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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 9, 2000
"Les Miserables" bills itself as "The World's Most Popular Musical." And, now that "Cats," the longest running show in Broadway history, is slated to close in June, the "Les Mis" boast may not be overstated. With "Cats" out of the picture, "Les Mis" will be the longest running show that is, well, still running. When the national touring production opens its two-week run here Tuesday, it will be the fifth time Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's 1862 novel has played the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, one of the smallest theaters this large production visits.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
"Les Miserables" made history long ago. The legendary musical won eight Tony Awards in 1987 - including Best Musical and Best Original Score, with music by Claude-Michel Schonberg and English lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer. It's the fourth-longest-running show in Broadway history, with about 6,680 performances in six years. Now this masterpiece is making local theater history at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia, as owner and artistic director Toby Orenstein takes on her most formidable challenge.
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SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG | March 29, 2007
Australia has always been the land of possibility, as well as new beginnings. The country, after all, was originally populated by criminals, most of them convicted of petty crimes (think Jean Valjean) and shipped from England or Ireland between 1788 and 1868 to help prison overcrowding. Such an interesting, complicated, ancestry somehow lay the groundwork for a culture that can be both delicate and beautiful, yet manly and roguish, all at the same time. Only Australia could produce such divergent Oscar winners as Cate Blanchett and Mel Gibson.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | August 15, 2013
The storming of a barricade is the dramatic highlight of the Broadway musical "Les Miserables. " There's likely to be a storming of the box office at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia, whose exciting production qualifies as one of its best shows in recent years. It's an ambitious musical to stage in any theater, so doing it at an in-the-round dinner theater is a bold move. Co-directors Toby Orenstein and Steven Fleming skillfully handle the complicated traffic management. There are 24 actors negotiating a compact performance space that's also occupied by the moving platforms deployed as prison cells, cafes, living quarters and, of course, the barricade erected in an early 19th-century Paris street.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | August 15, 2013
The storming of a barricade is the dramatic highlight of the Broadway musical "Les Miserables. " There's likely to be a storming of the box office at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia, whose exciting production qualifies as one of its best shows in recent years. It's an ambitious musical to stage in any theater, so doing it at an in-the-round dinner theater is a bold move. Co-directors Toby Orenstein and Steven Fleming skillfully handle the complicated traffic management. There are 24 actors negotiating a compact performance space that's also occupied by the moving platforms deployed as prison cells, cafes, living quarters and, of course, the barricade erected in an early 19th-century Paris street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
There's something about "Les Miserables" that keeps me coming back. It's not that "Les Miz," running through Sunday at the Hippodrome Theatre , is my favorite musical. Far from it. It's all too easy to point out the technical flaws in Claude-Michel Schonberg's melodies (bombastic) and Herbert Kretzmer's lyrics (unsurprising). The critics have been making these arguments for the past 27 years, and for the past 27 years, audiences have been ignoring the critics. Producer Cameron Mackintosh's much-hyped new staging incorporates brighter costumes and screen projections to simulate such effects as Paris' underground sewers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 1, 1994
"Les Miserables" has set up its revolutionary barricades, Paris tenements and sewers at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre for the third time, and once again this rousing musical version of Victor Hugo's classic novel has the stuff to bring an audience to its feet for a well-deserved ovation.Except for the mostly impressive cast, the production hasn't changed much. That's good news since Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's almost entirely sung version of Hugo's 1,200-page epic has always been as slickly efficient as it is melodious and moving.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
"Les Miserables" made history long ago. The legendary musical won eight Tony Awards in 1987 - including Best Musical and Best Original Score, with music by Claude-Michel Schonberg and English lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer. It's the fourth-longest-running show in Broadway history, with about 6,680 performances in six years. Now this masterpiece is making local theater history at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia, as owner and artistic director Toby Orenstein takes on her most formidable challenge.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | December 2, 1993
Young ballerinas are dreamers. They dream of dancing the part of Clara in "The Nutcracker." They dream of dancing with an important company at the Kennedy Center. Those dreams are ideals their parents tolerate.Katie Santilli is a ballerina who is living her dreams. At 12, she's an honor student with an A average at Glenwood Middle School. This holiday season, Katie will dance the role of Clara with the Central Maryland School of Ballet. She'll also dance with the Joffrey Ballet at the Kennedy Center in "The Nutcracker," not only as a mouse, but in the important role of Polichenelles.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | December 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As the whole country knows by now, Newt Gingrich has many hang-ups. But the one I like the most is when he blames welfare and the Great Society for all the crime problems in America.Newt faulted the welfare state when Susan Smith drowned her two sons in a car; he also blamed the heinous crime in Illinois -- where an unborn baby was violently cut from his mother's womb -- on a "welfare system which subsidized people for doing nothing."When I read all the blame that Newt was laying on the poor I immediately thought of "Les Miserables" and how the welfare system in Paris had been responsible for the crime of that period.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
There's something about "Les Miserables" that keeps me coming back. It's not that "Les Miz," running through Sunday at the Hippodrome Theatre , is my favorite musical. Far from it. It's all too easy to point out the technical flaws in Claude-Michel Schonberg's melodies (bombastic) and Herbert Kretzmer's lyrics (unsurprising). The critics have been making these arguments for the past 27 years, and for the past 27 years, audiences have been ignoring the critics. Producer Cameron Mackintosh's much-hyped new staging incorporates brighter costumes and screen projections to simulate such effects as Paris' underground sewers.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBERG | March 29, 2007
Australia has always been the land of possibility, as well as new beginnings. The country, after all, was originally populated by criminals, most of them convicted of petty crimes (think Jean Valjean) and shipped from England or Ireland between 1788 and 1868 to help prison overcrowding. Such an interesting, complicated, ancestry somehow lay the groundwork for a culture that can be both delicate and beautiful, yet manly and roguish, all at the same time. Only Australia could produce such divergent Oscar winners as Cate Blanchett and Mel Gibson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 9, 2000
"Les Miserables" bills itself as "The World's Most Popular Musical." And, now that "Cats," the longest running show in Broadway history, is slated to close in June, the "Les Mis" boast may not be overstated. With "Cats" out of the picture, "Les Mis" will be the longest running show that is, well, still running. When the national touring production opens its two-week run here Tuesday, it will be the fifth time Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's 1862 novel has played the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre, one of the smallest theaters this large production visits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 1, 1994
"Les Miserables" has set up its revolutionary barricades, Paris tenements and sewers at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre for the third time, and once again this rousing musical version of Victor Hugo's classic novel has the stuff to bring an audience to its feet for a well-deserved ovation.Except for the mostly impressive cast, the production hasn't changed much. That's good news since Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's almost entirely sung version of Hugo's 1,200-page epic has always been as slickly efficient as it is melodious and moving.
NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | December 2, 1993
Young ballerinas are dreamers. They dream of dancing the part of Clara in "The Nutcracker." They dream of dancing with an important company at the Kennedy Center. Those dreams are ideals their parents tolerate.Katie Santilli is a ballerina who is living her dreams. At 12, she's an honor student with an A average at Glenwood Middle School. This holiday season, Katie will dance the role of Clara with the Central Maryland School of Ballet. She'll also dance with the Joffrey Ballet at the Kennedy Center in "The Nutcracker," not only as a mouse, but in the important role of Polichenelles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 8, 2004
`Les Miserables' at Hippodrome Sixteen years on Broadway (where it closed last year); 18 and counting on London's West End; a worldwide audience of more than 50 million and global receipts topping $1.8 billion. Those are among the statistics accrued by Les Miserables, Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg's musical adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic novel. And here's a new local stat -- after six engagements at the Mechanic Theatre, the Tony Award-winning musical will play its first engagement at the Hippodrome Theatre, beginning Tuesday.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | February 20, 2008
A few years ago, light and sound expert Garrett Hyde reminded me where to look to find thriving theater: local schools. I caught up last weekend with Hyde, who has become aware of a growing number of private schools offering first-rate shows. Rockbridge Academy in Millersville and Severn School in Severna Park are each offering musical favorites this weekend: Rockbridge will present Oliver! at the Chesapeake Arts Center's 900-seat theater, and Severn will present Les Miserables at the school's Water Street Theater.
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