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Jean Shepherd

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NEWS
April 16, 2002
Betty Jean Shepherd, an Essex homemaker and gardener, died Thursday of a stroke at Franklin Square Hospital Center. She was 67. Betty Jean Geddings was born in Sumter, S.C., and raised in High Point and Greensboro, N.C., where she graduated from high school. She moved to Baltimore a year after her 1952 marriage to Edward Shepherd, a retired Air Products equipment operator, who survives her. An avid reader, she also enjoyed vegetable and flower gardening. Mrs. Shepherd was a member of Graceland Park Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses and was active in community Bible study.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Reminiscing about favorite holiday shows in and around Annapolis seems a pleasant diversion as the new year begins. Although my celebration with my husband began with the Annapolis Chorale's "Celebration of Christmas" concert and then "The Nutcracker," I'll concentrate on three other events: Standing O's "A Christmas Story," the Annapolis Chorale's "Messiah" at St. Anne's Church and "Stef and Sue's Christmas Show" at the Powerhouse. Standing O's humorous presentation of "A Christmas Story" — a favorite spanning generations that I had somehow entirely missed until now — is based on the Indiana boyhood reminiscences of radio personality Jean Shepherd.
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NEWS
October 17, 1999
Jean Shepherd, 78, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to fellow Midwesterner Mark Twain, died early yesterday. Mr. Shepherd, described by media critic Marshall McLuhan as "the first radio novelist," died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla. Mr. Shepherd spent 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, attracting a large following along the Eastern seaboard.
NEWS
April 16, 2002
Betty Jean Shepherd, an Essex homemaker and gardener, died Thursday of a stroke at Franklin Square Hospital Center. She was 67. Betty Jean Geddings was born in Sumter, S.C., and raised in High Point and Greensboro, N.C., where she graduated from high school. She moved to Baltimore a year after her 1952 marriage to Edward Shepherd, a retired Air Products equipment operator, who survives her. An avid reader, she also enjoyed vegetable and flower gardening. Mrs. Shepherd was a member of Graceland Park Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses and was active in community Bible study.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
Reminiscing about favorite holiday shows in and around Annapolis seems a pleasant diversion as the new year begins. Although my celebration with my husband began with the Annapolis Chorale's "Celebration of Christmas" concert and then "The Nutcracker," I'll concentrate on three other events: Standing O's "A Christmas Story," the Annapolis Chorale's "Messiah" at St. Anne's Church and "Stef and Sue's Christmas Show" at the Powerhouse. Standing O's humorous presentation of "A Christmas Story" — a favorite spanning generations that I had somehow entirely missed until now — is based on the Indiana boyhood reminiscences of radio personality Jean Shepherd.
NEWS
April 7, 2007
ROBERT CLARK, 67 `Christmas Story' director Film director Robert Clark, best known for the beloved holiday classic A Christmas Story, was killed with his son in a car wreck Wednesday in Pacific Palisades, Calif., the filmmaker's assistant and police said. Mr. Clark specialized in horror movies and thrillers early in his career, directing such 1970s films as Children Shouldn't Play with Dead Things. His breakout success came with 1981's sex farce Porky's. In 1983, A Christmas Story marked a career high for Mr. Clark.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | December 10, 1991
The Senator Theater, that venerable icon of 1939-style picture-house beauty, has begun a Christmas Festival to carry through to the day itself.Today, the highly fanciful Danny Kaye musical bio "Hans Christian Andersen" plays with the classic 1952 adaptation of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," starring Alistair Sim, in what is considered the best film version of the story.Opening tomorrow and playing through Dec. 14 will be the Frank Capra chestnut, "It's a Wonderful Life" with James Stewart and Donna Reed.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | February 26, 1993
AKRON, Ohio -- It was the dreaded double-dog dare.That and a temperature of 6 degrees got a 6-year-old Akron boy more than he bargained for.As any fan of the 1983 Jean Shepherd movie "A Christmas Story" knows, the double-dog dare cannot be ignored. The movie is the story of 9-year-old Ralphie's quest for a BB gun during a 1940s Christmas.In one scene, one of Ralphie's classmates is "double-dog dared" to stick his tongue to the flagpole to see if it really will freeze.He does and it does.On Wednesday morning, movie fantasy became embarrassing fact when an Akron boy took up his friends' dare and stuck his tongue to a cast-iron fire hydrant.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1996
A pair of holiday movies dominates tonight's lineup: One's the charming (and hilarious) tale of a kid who only wants one thing for Christmas and a dad who just wants to sit in a chair and stare at his lamp made out of a mannequin's leg. The other has become NBC's annual Christmas gift to the nation."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 7, 1990
JUST WONDERING:* Who was checking NBC anchor Tom Brokaw's copy earlier this week?Inappropriate pun-laden transitions between news stories are an irritating part of many local newscasts, but you rarely hear them on the network level. Yet after reporting on this week's runway collision between two airliners in Detroit, in which eight passengers died, Brokaw introduced the next story: "Continental Airlines collided with bankruptcy today. . ."* Do you believe in coincidence? Consider the facts.
NEWS
October 17, 1999
Jean Shepherd, 78, the prolific radio raconteur whose easy storytelling style earned comparisons to fellow Midwesterner Mark Twain, died early yesterday. Mr. Shepherd, described by media critic Marshall McLuhan as "the first radio novelist," died in a hospital near his home on Sanibel Island, Fla. Mr. Shepherd spent 21 years on 50,000-watt WOR-AM in New York City, attracting a large following along the Eastern seaboard.
NEWS
November 26, 2010
Breathes there a man with soul so dead he hasn't felt better about himself after dropping a donation in a Salvation Army red kettle? Apparently so. Responding in part to shoppers' aversion to being asked for money, Giant Food has cut back the amount of time Salvation Army workers can ring their bells outside some of their area supermarkets. This holiday season, the bell ringers at some Giant stores are limited to four-hour stretches for 12 days in November and December. Last year, the ringers worked about 40 days at stores during those two months.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 26, 2003
As anyone who's followed the Akira Kurosawa series at the Charles should know by now, this master Japanese filmmaker has too long been pegged as an artist of action and maker of epics. The final entry in the series - a restoration of Kurosawa's 1952 masterpiece Ikiru, known in English as To Live - should clinch the revival of his original reputation, not merely as a movie master but also as a virtuoso humanist. Here he uses multiple film and narrative techniques to dramatize, without tears, the plight of a dying city-government bureaucrat who looks for shreds of meaning in his family and profession.
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