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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
Wilfred "Mickey" Fields, a famed jazz musician who played mostly in Baltimore nightclubs for more than four decades, died of kidney disease Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mr. Fields, 62, played his last gig in October at Heritage Gardens in Parkville, retiring because of failing health. Fellow musicians marveled that he could play at all in later years."His hands were so severely swollen that he had to wrap them around the horn to play; it was incredible that he was able to keep on playing as long as he did," said fellow saxophonist Carlos Johnson, who played with him for 25 years.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 27, 2011
Louis W. "Fuzzy" Kane, an educator whose popular Fuzzy Kane Trio entertained Baltimoreans for more than 40 years with its easygoing jazz in the Les McCann-Ramsey Lewis idiom, died May 21 of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. Mr. Kane, who lived in Strathmore Towers in Northwest Baltimore, was 79. The son of a chauffeur and a cafeteria worker, Mr. Kane was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville, where he graduated in 1948 from Benjamin Banneker High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1953 from what is now Morgan State University and a master's degree in administration in 1962 from Loyola College.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
Hank Levy, a jazz musician hailed as a brilliant composer and orchestrator, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville, where he had lived the past four years. He was 73. The retired director of jazz studies at Towson University's music department, where he taught for 21 years, Mr. Levy wrote jazz compositions and band arrangements, conducted and recorded extensively. "He was extraordinarily talented. He turned jazz music right around when he started working with time changes," said Audrey Kenton, wife of the late band leader Stan Kenton.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
On Tuesday, October 14, LOU PERTESSES, Jazz Musician, beloved father and grandfather. Make it nice, Play it Clean, Jazz Man. Services were private.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
Henry N. Baker Sr., a longtime jazz musician and the owner of a chain of beauty salons that changed the African-American hair care business in Baltimore, died April 7 at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87. Born in New York City, he was the youngest of four children and the only son of a Georgia-born businessman and a homemaker. When he was still young, the family moved to Washington, where his father was shot and killed, plunging the family into poverty.
NEWS
By Melinda Rice and Melinda Rice,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 1998
LeRoy A. Battle stays busy in February.His appointment calendar for the month is a riot of underlining, red exclamation points and reminders. Some notations represent what you would expect for a 76-year-old: family occasions, visits with friends, medical appointments.The rest are a jumble of speeches, public appearances, music gigs and interviews with reporters from newspapers and radio stations -- signs that it must be Black History Month.February is always like this for Roy Battle, a resident of Harwood in southern Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
On Tuesday, October 14, LOU PERTESSES, Jazz Musician, beloved father and grandfather. Make it nice, Play it Clean, Jazz Man. Services were private.
NEWS
By THE ST. PETERSBURG (FLA.) TIMES | April 28, 2006
You cannot make something in the arts exciting for somebody who is raised looking at videos of the most well-buffed people in the world with their a-- hanging out."- WYNTON MARSALIS, jazz musician, on young people and the arts
NEWS
December 10, 1999
Kenny Baker, 78, a jazz musician who performed for sellout British audiences in the 1950s, died Tuesday in a hospital in Felpham in southern England, his manager Jim Simpson said. He had been hospitalized for three weeks with a viral infection.He is best known for his work with the jazz band Baker's Dozen and for his numerous performances on film and television soundtracks. A session musician, he performed with many stars, including Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr. and Tony Bennett. His work can also be heard on James Bond movie soundtracks.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1991
DON'T CALL Carl Filipiak a rocker who plays jazz. And don't call him a jazz musician who plays rock."Really," he said, "I'd like to be known as a musician who plays guitar. I'm still trying to deal with naming this music. After a while, it gets down to, 'here it is, hope you like it. Call it what you want.' "He's a native of Baltimore, a musician who sports a rocker's hairdo and a diamond stud earring, an artist who makes fantastic sounds with his Ibanez guitar (which he endorses for the company)
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | April 14, 2008
Henry N. Baker Sr., a longtime jazz musician and the owner of a chain of beauty salons that changed the African-American hair care business in Baltimore, died April 7 at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 87. Born in New York City, he was the youngest of four children and the only son of a Georgia-born businessman and a homemaker. When he was still young, the family moved to Washington, where his father was shot and killed, plunging the family into poverty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | March 13, 2008
Carl Filipiak isn't one to shy away from contradictions -- he revels in them. When the Baltimore-born guitarist covers Jimi Hendrix tunes, he plays them note for note, unless it's "Voodoo Chile," which lends itself to a little more improvisation, but only the type of improvisation that coincides with the blues-rock period. On the other hand, when it comes to covering the Beatles' "A Day in the Life," Filipiak takes a different approach that involves scaling down the original epic orchestral composition in favor of a more streamlined, pop-based composition better suited for a four-piece band.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | December 2, 2007
Teddy P. Brains doesn't wear baggy jeans that droop below his waistline. Nor does he sass his elders, make trouble for his teachers or speak in slang-laced broken English. However, the 6-year-old African-American animated cartoon character does talk of being a marine biologist when he grows up. He's the valedictorian of his elementary school, where his favorite subject is math, and he enjoys traveling to exotic lands. Your child could learn much from him. Or at least that's the hope of Philadelphia-area video producers Eugene Haynes and Joseph L. Lewis III, creators of the DVD The Adventures of Teddy P. Brains, which was released in April.
NEWS
By Harold Fisher and Harold Fisher,Special to The Sun | October 7, 2007
At first blush, it's a bit hard to believe William Rhodes' art studio on St. Paul Street doubles as his home. Almost everything in the building is his creation. The three-story house in lower Charles Village breathes whimsy and oozes artsy textures even as you step through the front door of St. Paul Art and Design Studio. Just inside the house, the shine of the hardwood floor catches you off guard. Is it wet? The beams are the color of Sunday-morning sweet-maple syrup, and stretch from the large living room to a slightly smaller dining room.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | March 30, 2007
An art perfected by the late Charlie Byrd, who drew legions of fans to the Maryland Inn's King of France Tavern -- jazz continues to flourish in Annapolis. Attorney Elana Byrd and her husband, bassist Joe Byrd -- Charlie's brother -- are at the forefront of the local jazz scene with their weekly jam sessions at 49 West and in monthly concerts at Loews' Powerhouse. Its third floor can accommodate 100 patrons in a cozy, cabaret setting. The $20 cover charge and reasonably priced drinks provide an affordable evening.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 9, 2007
Amonthly film series highlighting African-American jazz musicians and their contributions to popular culture begins Tuesday at An die Musik Live, 409 N. Charles St., with Cartoons That Sing. The night will feature animation going back to the years before World War II, and will be replete with music from Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie (in 1962's Oscar-winning short, The Hole), Ella Fitzgerald, the Mills Brothers, Roberta Flack and others. Future series offerings include Baltimore Musicians in Film and Song (March 13)
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
How did a hot-shot school administrator get his start in education?"That's a funny story," says J. Edward "Ed" Andrews, deputy superintendent of Baltimore schools and formerly head of the Montgomery County schools."
NEWS
November 19, 1996
Bob Magness, 72, who ran a tiny cable television company out of his kitchen before building Tele-Communications Inc. into the nation's largest cable provider, died of cancer Friday in Denver.He created his first cable system 40 years ago in Memphis, Texas, climbing poles and stringing wires for 700 subscribers.He created the cable provider Community Television Inc. and its microwave distribution partnership, Western Microwave Inc., merging the two to create TCI when he moved to Denver in 1968.
NEWS
By THE ST. PETERSBURG (FLA.) TIMES | April 28, 2006
You cannot make something in the arts exciting for somebody who is raised looking at videos of the most well-buffed people in the world with their a-- hanging out."- WYNTON MARSALIS, jazz musician, on young people and the arts
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