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October 1, 1994
Forces loyal to Haiti's army rulers disrupt a peaceful pro-democracy march of 5,000 people in Port-au-Prince. Three people are killed and at least 11 injured.Exiled Haiti President Jean-Bertrand Aristide appeals to his countrymen to halt the violence and not send the world "the sad image" of fighting in the streets.U.S. troops seize the national television and radio stations, which had been broadcasting anti-American items. Officials said the action was taken at the request of the Aristide government.
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By Lawrence Pezzullo and Lawrence Pezzullo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 22, 2004
HAITI AGAIN has forced itself on a world community that is trying its best to look away. The Bush administration, embroiled in Iraq, is doing just that. But if history is any guide, it won't hold. Public outrage over the spreading chaos in Haiti and the likelihood that a flood of boat people is not far behind will force the hand of reluctant decision-makers. Entreaties to the Haitians to resolve their differences peacefully and by themselves ignore reality. The crisis besetting Haiti is deep-seated, the end game of a decade-long failure by the regime of Jean-Bertrand Aristide to reconcile differences with other political and social forces.
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NEWS
December 4, 2000
WITHOUT doubt, Jean-Bertrand Aristide won election as president of Haiti on Sunday. No matter that few people voted, that the opposition boycotted or that international observers boycotted, too, because of deep flaws in the legislative voting in May. Former President Aristide scrupulously observed the constitution in not taking a second term in 1995, sitting one out with his protege, Rene Preval, as president. It is still unclear whether he is a democrat or uses his Lavalas Party to intimidate the nation in the manner of past dictators.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 13, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Militant supporters of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide blocked a demonstration planned by civic opposition groups in the capital yesterday, raising barricades of flaming tires and throwing rocks at anyone who tried to breach their blockade. Militants loyal to Aristide and his Lavalas party started gathering in the square late Wednesday night, and hundreds of them threw rocks, taunted and shouted at opposition protesters yesterday morning. "With everything I have got I will fight them," said Willy Dumeria, 30, an Aristide loyalist who spent the night in the square where the opposition protesters were to gather.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- He is not the man whom officials in Washington had hoped to see succeed Jean-Bertrand Aristide.But everything seems to indicate Haitians will elect Rene Preval as their new president in voting today -- which automatically means the United States now has a considerable investment in his future success.The balloting comes after two months of friction in relations between the Clinton administration and Mr. Aristide.After the year-long honeymoon that followed Mr. Aristide's restoration to power in October 1994, the two countries have recently had very public disagreements about such issues as privatizing state companies and returning more than 160,000 pages of documents seized by U.S. troops from the headquarters of the military and paramilitary groups here.
NEWS
June 27, 1995
The election in Haiti Sunday was a triumph for democracy -- in that it was held at all, and was carried off without significant violence.But it was also a grievous setback for democracy -- in that voting never opened in seven of the 133 jurisdictions, with reports rife of missing ballots, closure of precincts and voter confusion. Fortunately, some precincts opened again yesterday, and the July 23 run-off can rectify remaining problems.This was Haiti's second free election, its first since Jean-Bertrand Aristide won the presidency in December 1990.
NEWS
By Newsday | November 28, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- In a move that would greatly complicate already difficult efforts to return President Jean-Bertrand Aristide Haiti, the exiled leader's prime minister is saying he will resign Dec. 15.Robert Malval has been Father Aristide's point man in negotiations with Haitian army officials who overthrew the democratically elected president in a coup Sept. 30, 1991."In the course of his meetings with various groups over the past week, he's been telling them that he intends to resign on the 15th," a knowledgeable U.N. official involved in attempts to resolve Haiti's crisis said of Mr. Malval late Friday.
NEWS
November 24, 2000
The Miami Herald said in an editorial Monday: HAITI'S TROUBLED elections threaten its future. Jean-Bertrand Aristide is again poised to win Haiti's coming presidential election. Few would question his popularity, especially among the poor. But he would do well to measure his wishes. Political victory may give Mr. Aristide a sweet and sweeping return to power, but it could as easily cost him and Haiti dearly. His quest to rule is understandable. A democratically and overwhelmingly elected president in 1990, he was robbed of much of his presidency by a murderous military junta.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- For years, they were so close that people here routinely referred to them as twin brothers. But now that Rene Preval has succeeded Jean-Bertrand Aristide as president, a sudden case of sibling rivalry appears to be eroding their relationship and threatening the unity of their party.Three months after Preval was sworn in, the Lavalas movement, under whose banner both men were elected, is splintering, with the dominant group supporting Preval but others sticking by Aristide.
NEWS
By Ron Daniels | July 7, 1995
DESPITE THE criticism of some members of Congress and the media, President Jean Bertrand Aristide has rightly called the recent election there a "major step forward toward democracy in country."There is little question that the election was troubled by massive logistical problems and some irregularities. However, there is no credible evidence of a systematic effort to aid one political party over another. Republican carping reflects an anti-Aristide bias that runs through U.S. policy toward Haiti.
NEWS
December 4, 2000
WITHOUT doubt, Jean-Bertrand Aristide won election as president of Haiti on Sunday. No matter that few people voted, that the opposition boycotted or that international observers boycotted, too, because of deep flaws in the legislative voting in May. Former President Aristide scrupulously observed the constitution in not taking a second term in 1995, sitting one out with his protege, Rene Preval, as president. It is still unclear whether he is a democrat or uses his Lavalas Party to intimidate the nation in the manner of past dictators.
NEWS
November 24, 2000
The Miami Herald said in an editorial Monday: HAITI'S TROUBLED elections threaten its future. Jean-Bertrand Aristide is again poised to win Haiti's coming presidential election. Few would question his popularity, especially among the poor. But he would do well to measure his wishes. Political victory may give Mr. Aristide a sweet and sweeping return to power, but it could as easily cost him and Haiti dearly. His quest to rule is understandable. A democratically and overwhelmingly elected president in 1990, he was robbed of much of his presidency by a murderous military junta.
NEWS
By E. A. Torriero and Michele Salcedo and E. A. Torriero and Michele Salcedo,SUN-SENTINEL | January 23, 1999
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- The government is broke. Parliament is paralyzed. The president is politically crippled. And the country has been without an official prime minister for more than 18 months.So where is an ordinary Haitian to turn when the hamstrung bureaucracy can't help?Try knocking on Jean-Bertrand Aristide's door. That's where thousands of poor Haitians are finding help.The former priest and president -- who likely will run again next year -- operates an all-purpose foundation that in effect substitutes for at least four key ministries of government.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 12, 1996
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- For years, they were so close that people here routinely referred to them as twin brothers. But now that Rene Preval has succeeded Jean-Bertrand Aristide as president, a sudden case of sibling rivalry appears to be eroding their relationship and threatening the unity of their party.Three months after Preval was sworn in, the Lavalas movement, under whose banner both men were elected, is splintering, with the dominant group supporting Preval but others sticking by Aristide.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- He is not the man whom officials in Washington had hoped to see succeed Jean-Bertrand Aristide.But everything seems to indicate Haitians will elect Rene Preval as their new president in voting today -- which automatically means the United States now has a considerable investment in his future success.The balloting comes after two months of friction in relations between the Clinton administration and Mr. Aristide.After the year-long honeymoon that followed Mr. Aristide's restoration to power in October 1994, the two countries have recently had very public disagreements about such issues as privatizing state companies and returning more than 160,000 pages of documents seized by U.S. troops from the headquarters of the military and paramilitary groups here.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Despite its significance, tomorrow's Haitian presidential election has generated little enthusiasm, which observers attribute in part to the fact that Jean-Bertrand Aristide is not on the ballot.The immensely popular Mr. Aristide, a one-time populist priest, is barred by Haiti's constitution from succeeding himself.Some of Haiti's 3.7 million registered voters "resent having to replace Aristide," said a U.S. official. "If there is a low turnout, it's largely a protest to Aristide leaving."
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 1995
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Despite its significance, tomorrow's Haitian presidential election has generated little enthusiasm, which observers attribute in part to the fact that Jean-Bertrand Aristide is not on the ballot.The immensely popular Mr. Aristide, a one-time populist priest, is barred by Haiti's constitution from succeeding himself.Some of Haiti's 3.7 million registered voters "resent having to replace Aristide," said a U.S. official. "If there is a low turnout, it's largely a protest to Aristide leaving."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 13, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Militant supporters of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide blocked a demonstration planned by civic opposition groups in the capital yesterday, raising barricades of flaming tires and throwing rocks at anyone who tried to breach their blockade. Militants loyal to Aristide and his Lavalas party started gathering in the square late Wednesday night, and hundreds of them threw rocks, taunted and shouted at opposition protesters yesterday morning. "With everything I have got I will fight them," said Willy Dumeria, 30, an Aristide loyalist who spent the night in the square where the opposition protesters were to gather.
NEWS
By Ron Daniels | July 7, 1995
DESPITE THE criticism of some members of Congress and the media, President Jean Bertrand Aristide has rightly called the recent election there a "major step forward toward democracy in country."There is little question that the election was troubled by massive logistical problems and some irregularities. However, there is no credible evidence of a systematic effort to aid one political party over another. Republican carping reflects an anti-Aristide bias that runs through U.S. policy toward Haiti.
NEWS
June 27, 1995
The election in Haiti Sunday was a triumph for democracy -- in that it was held at all, and was carried off without significant violence.But it was also a grievous setback for democracy -- in that voting never opened in seven of the 133 jurisdictions, with reports rife of missing ballots, closure of precincts and voter confusion. Fortunately, some precincts opened again yesterday, and the July 23 run-off can rectify remaining problems.This was Haiti's second free election, its first since Jean-Bertrand Aristide won the presidency in December 1990.
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