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Jazz Singer

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NEWS
November 8, 1993
LONDON -- American-born jazz singer Adelaide Hall, who shared the stage with Duke Ellington and other jazz stars, died in London yesterday at the age of 92, a hospital spokesman said.Born in New York, she was the daughter of a music professor and first performed on stage at 14. Her credits include appearing in the London stage premiere of "Kiss me Kate" as well as Ellington's "Chocolate Kiddies" with Josephine Baker.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Every performance by jazz singer Rene Marie is an act of validation. Sixteen years ago, she faced an ultimatum from her then-husband - abandon music or get out. She chose the latter course, and went on to enjoy an international career. Her musical journey continues as Marie brings her Eartha Kitt tribute to Creative Alliance this weekend. Given her self-confidence and dynamic personality, Marie is a natural to delve into the legacy of the sexy, indelible Kitt. Although Marie can purr seductively through a song, she doesn't try to imitate Kitt.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 5, 1994
It seemed almost too good to be true. Suede, a Baltimore-based jazz singer, had just performed at the National Organization of Women's March on Washington last April, and no sooner had she left the stage than the event's media liaison told her Rolling Stone wanted an interview."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Sometimes, girlfriends just wanna listen to jazz. First lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Sharon Malone, wife of Attorney General Eric Holder, caught Sunday night's first show of contemporary jazz singer Rachelle Ferrell at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis. The women - Malone has been to the Rams Head several times before - were joined by two other women and shared a bottle of white wine while listening to the performance. Zach Price, general manager for Rams Head On Stage, said he was rushing around, making his usual pre-show preparations, when he was told someone wanted to consult him about security for a VIP guest.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 28, 1993
Everybody knows that Billie Holiday was a great jazz singer, perhaps the greatest ever. It hardly matters whether you've heard any of her recordings; Holiday's greatness is a cultural truism, as indisputable as the might of a Beethoven symphony or the beauty of the Mona Lisa.Why, though? How did she achieve such stature in our culture? What was it about her singing that makes her special, keeps her revered?These aren't just idle questions, either. Although most of us would agree that exposure to "great music" is a good thing, our culture's tendency to canonize great musicians often leads us to overlook why we pay such homage.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 14, 2007
Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You ain't heard nothin' yet." Before it was a cliche, it was a prophecy: Eighty years ago this month, audiences watched - and listened - as a character in a major motion picture spoke to them for the first time. The actor was Al Jolson, and the movie was The Jazz Singer. The effect was revolutionary. Within two years, talking pictures were everywhere, no one was releasing silent films, and three decades of silent-filmmaking was obsolete - tossed on the scrap heap.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Sometimes, girlfriends just wanna listen to jazz. First lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Sharon Malone, wife of Attorney General Eric Holder, caught Sunday night's first show of contemporary jazz singer Rachelle Ferrell at Rams Head On Stage in Annapolis. The women - Malone has been to the Rams Head several times before - were joined by two other women and shared a bottle of white wine while listening to the performance. Zach Price, general manager for Rams Head On Stage, said he was rushing around, making his usual pre-show preparations, when he was told someone wanted to consult him about security for a VIP guest.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
The Jazz Singer was the movie that sold the public on talking pictures in 1927 -- the one in which Al Jolson sang "My Mammy." But there's no trace of Jolson in the version playing at Toby's Dinner Theatre. Adaptor Michael Tilford went back to the play on which the movie was based, reworked it for today's audiences and added a batch of great period songs and some original numbers. The result is a lively new musical. The Jazz Singer is set in the early decades of the 20th century, when great tides of European immigrants were arriving in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | July 13, 2006
Maze, featuring Frankie Beverly Maze, featuring Frankie Beverly, brings its laid-back soul sounds to Pier Six on Saturday. The combination of Beverly's smooth voice and Maze's bass-heavy music will undoubtedly make this a show to remember. R&B and jazz singer Will Downing opens the show. Pier Six is at 731 Eastern Ave. Gates open at 6:30 p.m., and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $28-$70. Call 410-547-7328 or visit ticketmaster.com.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 23, 2008
Nobody on TV does biography like PBS' American Masters - and that goes for the life history of institutions as well as individuals. Tonight, the series looks at one of Hollywood's founding motion picture studios in You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story. This three-night exploration of the film kingdom of Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack L. Warner is directed by historian Richard Schickel, and it is not to be missed. Beyond telling backstage stories about memorable films ranging from The Jazz Singer (1927)
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 17, 2009
When Baltimore sculptor James Earl Reid created the city's first memorial to the stunningly gifted jazz singer Billie Holiday in 1985, something was missing. Gone were the panels containing references to the Jim Crow era and the lynching that Holiday so chillingly recounted in the ballad "Strange Fruit." Now Reid has a chance to remedy what he calls censorship by city officials, by adding the bronze panels for today's rededication of the statue on the 50th anniversary of her death. The striking, 8-foot-6-inch-high, 1,200-pound likeness of the Baltimore-born Holiday, wearing a strapless gown, with her trademark gardenias in her hair and her mouth open in song, will now rest on a 20,000-pound base of solid granite, as Reid had intended all along.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | September 23, 2008
Nobody on TV does biography like PBS' American Masters - and that goes for the life history of institutions as well as individuals. Tonight, the series looks at one of Hollywood's founding motion picture studios in You Must Remember This: The Warner Bros. Story. This three-night exploration of the film kingdom of Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack L. Warner is directed by historian Richard Schickel, and it is not to be missed. Beyond telling backstage stories about memorable films ranging from The Jazz Singer (1927)
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2007
Vocalist Ruby Glover, a vibrant link to Baltimore's rich jazz heritage, died Saturday, a day after collapsing onstage during a performance at the Creative Alliance in East Baltimore. On Friday night, Ms. Glover was thrilled to see a full house gathered for a House of Ruth benefit where she was among the performers. With her silver cropped hair, Ms. Glover, 77, appeared as radiant and polished as ever on stage, recalled friend Megan Hamilton. Emcee Stan Stovall from WBAL-TV introduced Ms.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | October 14, 2007
Wait a minute. Wait a minute. You ain't heard nothin' yet." Before it was a cliche, it was a prophecy: Eighty years ago this month, audiences watched - and listened - as a character in a major motion picture spoke to them for the first time. The actor was Al Jolson, and the movie was The Jazz Singer. The effect was revolutionary. Within two years, talking pictures were everywhere, no one was releasing silent films, and three decades of silent-filmmaking was obsolete - tossed on the scrap heap.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | August 9, 2007
Jonathan Butler doesn't think of it as new musical direction. The jazzy pop-soul singer-musician, perhaps best known for his late '80s/early '90s R&B hits such as "Lies" and "Sarah, Sarah," is now adding his laid-back, George Benson-influenced flair to gospel. He doesn't necessarily see Brand New Day, his latest album, as a break from the impassioned secular work he has done for the past 30 years. "I think it's something that's been a long time coming," says Butler, who plays Pier Six Concert Pavilion tonight with smooth-jazz saxophonist Boney James as part of the PAETEC Jazz Festival.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | September 3, 2006
Talk about your warm fuzzies. The banquet room at HarborView Marina was just full of them. Some 200 people had gathered for the annual Easter Seals Captain's Party and Benefit Auction. All those warm feelings had to do with what they were doing the next day, volunteering their time and about 60 boats to take about 400 children with disabilities and their families out for a day on the bay. "I love those kids," said Antwerpen Automotive Group president Jack Antwerpen, who was looking forward to being host for a group aboard his 126-foot yacht for his fourth straight year.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 10, 1993
Sixty-five years ago today, people lined up outside the Metropolitan Theatre at North and Pennsylvania avenues.The attraction was Al Jolson's legendary performance in the movie, "The Jazz Singer," the country's first talkie.The Met, as it was known familiarly, was the first film house in Baltimore that obtained rights to show the new sensation that featured Jolson's voice heard over the patented Vitaphone sound system.During the life of the Met, its plaster walls resounded with applause, laughter and sobs.
NEWS
November 12, 1993
Adelaide HallJazz singerLONDON -- Adelaide Hall, a jazz singer who made her name at the Cotton Club in New York and performed with Duke Ellington, died of pneumonia Sunday at London's Charing Cross Hospital.The 92-year-old American-born singer often performed at the Cotton Club in the 1920s and '30s. She was featured in Ellington's hit, "Creole Love Song."Born in New York, the daughter of a music professor, Ms. Hall began performing on stage when she was 14. After being spotted by a talent scout, she performed in "Chocolate Kiddies," Mr. Ellington's first complete show score.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO | July 13, 2006
Maze, featuring Frankie Beverly Maze, featuring Frankie Beverly, brings its laid-back soul sounds to Pier Six on Saturday. The combination of Beverly's smooth voice and Maze's bass-heavy music will undoubtedly make this a show to remember. R&B and jazz singer Will Downing opens the show. Pier Six is at 731 Eastern Ave. Gates open at 6:30 p.m., and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $28-$70. Call 410-547-7328 or visit ticketmaster.com.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
The Jazz Singer was the movie that sold the public on talking pictures in 1927 -- the one in which Al Jolson sang "My Mammy." But there's no trace of Jolson in the version playing at Toby's Dinner Theatre. Adaptor Michael Tilford went back to the play on which the movie was based, reworked it for today's audiences and added a batch of great period songs and some original numbers. The result is a lively new musical. The Jazz Singer is set in the early decades of the 20th century, when great tides of European immigrants were arriving in the United States.
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