Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJealousy
IN THE NEWS

Jealousy

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | May 7, 2007
Operatic melodrama doesn't come any juicier than in Puccini's Tosca. The plot-fueling bursts of jealousy, lust and hatred in this work can pretty much take all the emotion you can dish out, and there's no shortage in the Baltimore Opera Company's season-ending production. Add in some fiery singing, and you've got a torrid little Tosca. Saturday's opening night at the Lyric Opera House did not quite hit the ideal trifecta of any Tosca - three closely matched artists, with the soprano in the title role coming in first by a note - but it didn't matter that much.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Horsey | October 28, 2013
President Obama has been busy this week taking calls from European leaders who seem really upset that the United States has been spying on them, perhaps to the point of tapping their cellphones. First Obama heard from French President Francois Hollande. Mr. Hollande complained that documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the ex-NSA contractor who is now holed up in Moscow, showed that American intelligence agencies had gathered more than 70 million pieces of data from phone communications in France in just one 30-day period.
Advertisement
NEWS
By T. BERRY BRAZELTON, M.D. and T. BERRY BRAZELTON, M.D.,NEW YORK TIMES SPECIAL FEATURES | September 23, 2001
Mother's jealousy will end outings with creative, loving grandmother Q. I'm in the middle of a circumstance with my daughter-in-law and my grandson, who is 15 months old. I care for him two or three days a week. I am a retired preschool teacher and am having a ball introducing to him to concepts he eagerly absorbs. Our state offers many wonderful children's activities, which we enjoy visiting. My daughter-in-law is a wonderful mother. However, through my son, she makes comments about how hurt she is that she can't do these things with her child.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Mount de Sales sophomore golfer Cassie George hit her first-ever hole-in-one on Sunday, and she was the last of her foursome to know it. Her playing partner that day for the recreational round at Bay Hills Golf Club in Arnold, senior Sydney Jupitz, saw the ball roll in and reacted with a scream. The other two in the group, two Bay Hills employees, heard the ball fall in the cup and "freaked out," as George described it. But George looked away after seeing the ball land. “It was a nice shot, it felt really good, but I was just happy it went over [the water hazard]
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 2, 2005
If Kleenex had existed, the tragedy might not have happened. The tragedy is Shakespeare's "Othello," and the plot turns on a handkerchief. The title character gives an heirloom hanky to his bride, Desdemona. She loses this gift. It falls into the wrong hands. Othello becomes convinced his wife is unfaithful, and his jealousy spirals out of control. Few objects in the Shakespearean canon play as prominent a role as this silk square, "spotted with strawberries" and with "magic in the web of it," according to the script, which mentions the word "handkerchief" almost 30 times.
NEWS
February 28, 1995
ANOTHER view, from the editorial page (Feb. 22) of the Wilmington News Journal:"In her moment of triumph, Myrlie Evers-Williams, the new chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, blew a kiss to a packed ballroom in a New York hotel over the weekend, and it roared its approval."That act probably means far more than the brusque, 'It's time to clean house. Where's my broom?' sound-bite most of us have seen repeatedly on TV."Dr. William F. Gibson, the South Carolina dentist who had been chairman for a decade, represented a class schism that has existed on the board for years.
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
Mount de Sales sophomore golfer Cassie George hit her first-ever hole-in-one on Sunday, and she was the last of her foursome to know it. Her playing partner that day for the recreational round at Bay Hills Golf Club in Arnold, senior Sydney Jupitz, saw the ball roll in and reacted with a scream. The other two in the group, two Bay Hills employees, heard the ball fall in the cup and "freaked out," as George described it. But George looked away after seeing the ball land. “It was a nice shot, it felt really good, but I was just happy it went over [the water hazard]
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | December 1, 2007
You're strolling down the street, hand in hand with your significant other, when a tasty treat walks past. What does your sweetie do? Does he put on blinders, keeping his eyes on the sidewalk? Or does he dare look? According to a recent informal poll by Men's Health magazine, it depends: 53 percent of men will look; 28 percent said they will only look in extraordinary circumstances, or if they have sufficient cover (sunglasses anyone?); and 19 percent said they will keep their eyes to themselves.
SPORTS
By GREG COTE and GREG COTE,THE MIAMI HERALD | October 17, 2006
MIAMI --The biggest shock about that melee at the Orange Bowl on Saturday night was that it took until the middle of the third quarter to get going. I would have thought the over/under might have been the pre-game coin flip, and even that was assuming mutual restraint. Maybe we should be thankful the team buses didn't start racing en route to the stadium, trading paint and road-raging through traffic in a hail of bullets. All of the elements were there for an evening of good old-fashioned footbrawl as the University of Miami's Hurricanes and Florida International's Golden Panthers met for the first time.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | August 21, 1998
Longtime readers know that NBC's Ahmad Rashad is not usually held up in this space as a sentinel of journalistic integrity.In fact, Rashad usually takes a pretty good beating in this space for a variety of sins, the most prominent of which is that he is a shameless shill, particularly when the product to be sold is Michael Jordan.But, in the interest of fairness, today is the day when Rashad's best television qualities will be praised to the utmost.Um, er, well (shuffle, shuffle).We're still thinking.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | December 18, 2009
After deliberating for 20 minutes, a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury found a Woodlawn man guilty of first-degree murder Thursday for a stabbing that prosecutors said he committed in a fit of jealousy. Terrell Caldwell, 39, is to be sentenced Feb. 24 for killing Leonard Collier, 26, whom he viewed as a competitor for the attentions of a woman they both knew, prosecutors said during the three-day trial. The confrontation occurred in the early hours of June 12 outside the Woodlawn apartment of 32-year-old Mickele Gales, with whom Caldwell had been romantically involved in 2008.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2009
In what is being billed as the most ambitious programming by the Annapolis Opera, Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci will be presented in a double bill at Maryland Hall for two shows next weekend. "Two complete operas on one bill is a huge challenge with two sets, two casts of outstanding professional singers and two of just about everything else, including costumes, wigs and props," opera President Gregory Stiverson said. "With other opera companies cutting back or ceasing programming altogether, Annapolis Opera is proud to be able to provide even more great live opera for our audiences."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 16, 2008
It isn't love that makes the world go 'round, but jealousy. That's one conclusion to be drawn from the Shakespeare Theatre's production of The Way of the World. The characters drift around the stage in coats and dresses in various shades of emerald and hunter and lime. Costume designer Jane Greenwood wanted to reflect the characters' obsession with money; indeed, every man and woman on stage resembles a dollar bill with legs and a wig. But the color palette also mirrors the characters' moods.
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | December 1, 2007
You're strolling down the street, hand in hand with your significant other, when a tasty treat walks past. What does your sweetie do? Does he put on blinders, keeping his eyes on the sidewalk? Or does he dare look? According to a recent informal poll by Men's Health magazine, it depends: 53 percent of men will look; 28 percent said they will only look in extraordinary circumstances, or if they have sufficient cover (sunglasses anyone?); and 19 percent said they will keep their eyes to themselves.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | May 7, 2007
Operatic melodrama doesn't come any juicier than in Puccini's Tosca. The plot-fueling bursts of jealousy, lust and hatred in this work can pretty much take all the emotion you can dish out, and there's no shortage in the Baltimore Opera Company's season-ending production. Add in some fiery singing, and you've got a torrid little Tosca. Saturday's opening night at the Lyric Opera House did not quite hit the ideal trifecta of any Tosca - three closely matched artists, with the soprano in the title role coming in first by a note - but it didn't matter that much.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 25, 2007
Mendelssohn, Schumann, Mahler -- these composers are so famous they usually go by last names alone. Now consider this roster: Fanny Mendelssohn, Clara Schumann, Alma Mahler. How many people instantly recognize them as composers, too? To narrow the topic even more, how many people have heard their music often enough to think of it as familiar? Welcome to the history of female composers. It's a history well worth exploring, especially as we're in the midst of National Women's History Month -- complete with some complementary concert scheduling.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 8, 2003
The Baltimore Shakespeare Festival has inaugurated its new home, a church, with a play that besmirches much that is holy. This contrast between setting and subject matter sharply heightens the conflict between goodness and evil, innocence and corruption, that is at the core of one of Shakespeare's greatest tragedies, Othello. Besides introducing its permanent home in Hampden, the production also marks another significant turning point for the company - its first major contract with Actors' Equity, the professional actors' union, since the festival nearly foundered in 1998.
NEWS
July 23, 2004
SO, NOW WE KNOW that there were 10 different occasions, over several years, when the U.S. government might have been able to thwart the Sept. 11, 2001, plot -- the last, horrifyingly, on the morning of the event, when hijackers were pulled aside for extra screening but then sent on their way. The security system in place at the time, as described by the report of the 9/11 commission that was released yesterday, almost worked. That's tantalizing and heartbreaking and not good enough. Elements of the sort of structure that's needed are in place, but it's not all there yet. That's what has led the commission to recommend a National Counterterrorism Center, staffed by people from various agencies, and an overall national intelligence director who would oversee all U.S. intelligence-gathering organizations.
SPORTS
By GREG COTE and GREG COTE,THE MIAMI HERALD | October 17, 2006
MIAMI --The biggest shock about that melee at the Orange Bowl on Saturday night was that it took until the middle of the third quarter to get going. I would have thought the over/under might have been the pre-game coin flip, and even that was assuming mutual restraint. Maybe we should be thankful the team buses didn't start racing en route to the stadium, trading paint and road-raging through traffic in a hail of bullets. All of the elements were there for an evening of good old-fashioned footbrawl as the University of Miami's Hurricanes and Florida International's Golden Panthers met for the first time.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 2, 2005
If Kleenex had existed, the tragedy might not have happened. The tragedy is Shakespeare's "Othello," and the plot turns on a handkerchief. The title character gives an heirloom hanky to his bride, Desdemona. She loses this gift. It falls into the wrong hands. Othello becomes convinced his wife is unfaithful, and his jealousy spirals out of control. Few objects in the Shakespearean canon play as prominent a role as this silk square, "spotted with strawberries" and with "magic in the web of it," according to the script, which mentions the word "handkerchief" almost 30 times.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.