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Jayne Torvill

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By RAY FRAGER | February 17, 1992
Oh, say, can you see? When it comes to CBS' coverage of the Winter Olympics, the answer is a resounding yes.It wasn't long ago that watching certain winter sports was a peekaboo affair. There goes the bobsled around the curve, and, wait a second, there it is again. Here's Franz Schussmeister in the downhill, and, let's cut to another camera, he should be bouncing over that hill any moment.No more. Now, it's every move you make, CBS will be watching you. That might not be good news if you're Franck Piccard falling on the top of the super-giant slalom course or the Puerto Rican bobsledders turning over, but it's terrific viewing.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
LANDOVER -- Their choice of music seemed fitting. More than a decade removed from winning the 1984 Olympic gold medal in Sarajevo, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean had switched from classical to pop, from "Bolero" to "Still Crazy After All These Years."Still winning, too.During a near-perfect performance in the World Professional Figure Skating Championships, the legendary British dance team showed a sellout crowd at USAir Arena on Saturday night that precise footwork and a little personality still beat dramatics.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1995
LANDOVER -- Their choice of music seemed fitting. More than a decade removed from winning the 1984 Olympic gold medal in Sarajevo, Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean had switched from classical to pop, from "Bolero" to "Still Crazy After All These Years."Still winning, too.During a near-perfect performance in the World Professional Figure Skating Championships, the legendary British dance team showed a sellout crowd at USAir Arena on Saturday night that precise footwork and a little personality still beat dramatics.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 17, 1992
Oh, say, can you see? When it comes to CBS' coverage of the Winter Olympics, the answer is a resounding yes.It wasn't long ago that watching certain winter sports was a peekaboo affair. There goes the bobsled around the curve, and, wait a second, there it is again. Here's Franz Schussmeister in the downhill, and, let's cut to another camera, he should be bouncing over that hill any moment.No more. Now, it's every move you make, CBS will be watching you. That might not be good news if you're Franck Piccard falling on the top of the super-giant slalom course or the Puerto Rican bobsledders turning over, but it's terrific viewing.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,Evening Sun Staff | December 7, 1990
They will skate to center ice during the World Professional Figure Skating Championships at the Capital Centre tomorrow night and a hush will fall over the house. They will be introduced as Torvill and Dean and anticipation will take over.Torvill and Dean. These are but aliases. Better that Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean assume the more appropriate last names of Creativity and Innovation.Two years these all-time greats have been waiting for just such an occasion. Dean explains: "When you do a show, as we've been doing for the last couple of years, creativity stops.
SPORTS
December 7, 1990
What: NutraSweet World Professional Figure Skating ChampionshipsSite: Capital Centre, Landover, tomorrow, 7 p.m.dTC Tickets: About 2,000 of 18,000 tickets are left. $35 and $22.50.Available by calling TicketCenter at 481-6000.TV: A tape of the 11th annual championships will be televised by NBC on "SportsWorld" Jan. 26-27.Women: Two-time defending champion Debi Thomas; Denise Biellmann, who defeated Thomas in the Challenge of Champions, the Moscow stop in this event; Elizabeth Manley of Canada, in her first pro competition since upsetting Thomas for the Olympic silver medal in Calgary in 1988; Rosalynn Sumners, the 1984 silver medalist and third-place finisher last year.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1994
HAMAR, Norway -- They danced the waltz. They danced the blues.And when it was over, a pair of teams from Russia were tied for the lead and the British legends Jayne Torvill and Christopher Dean were in third.The compulsory competition in ice dance at the Winter Olympics produced little in the way of drama last night.Maia Usova and Alexander Zhulin were in a first-place tie with Oksana Gritschuk and Yevgeny Platov.Torvill and Dean, back in the competitive skating world after 10 years on the ice show circuit, clung to third.
NEWS
February 12, 1994
The irony of the XVIIth Winter Olympiad that opens in Lillehammer, Norway, tonight is that these winter games were moved up a couple of years so as not to have to compete for attention in the same year with the Summer Olympics.Of course, that was before Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding became household names. (Has there ever been a plot that produced such unintended results? The attack on Ms. Kerrigan, with the intent of elevating Ms. Harding, has, in fact, made Ms. Kerrigan a white-hot commodity even if she does not medal in Lillehammer, while Ms. Harding's career potential is nil even if she does.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff writer | April 22, 1993
Frozen on the Baltimore Arena ice, Christopher Dean and Jayne Torvill balance in an intertwined stance, each supporting the other at an impossible angle, their flowing costumes forming a purple and orange "X."Does the pose have a name?"We call it 'Happy To Be There,' " says Mr. Dean. "That's a joke, because that's the end of our program."The British ice dancers, who won a gold medal at the 1984 Olympic Winter Games with their interpretation of Ravel's "Bolero," are among the headliners of the 1993 Tour of World Figure Skating Champions.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1995
LANDOVER -- For four days afterward, Alexander Zhulin and Maia Usova went back to the rink in Lake Placid, N.Y., where their friend and countryman, Sergei Grinkov, had died.For four days, they tried to skate, tried to prepare for an ice show that was ultimately postponed, tried to continue with their lives."We would skate for about 15 minutes, then we would stop and cry," Zhulin recalled yesterday.A week after Grinkov's death from a massive heart attack at age 28, these former world champion and 1994 Olympic silver medalist ice dancers went to perform at a show in New York's Central Park.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | July 20, 1991
'Dutch' not quite a treatMOVIES"Dutch" is not as bad as the trailer for the film suggests, but it's not as good as it could be, either. Some scenes work, others don't work at all. Ed O'Neill ("Married . . . With Children") plays a builder asked to pick up his girlfriend's son at a private school in Atlanta and bring him home for Thanksgiving vacation. The kid is obnoxious, and Dutch copes with it until he loses his patience. JoBeth Williams is the mother of the boy, and Ethan Randall is the boy who slowly warms to the man who will someday be his stepfather.
FEATURES
April 1, 1998
Looks like a lot of danger for Will Robinson today.A full day of episodes from "Lost in Space" (9 a.m. today-3 a.m. tomorrow, Sci-Fi), the 1965-1968 series about a stranded family, serves as a launching pad for Friday's opening of the new big-screen film starring William Hurt, Gary Oldman, Matt LeBlanc and Mimi Rogers.At a glance"Stories of Hope and Recovery: Addiction in Maryland" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Host Jeff Salkin leads viewers through a look at the hows and whys of addiction in the Free State.
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