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Jeanne Moreau

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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
Some years back, I found a letter in my mailbox at The Sun addressed to Jeanne Moreau, the iconic French actress of the 1950s and '60s, in Paris - a rather glamorous and mysterious missive, given that the bulk of my correspondence tends to come from PR people or prisoners. But the international intrigue was short-lived. It was just a returned letter, popped by the mail guy into my slot (only in the newsroom is Jean Marbella the closest thing to Jeanne Moreau) rather than into the slot of the person who actually sent the letter.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2012
Some years back, I found a letter in my mailbox at The Sun addressed to Jeanne Moreau, the iconic French actress of the 1950s and '60s, in Paris - a rather glamorous and mysterious missive, given that the bulk of my correspondence tends to come from PR people or prisoners. But the international intrigue was short-lived. It was just a returned letter, popped by the mail guy into my slot (only in the newsroom is Jean Marbella the closest thing to Jeanne Moreau) rather than into the slot of the person who actually sent the letter.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 18, 1992
I kept waiting for the sad clown of life, from the Bud Lite commercials, to appear in "Until the End of the World," which has just opened at the Rotunda. But alas, he doesn't. Why ask why?Unfortunately, his opposite number, the sad clown of lifelessness, was everywhere in evidence. This nasty scalawag spreads his anti-magic dust on all the proceedings, turning the actors into faintly embarrassed mannequins and the story into a fragile construct of tissue-thin coincidence and foolishness. The sad clown of lifelessness, moreover, transmutes the light touch of German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas")
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2006
Elevator to the Gallows [Criterion] $40 After working as a cameraman and co-director for underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau, Louis Malle made his self-assured feature film directorial debut with the gripping 1957 romantic thriller Elevator to the Gallows (Criterion, $40). The French filmmaker was all of 24 when he co-wrote the screenplay and directed this tale about the illicit love affair between a married woman (Jeanne Moreau) and the handsome ex-paratrooper (Maurice Ronet) who works for her much older, wealthy husband.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | May 4, 1994
I HAVE come to Paris to see the chestnuts in bloom. There is a knock on the door. A beautiful Frenchwoman in a Chanel suit and a pillbox hat is standing there. "I wish to take you to Chez Taillevent, one of the greatest restaurants in the world.""But I don't have a reservation," I say."You are an American. You don't need a reservation. We have not forgotten what you did for us in the French Revolution."I put on my jacket and follow her downstairs where her souped-up Peugeot is waiting. Like most French people she doesn't drive too fast or too slow.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1993
"Point of No Return" isn't a remake so much as a tracing of another movie, Luc Besson's original "La Femme Nikita" of just three years ago. So in a certain respect it feels dead; it has glitz, glamour and pizazz but no personality or spontaneity; it feels as if it were directed by a robot. Whatever it represented to Besson, I'll tell you what it represented to John Badham: a paycheck.Still . . . it kind of packs a punch. OK, I watched, I rooted, I enjoyed and, toward the end, I was involutarily pulling the trigger along with our heroine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 4, 2006
Elevator to the Gallows [Criterion] $40 After working as a cameraman and co-director for underwater explorer Jacques Cousteau, Louis Malle made his self-assured feature film directorial debut with the gripping 1957 romantic thriller Elevator to the Gallows (Criterion, $40). The French filmmaker was all of 24 when he co-wrote the screenplay and directed this tale about the illicit love affair between a married woman (Jeanne Moreau) and the handsome ex-paratrooper (Maurice Ronet) who works for her much older, wealthy husband.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 10, 1994
To hear the voice is to know why there'll always be an England. It's not one of those regal things, aristocratic and nasal and refined and beautifully modulated. Actually, voices like that are a dime a dozen.No, what's loose in the great Joan Plowright's tones, under the warm, plummy density of the accent, is a torrent of merriment, a sparkle of spontaneity, a trill of delight; there's a note of conspicuous irony and actual physical pleasure, as if the owner were actively sucking fun from the air even as she spoke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 24, 1993
The producers of "The Summer House" are comparing it to "Enchanted April," the breakout art hit of last year, for the usual mercenary reason: by capitalizing on the magic of "April," perhaps they can goose "Summer" into some kind of vivid commercial life.Who can blame them? That's what producers do. That's why they're producers.But the contrasts are far more telling than the comparisons. Where "Enchanted" was gossamer and romantic, "Summer House" is raunchy and coarse. It's not a dream of love, an encomium about seizing the moment before passion flees, but something a good deal thornier: a dirty joke.
NEWS
January 20, 1994
JEANNE Moreau no doubt has a number of fans in Baltimore, especially after her memorable performance as Aunt Lili in the new movie, "The Summer House." So it's worth noting that, for her part, the French actress is a fan of Baltimore. In a recent interview with the New York Times she spoke of her disdain for Europeans who profess dislike for the United States:"When I hear people in Europe talk about 'the Americans,' I say, 'You don't know a thing about the Americans'," she said. "This is an incredible country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 10, 1994
To hear the voice is to know why there'll always be an England. It's not one of those regal things, aristocratic and nasal and refined and beautifully modulated. Actually, voices like that are a dime a dozen.No, what's loose in the great Joan Plowright's tones, under the warm, plummy density of the accent, is a torrent of merriment, a sparkle of spontaneity, a trill of delight; there's a note of conspicuous irony and actual physical pleasure, as if the owner were actively sucking fun from the air even as she spoke.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | May 4, 1994
I HAVE come to Paris to see the chestnuts in bloom. There is a knock on the door. A beautiful Frenchwoman in a Chanel suit and a pillbox hat is standing there. "I wish to take you to Chez Taillevent, one of the greatest restaurants in the world.""But I don't have a reservation," I say."You are an American. You don't need a reservation. We have not forgotten what you did for us in the French Revolution."I put on my jacket and follow her downstairs where her souped-up Peugeot is waiting. Like most French people she doesn't drive too fast or too slow.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 20, 1993
"Point of No Return" isn't a remake so much as a tracing of another movie, Luc Besson's original "La Femme Nikita" of just three years ago. So in a certain respect it feels dead; it has glitz, glamour and pizazz but no personality or spontaneity; it feels as if it were directed by a robot. Whatever it represented to Besson, I'll tell you what it represented to John Badham: a paycheck.Still . . . it kind of packs a punch. OK, I watched, I rooted, I enjoyed and, toward the end, I was involutarily pulling the trigger along with our heroine.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 18, 1992
I kept waiting for the sad clown of life, from the Bud Lite commercials, to appear in "Until the End of the World," which has just opened at the Rotunda. But alas, he doesn't. Why ask why?Unfortunately, his opposite number, the sad clown of lifelessness, was everywhere in evidence. This nasty scalawag spreads his anti-magic dust on all the proceedings, turning the actors into faintly embarrassed mannequins and the story into a fragile construct of tissue-thin coincidence and foolishness. The sad clown of lifelessness, moreover, transmutes the light touch of German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas")
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1995
A pretty good series returns, other regular series and a TV movie offer some familiar guest stars, and a cable movie screening presents a resolution of the unfinished final work by novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald.* "Christy" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- A protest effort by fans, launched when CBS abruptly pulled "Christy" from the schedule back around Thanksgiving, has brought the show back for a last chance to find more viewers. Kellie Martin stars as a backwoods school teacher, and Tyne Daly is the missionary who hired her. Episodes are scheduled for tonight and next week, in place of "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | September 6, 1991
LA FEMME NIKITAVidmark Entertainment$89.95Some viewers and critics (both French and American) found this slick action thriller to be a sign that French cinema was in dire straits -- that today's filmmakers only cared about imitating the gloss and the technique of Hollywood.Still, "La Femme Nikita" was widely viewed and praised in France and is one of the rare French films of late to make an impact in the States.Director Luc Besson's film is high-tech, streamlined and devoid of much deep meaning but it also contains an exciting performance by Anne Parillaud in the title role.
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