 37 days, never signing a legal brief and rarely making an appearance at the makeshift Tallahassee headquarters for George W. Bush's legal team. But now Roberts has been nominated to the Supreme Court that settled the recount by putting Bush into office - replacing the swing vote in a 5-4 case.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 2000
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -Doreen Haas wants Governor Bush to pay for the election debacle - and not the Governor Bush from Texas. "Goodbye Jeb in 2002," said her sign, in pink and green glitter, referring to the Florida governor and brother of the candidate. "I think Jeb is behind this whole thing," said Haas, of Clearwater, at a Democratic rally at the Capitol this week. "I know Democrats who haven't voted in years who are calling me up to ask, `What can I do?'" If you think Texas Gov. George W. Bush is under pressure, consider the spot in which his younger brother finds himself.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - Florida Gov. Jeb Bush's last-minute intervention in the case of Terri Schiavo, even after President Bush had ended his own effort to keep her alive, may have failed in a legal sense, but it cemented the conservative and religious credentials of a man whose political pedigree is huge and whose political future remains a subject of intense speculation. On one level, the governor's emergence as the most prominent politician still fighting to have a feeding tube reinserted in Schiavo, despite a string of court and legislative defeats, was very much in keeping with a man who has repeatedly declared a deep religious faith.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Malcolm X used to speak of the need to get freedom "by any means necessary." Apparently, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush feels the same about the need to get Michael Schiavo. Mr. Bush directed the state's attorney to open an investigation into whether Mr. Schiavo delayed in calling paramedics when he found his wife, Terri, passed out in their bathroom before sunrise on Feb. 25, 1990. The pretext for this is that over the years, Mr. Schiavo has given conflicting estimates of the time he found his wife.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2005
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. - For most of his time in office, Gov. Jeb Bush has all but walked on water, pushing through changes that a less confident or less pedigreed politician would not have dared. But with less than two years left in power, Bush is experiencing something strange: defeat. His mind was plainly on his legacy in March, when he used his State of the State address to call for "bold, brave ideas" to "define us as dreamers, builders and problem solvers." Among his top goals were expanding a school voucher program that has been found unconstitutional and is under review by the Florida Supreme Court, and scaling back a costly constitutional requirement to reduce class size in public schools.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.