Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJean Stapleton
IN THE NEWS

Jean Stapleton

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 5, 2013
I think Edith Bunker did more to liberate the caged American housewife than Betty Friedan ever did. The author of "The Feminine Mystique" is the one who identified the nameless dissatisfaction of women at home with the kids and the kitchen chores. But it was Archie Bunker's wife, Edith - so memorably portrayed by Jean Stapleton, who died last week at 90 - who brought it home, literally. "All in The Family" was the most popular show on network television for years in the 1970s - back in the days of appointment television, when families gathered together to watch their favorite shows.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 5, 2013
I think Edith Bunker did more to liberate the caged American housewife than Betty Friedan ever did. The author of "The Feminine Mystique" is the one who identified the nameless dissatisfaction of women at home with the kids and the kitchen chores. But it was Archie Bunker's wife, Edith - so memorably portrayed by Jean Stapleton, who died last week at 90 - who brought it home, literally. "All in The Family" was the most popular show on network television for years in the 1970s - back in the days of appointment television, when families gathered together to watch their favorite shows.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 4, 2001
Jean Stapleton as Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor Roosevelt is back in Washington - at least in spirit. Capturing that spirit is Jean Stapleton in Rhoda Lerman's one-woman show, Eleanor: Her Secret Journey , which opens at Arena Stage in Washington tomorrow. Best known as Edith Bunker in the long-running TV series All in the Family, Stapleton first played the famed first lady in a 1982 CBS-TV movie, which was based on a story by Lerman. The stage play is, in turn, based on Lerman's 1979 novel, Eleanor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 4, 2001
Jean Stapleton as Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor Roosevelt is back in Washington - at least in spirit. Capturing that spirit is Jean Stapleton in Rhoda Lerman's one-woman show, Eleanor: Her Secret Journey , which opens at Arena Stage in Washington tomorrow. Best known as Edith Bunker in the long-running TV series All in the Family, Stapleton first played the famed first lady in a 1982 CBS-TV movie, which was based on a story by Lerman. The stage play is, in turn, based on Lerman's 1979 novel, Eleanor.
FEATURES
May 19, 2001
"Like Mother, Like Son: The Strange Story of Sante and Kenny Kimes" has a big name star in the credit and a sensational real-life story as its basis. Don't let that fool you into wasting one of the best nights of television viewing this year on a failed CBS movie. The film stars Mary Tyler Moore as Sante Kimes, a compulsive thief and con artist, who trained her son, Kenny (Gabriel Olds), since childhood to be her accomplice. The pair makes headlines when they murder a wealthy New York woman (Jean Stapleton)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 28, 1991
When "All In the Family" premiered on CBS in 1971, the network felt compelled to offer a cautionary announcement, saying the show, "seeks to throw a humorous spotlight on our frailties, prejudices and concerns . . . to show -- in a mature fashion -- just how absurd they are."Never before had a series dealt so bluntly with racism, sexism, abortion, birth control and other sensitive subjects. Indeed, from the perspective of almost-anything-goes 1991, it is hard to look back and remember just how daring the sitcom really was. And that's why tonight's rebroadcast of the spring special "All in the Family's 20th Anniversary" is worth watching.
FEATURES
By Mark de la Vina and Mark de la Vina,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
While everyone else focuses on what's going to happen to actor David Caruso, the producers of the television show "NYPD Blue" have to figure out what to do with Det. John Kelly.They could get Hong Kong action director John Woo to work the season's fourth episode and have him die in a maelstrom of shrapnel while trying to stop the Zodiac killer.Or, if Steve Bochco and his writers need more inspiration, they could look at how past shows have handled the departure of important cast members:* Shannen Doherty, "Beverly Hills, 90210."
FEATURES
By Michael HIll | February 15, 1991
LAST WEEKEND it was Lucy and Ricky. This weekend, it's Archie Bunker, Ed Sullivan and Mary Richards. No wonder they used to call CBS the Tiffany's of the networks.Unable to generate many destined-to-be-classic shows these days -- "Murphy Brown," maybe "Designing Women," but can you really see "Murder, She Wrote" getting enough votes for the Hall of Fame? -- CBS is dipping into its impressive past in search of viewers.Two are 20th anniversary specials, marking two decades since a pair of CBS' best comedies went on the air. Tomorrow night at 8 o'clock, it's 90 minutes of "All in the Family."
NEWS
By Richard Horrmann and Richard Horrmann,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
"Do you know what it's like to never have had someone turn to you and say, 'I love you'?"Eight months after filming, these words, softly uttered by Aurora Greenway's housekeeper in the new film "The Evening Star," still bring tears to Marion Ross' eyes.As well they should. For not only do they signal a defining moment in this long-awaited sequel to "Terms of Endearment," they also are the words that landed Ross a role in the movie, the biggest part she's ever had in a feature film -- and they're the words that just might land her an Oscar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Cabaret artist Jennifer Blades will reprise her role as Julia Child in Lee Hoiby's 18-minute opera "Bon Appetit" during an evening of dinner and opera at Germano's. In addition, Blades will portray Child in a new piece about Child's friendship with the chef Lidia Bastianich, who will be played by Alessandra Fabiani. Written originally for Jean Stapleton, "Bon Appetit" has been described as "a comic culinary extravaganza. " The performances and menu for the evening were inspired by the 1993 PBS special, "Julia Child: Cooking With Master Chefs," in which Julia Child showcases Bastianich cooking pasta with broccoli rabe and sausage and risotto with porcini mushrooms.
FEATURES
May 19, 2001
"Like Mother, Like Son: The Strange Story of Sante and Kenny Kimes" has a big name star in the credit and a sensational real-life story as its basis. Don't let that fool you into wasting one of the best nights of television viewing this year on a failed CBS movie. The film stars Mary Tyler Moore as Sante Kimes, a compulsive thief and con artist, who trained her son, Kenny (Gabriel Olds), since childhood to be her accomplice. The pair makes headlines when they murder a wealthy New York woman (Jean Stapleton)
NEWS
By Richard Horrmann and Richard Horrmann,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 5, 1997
"Do you know what it's like to never have had someone turn to you and say, 'I love you'?"Eight months after filming, these words, softly uttered by Aurora Greenway's housekeeper in the new film "The Evening Star," still bring tears to Marion Ross' eyes.As well they should. For not only do they signal a defining moment in this long-awaited sequel to "Terms of Endearment," they also are the words that landed Ross a role in the movie, the biggest part she's ever had in a feature film -- and they're the words that just might land her an Oscar.
FEATURES
By Mark de la Vina and Mark de la Vina,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
While everyone else focuses on what's going to happen to actor David Caruso, the producers of the television show "NYPD Blue" have to figure out what to do with Det. John Kelly.They could get Hong Kong action director John Woo to work the season's fourth episode and have him die in a maelstrom of shrapnel while trying to stop the Zodiac killer.Or, if Steve Bochco and his writers need more inspiration, they could look at how past shows have handled the departure of important cast members:* Shannen Doherty, "Beverly Hills, 90210."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | August 28, 1991
When "All In the Family" premiered on CBS in 1971, the network felt compelled to offer a cautionary announcement, saying the show, "seeks to throw a humorous spotlight on our frailties, prejudices and concerns . . . to show -- in a mature fashion -- just how absurd they are."Never before had a series dealt so bluntly with racism, sexism, abortion, birth control and other sensitive subjects. Indeed, from the perspective of almost-anything-goes 1991, it is hard to look back and remember just how daring the sitcom really was. And that's why tonight's rebroadcast of the spring special "All in the Family's 20th Anniversary" is worth watching.
FEATURES
By Michael HIll | February 15, 1991
LAST WEEKEND it was Lucy and Ricky. This weekend, it's Archie Bunker, Ed Sullivan and Mary Richards. No wonder they used to call CBS the Tiffany's of the networks.Unable to generate many destined-to-be-classic shows these days -- "Murphy Brown," maybe "Designing Women," but can you really see "Murder, She Wrote" getting enough votes for the Hall of Fame? -- CBS is dipping into its impressive past in search of viewers.Two are 20th anniversary specials, marking two decades since a pair of CBS' best comedies went on the air. Tomorrow night at 8 o'clock, it's 90 minutes of "All in the Family."
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | June 26, 2007
Everyman Theatre's troupe of six resident actors will be expanding by half. Vincent Lancisi, Everyman's artistic director, has announced that two veterans and a promising up-and-comer have joined the ensemble. They are: Wil Love, Carl Schurr and Dawn Ursula. Being named as a resident actor is something more than a mere vote of confidence. Employment isn't guaranteed from season to season, but directors look for plays to produce that will showcase the talents of particular ensemble members.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 7, 1994
The most ambitious offerings on TV tonight come from other than commercial network television. A&E has a documentary about the first lady, TBS has the first part of a three-part examination of women in recent history, Showtime has the start of a wonderful new children's series by Shelley Duvall -- and PBS has the best show of them all, an enthralling Ross McElwee film that opens the new season of "P.O.V."* "NYPD Blue" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Kelly (David Caruso) faces an ethical dilemma in this repeat, and becomes a bit less noble in the aftermath.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.