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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 22, 1992
Washington -- Jay McInerney looks a little like Wally Cleaver by way of Princeton: Tall and boyish-looking at 37, he carries the imprint of time in Ivy League schools by dressing this mid-June day in blue blazer, white polo shirt and jeans. It's only when you hear the voice -- still slightly adenoidal, carrying through sarcasm the suggestion of a long-time smart-aleck -- that he seems, really, to be more like Eddie Haskell.That's apparent despite the advance buzz on his current publicity tour to promote his fourth novel, "Brightness Falls": that Jay McInerney, one-time literary Wunderkind and media hog, has, indeed, Mellowed and Settled Down.
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By DONNA RIFKIND and DONNA RIFKIND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2006
The Good Life Jay McInerney Alfred A. Knopf / 336 pages / $25 Ever since his blockbuster debut with Bright Lights, Big City in 1984, Jay McInerney has had an unsettled relationship with the rich, distracted New Yorkers who populate his novels. He has catalogued their self-indulgent behavior with a great deal of flair and perhaps too much affection, never managing to satirize them adequately even when satire was clearly his goal. This soft spot for his characters is McInerney's most attractive feature as a novelist as well as his greatest limitation.
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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 22, 1992
Washington Jay McInerney looks a little like Wally Cleaver by way of Princeton: Tall and boyish-looking at 37, he carries the imprint of time in Ivy League schools by dressing this mid-June day in blue blazer, white polo shirt and jeans. It's only when you hear the voice -- still slightly adenoidal, carrying through sarcasm the suggestion of a long-time smart-aleck -- that he seems, really, to be more like Eddie Haskell.That's apparent despite the advance buzz on his current publicity tour to promote his fourth novel, "Brightness Falls": that Jay McInerney, one-time literary Wunderkind and media hog, has, indeed, Mellowed and Settled Down.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | August 21, 2005
NOVEL LUNAR PARK By Bret Easton Ellis. Alfred A. Knopf. 308 pages. Bret Easton Ellis needs no introduction. Not because his first novel, Less Than Zero, was a "zeitgeist touchstone," or because he has been profiled in "every magazine and newspaper that existed," or because his name is as "recognizable as most movie stars' or athletes'." No, it is because, for those of you who may not be aware of these facts, the author notes all of the above and more in his handy 30-page preface to Lunar Park, which constitutes his sixth novel, or, if you will, a gathering of "controlled, cinematic haiku."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 7, 2002
Bacchus & Me: Adventures in the Wine Cellar, by Jay McInerney (Vintage paperback, 278 pages, $13). For a dozen years in the 1970s and 1980s, I wrote a weekly newspaper column on wine while earning an honest living editing editorial pages and opinion columns. It began largely because in the early 1970s my fellow editors at The Philadelphia Inquirer and I could not find a syndicated column that we trusted. Already a serious enthusiast, I learned a lot, had a great deal of fun and continued to find that though there was a swiftly increasing tribe of wine writers, few of them offered much in the way of delight.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | April 23, 1995
In a creative twist, Details for May puts recovering porn star Traci Lords on its cover. Her story, told by writer Chris Heath, has more drama than most pop profiles: a rape at 11, four years of underage skin flicks, a few cocaine overdoses and finally a struggle for legitimacy and self-empowerment.It's hard not to enjoy watching Ms. Lords make hay of her notoriety, with clothed acting stints on TV hits "Roseanne" and "Melrose Place," and a Top 10 dance single, "Control." "Nobody made me do anything," she says.
FEATURES
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | September 13, 1998
"Model Behavior," by Jay McInerney. Knopf. 272 pages. $24.The title piece of Jay McInerney's new book is a novella about Connor McKnight, a magazine journalist who is dating a model named Philomena Briggs and who is also late in turning in a profile of a hot actor, Chip Ralston, because the superstar is avoiding him. This tale is, in short, the stuff of superficiality, a characteristic emphasized by the way McInerney divides his 176-page story into bite-size sections with breezy subtitles such as "What She Saw In Connor" and "Attack of the Five-Foot Salary-Man."
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | June 21, 1993
BRIGHTNESS FALLS. By Jay McInerney. Vintag Contemporaries. 416 pages. $12. ALTHOUGH the Reagan-Bush era only recently ended, writer Jay McInerney heard the bells tolling for it years ago. In his 1984 novel, "Bright Lights, Big City," Mr. McInerney predicted the end simply by using the fundamental law of gravity: What goes up must come down. Mr. McInerney's vision of the shallowness of success inspired an entire corpus of yuppie philosophers intent on exposing the dark side of Reagan-era prosperity.
NEWS
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 1996
The Last of the Savages," by Jay McInerney. Knopf. 271 pages. $24.Jay McInerney is no F. Scott Fitzgerald. To be sure, his new novel, "The Last of the Savages," invites us to recognize him as a Fitzgerald for our time; it earnestly imports themes from "The Great Gatsby" into the late 20h century. But if McInerney would emulate Fitzgerald, he'd be well advised to keep his name in the gossip pages, where it has been, off and on, since his splashy 1984 debut with "Bright Lights, Big City." His dissolute literary celebrity does far more to invoke the Jazz Age chronicler than the lackluster writing in this novel.
NEWS
By DONNA RIFKIND and DONNA RIFKIND,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2006
The Good Life Jay McInerney Alfred A. Knopf / 336 pages / $25 Ever since his blockbuster debut with Bright Lights, Big City in 1984, Jay McInerney has had an unsettled relationship with the rich, distracted New Yorkers who populate his novels. He has catalogued their self-indulgent behavior with a great deal of flair and perhaps too much affection, never managing to satirize them adequately even when satire was clearly his goal. This soft spot for his characters is McInerney's most attractive feature as a novelist as well as his greatest limitation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 7, 2002
Bacchus & Me: Adventures in the Wine Cellar, by Jay McInerney (Vintage paperback, 278 pages, $13). For a dozen years in the 1970s and 1980s, I wrote a weekly newspaper column on wine while earning an honest living editing editorial pages and opinion columns. It began largely because in the early 1970s my fellow editors at The Philadelphia Inquirer and I could not find a syndicated column that we trusted. Already a serious enthusiast, I learned a lot, had a great deal of fun and continued to find that though there was a swiftly increasing tribe of wine writers, few of them offered much in the way of delight.
FEATURES
By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | September 13, 1998
"Model Behavior," by Jay McInerney. Knopf. 272 pages. $24.The title piece of Jay McInerney's new book is a novella about Connor McKnight, a magazine journalist who is dating a model named Philomena Briggs and who is also late in turning in a profile of a hot actor, Chip Ralston, because the superstar is avoiding him. This tale is, in short, the stuff of superficiality, a characteristic emphasized by the way McInerney divides his 176-page story into bite-size sections with breezy subtitles such as "What She Saw In Connor" and "Attack of the Five-Foot Salary-Man."
NEWS
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 1996
The Last of the Savages," by Jay McInerney. Knopf. 271 pages. $24.Jay McInerney is no F. Scott Fitzgerald. To be sure, his new novel, "The Last of the Savages," invites us to recognize him as a Fitzgerald for our time; it earnestly imports themes from "The Great Gatsby" into the late 20h century. But if McInerney would emulate Fitzgerald, he'd be well advised to keep his name in the gossip pages, where it has been, off and on, since his splashy 1984 debut with "Bright Lights, Big City." His dissolute literary celebrity does far more to invoke the Jazz Age chronicler than the lackluster writing in this novel.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | April 23, 1995
In a creative twist, Details for May puts recovering porn star Traci Lords on its cover. Her story, told by writer Chris Heath, has more drama than most pop profiles: a rape at 11, four years of underage skin flicks, a few cocaine overdoses and finally a struggle for legitimacy and self-empowerment.It's hard not to enjoy watching Ms. Lords make hay of her notoriety, with clothed acting stints on TV hits "Roseanne" and "Melrose Place," and a Top 10 dance single, "Control." "Nobody made me do anything," she says.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | June 21, 1993
BRIGHTNESS FALLS. By Jay McInerney. Vintag Contemporaries. 416 pages. $12. ALTHOUGH the Reagan-Bush era only recently ended, writer Jay McInerney heard the bells tolling for it years ago. In his 1984 novel, "Bright Lights, Big City," Mr. McInerney predicted the end simply by using the fundamental law of gravity: What goes up must come down. Mr. McInerney's vision of the shallowness of success inspired an entire corpus of yuppie philosophers intent on exposing the dark side of Reagan-era prosperity.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 22, 1992
Washington -- Jay McInerney looks a little like Wally Cleaver by way of Princeton: Tall and boyish-looking at 37, he carries the imprint of time in Ivy League schools by dressing this mid-June day in blue blazer, white polo shirt and jeans. It's only when you hear the voice -- still slightly adenoidal, carrying through sarcasm the suggestion of a long-time smart-aleck -- that he seems, really, to be more like Eddie Haskell.That's apparent despite the advance buzz on his current publicity tour to promote his fourth novel, "Brightness Falls": that Jay McInerney, one-time literary Wunderkind and media hog, has, indeed, Mellowed and Settled Down.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lizzie Skurnick and Lizzie Skurnick,Special to the Sun | August 21, 2005
NOVEL LUNAR PARK By Bret Easton Ellis. Alfred A. Knopf. 308 pages. Bret Easton Ellis needs no introduction. Not because his first novel, Less Than Zero, was a "zeitgeist touchstone," or because he has been profiled in "every magazine and newspaper that existed," or because his name is as "recognizable as most movie stars' or athletes'." No, it is because, for those of you who may not be aware of these facts, the author notes all of the above and more in his handy 30-page preface to Lunar Park, which constitutes his sixth novel, or, if you will, a gathering of "controlled, cinematic haiku."
NEWS
By Dan Vitale | May 31, 1992
BRIGHTNESS FALLS.Jay McInerney.Knopf.420 pages. $23.Set in New York City in 1987, the year that featured the October "Black Monday" stock market crash, "Brightness Falls" is Jay McInerney's fourth and most ambitious novel. In it, he attempts to document the excesses of the '80s as experienced and/or perpetrated by a representative cross section of Manhattan's high life and low life, with emphasis decidedly on the former.Tom Wolfe blazed this trail five years ago in "The Bonfire of the Vanities," and Mr. McInerney's book is clearly modeled on it. Even Mr. McInerney's prose is Wolfe-like, at least in its initial attempts to provide a panoramic view of social chaos:"After nearly collapsing in bankruptcy during the seventies, [the]
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | June 22, 1992
Washington Jay McInerney looks a little like Wally Cleaver by way of Princeton: Tall and boyish-looking at 37, he carries the imprint of time in Ivy League schools by dressing this mid-June day in blue blazer, white polo shirt and jeans. It's only when you hear the voice -- still slightly adenoidal, carrying through sarcasm the suggestion of a long-time smart-aleck -- that he seems, really, to be more like Eddie Haskell.That's apparent despite the advance buzz on his current publicity tour to promote his fourth novel, "Brightness Falls": that Jay McInerney, one-time literary Wunderkind and media hog, has, indeed, Mellowed and Settled Down.
NEWS
By Dan Vitale | May 31, 1992
BRIGHTNESS FALLS.Jay McInerney.Knopf.420 pages. $23.Set in New York City in 1987, the year that featured the October "Black Monday" stock market crash, "Brightness Falls" is Jay McInerney's fourth and most ambitious novel. In it, he attempts to document the excesses of the '80s as experienced and/or perpetrated by a representative cross section of Manhattan's high life and low life, with emphasis decidedly on the former.Tom Wolfe blazed this trail five years ago in "The Bonfire of the Vanities," and Mr. McInerney's book is clearly modeled on it. Even Mr. McInerney's prose is Wolfe-like, at least in its initial attempts to provide a panoramic view of social chaos:"After nearly collapsing in bankruptcy during the seventies, [the]
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