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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2003
Javy Lopez intended to fly from San Diego to his Georgia home yesterday until the Orioles changed his travel plans. This was one instance where Lopez didn't mind being rerouted. Expected to arrive in Baltimore last night, Lopez is scheduled to take his team and insurance physicals early today. Once he passes them, he'll officially become part of the organization and another jackpot for club executives Jim Beattie and Mike Flanagan. "I guess I can say we're pretty confident that things are going in the right direction," Flanagan said.
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March 14, 2007
On the Orioles deciding not to play Jay Gibbons at first base Javy [Lopez] found a way to get hurt as a full-time DH last year. Can Gibbons find a way to do the same? In theory, DH-ing should reduce wear and tear, which should decrease his injury odds. The problem with Gibbons is that he was given a big contract ... considering the fact that he is a DH who should only hit against [right-handed pitching].
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January 13, 2007
Good morning --Rockies-- First Javy, then Rodrigo. How long before you bring in Luis Lopez?
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January 13, 2007
Good morning --Rockies-- First Javy, then Rodrigo. How long before you bring in Luis Lopez?
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January 12, 2007
On Javy Lopez joining the Colorado Rockies Actually, if you were to pick one location to put the guy, it would be Colorado. Power has always been Javy's only contribution, and Coors Field will only magnify that. Good for Javy. Maybe Rodrigo Lopez is a Rockie soon? Is the rumor true that there's a shortage of catchers? They seem like left-handed relievers; anyone will do, and anyone will take a chance on one.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2004
If you were one of the people who thought Javy Lopez's 43 home runs in 2003 were a fluke, a career year he would never replicate, then he gave you plenty of opportunities to reconsider that position last night against the Boston Red Sox. Lopez, who signed with the Orioles in the offseason after 10 years with the Atlanta Braves, turned on a first-pitch 89 mph fastball from Pedro Martinez in the second inning and drove it 370 feet into the left-field bleachers...
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By DAN CONNOLLY AND JEFF ZREBIEC and DAN CONNOLLY AND JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTERS | January 27, 2006
Although displaced Orioles catcher Javy Lopez appreciated meeting with team officials on Wednesday, his thoughts about the coming season haven't changed. He either wants a contract extension by mid-February or he wants to be traded to a place where he can catch more often, Lopez's agent, Chuck Berry, said yesterday. "Javy's adamant that he wants something done before the beginning of spring training," Berry said. "The ball is in their court at this time." Club executive vice president Mike Flanagan and vice president Jim Duquette met with Lopez on Wednesday in Atlanta, where he lives in the offseason.
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By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2003
If the Orioles decide to spend their money on a free-agent catcher this offseason, there's a better chance it will be Javy Lopez than their old, familiar dance partner, Ivan Rodriguez. From what Orioles officials have gathered, Rodriguez still has steeper contract demands than Lopez, who hit .328 with 43 home runs and 109 RBIs for the Atlanta Braves last season. So one year after falling short in their attempts to sign Rodriguez to a long-term deal, the Orioles have turned their attention to Lopez.
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By Roch Kubatko and Peter Schmuck and Roch Kubatko and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
When catcher Javy Lopez sprained his left ankle when the New York Mets' Robin Ventura slid into it during a Sept. 30 game, Atlanta Braves manager Bobby Cox assumed his catcher would be lost for at least two rounds of the playoffs. Imagine his surprise when Lopez felt good enough to enter Game 1 of the National League Championship Series as a pinch-hitter, and start Game 2. Talk about a fast healer. "With a high-ankle sprain, it generally takes six to eight weeks," Cox said. "The best that we could get from a doctor would be six to eight weeks, and a chance for the World Series.
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By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
The Javy Lopez saga took another turn yesterday as Chuck Berry, the agent for the displaced catcher, rescinded his trade demand in a conversation with Orioles executives. "We've had several additional discussions this week with the Orioles, and we have withdrawn our trade demand," Berry said. "We have decided that Javy will go to spring training with the Orioles." The change of heart - the second for an Oriole this offseason after shortstop Miguel Tejada's withdrawal of his trade request last month - comes exactly a week after Berry had told The Sun that Lopez was "adamant" that he either wanted to have his contract extended, or he wanted to be traded, before reporting to spring training.
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By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | June 5, 2006
It started in the offseason when Javy Lopez and his agent told Orioles officials that the displaced catcher would be open to a trade. Then came a short stint as the Orioles' everyday first baseman, an experiment that ended days before the team exited spring training and headed north. Lopez was growing to tolerate his role as the Orioles' designated hitter when a back injury sent him to the disabled list. Now a whirlwind five months has brought perhaps the most jarring change of Lopez's career.
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By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | February 16, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- A smiling Javy Lopez arrived at the Orioles' spring training facility yesterday and immediately thrust himself into his new role. Pounding the pocket of a new first baseman's mitt that he had just pulled from a package at his locker, Lopez bent down and got into a fielding position as if a sharply hit ground ball were headed in his direction. A look of satisfaction on his face, Lopez placed the glove back on the top shelf of his locker and joked that it would become a Gold Glove.
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By JEFF ZREBIEC and JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
The Javy Lopez saga took another turn yesterday as Chuck Berry, the agent for the displaced catcher, rescinded his trade demand in a conversation with Orioles executives. "We've had several additional discussions this week with the Orioles, and we have withdrawn our trade demand," Berry said. "We have decided that Javy will go to spring training with the Orioles." The change of heart - the second for an Oriole this offseason after shortstop Miguel Tejada's withdrawal of his trade request last month - comes exactly a week after Berry had told The Sun that Lopez was "adamant" that he either wanted to have his contract extended, or he wanted to be traded, before reporting to spring training.
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By DAN CONNOLLY AND JEFF ZREBIEC and DAN CONNOLLY AND JEFF ZREBIEC,SUN REPORTERS | January 27, 2006
Although displaced Orioles catcher Javy Lopez appreciated meeting with team officials on Wednesday, his thoughts about the coming season haven't changed. He either wants a contract extension by mid-February or he wants to be traded to a place where he can catch more often, Lopez's agent, Chuck Berry, said yesterday. "Javy's adamant that he wants something done before the beginning of spring training," Berry said. "The ball is in their court at this time." Club executive vice president Mike Flanagan and vice president Jim Duquette met with Lopez on Wednesday in Atlanta, where he lives in the offseason.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - He stood beside Rafael Palmeiro on the right side of the infield, the mitt on Javy Lopez's left hand looking so different from the model he wears when crouching behind home plate. Lopez scooped up a grounder and waited for the next ball to come, sometimes directly at his feet, other times toward the line. And so an experiment had begun. An All-Star catcher with the Atlanta Braves, Lopez was playing the part of backup first baseman in the Orioles' spring training camp.
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By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2004
If you were one of the people who thought Javy Lopez's 43 home runs in 2003 were a fluke, a career year he would never replicate, then he gave you plenty of opportunities to reconsider that position last night against the Boston Red Sox. Lopez, who signed with the Orioles in the offseason after 10 years with the Atlanta Braves, turned on a first-pitch 89 mph fastball from Pedro Martinez in the second inning and drove it 370 feet into the left-field bleachers...
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - He stood beside Rafael Palmeiro on the right side of the infield, the mitt on Javy Lopez's left hand looking so different from the model he wears when crouching behind home plate. Lopez scooped up a grounder and waited for the next ball to come, sometimes directly at his feet, other times toward the line. And so an experiment had begun. An All-Star catcher with the Atlanta Braves, Lopez was playing the part of backup first baseman in the Orioles' spring training camp.
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By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Orioles reliever Rick Bauer would sit in the bullpen during games last season, glance at the score and anticipate the outcome. He didn't use a mathematical formula or some other sophisticated system. The lineup provided all the evidence he needed. Without guys like Miguel Tejada, Rafael Palmeiro and Javy Lopez in the middle, he had a pretty good idea the Orioles were going to stay behind. The size of the deficit wasn't important. "If we got down by two runs in the fifth inning, it didn't look good at all. We almost had no shot," he said.
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