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By Daniel Grant | April 18, 1993
JASPER JOHNS: 35 YEARS WITH LEO CASTELLI.Edited by Susan Brundage.Harry N. Abrams.100 pages. $35. The last 35 years have been quite good for Jasper Johns, an artist who gained immediate renown in 1958 with his first exhibition of paintings of American flags and targets at New York City's Leo Castelli Gallery.The show was good for both artist and dealer, in fact, as it helped to establish Castelli as a dealer to watch.But Johns was an artist who dared to move away from the strict canons of abstract expressionism (that art is about its own materials, shapes, colors, volumes and processes)
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By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
At first glance, the Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair looks like a low-wattage shindig. To the casual observer, the occasional gallery visitor, names like Barbara Takenaga, Deborah Kass and Madeleine Keesing have little resonance. That's because few in the printmaking world are household names. But the fair, held this weekend at the Baltimore Museum of Art , has been a showcase for leading printmakers, well-known and obscure, for over 20 years. This year, over 2,000 prints from some 20 presses, publishers and dealers will be on display, for prices ranging from the affordable to the downright indulgent.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 19, 2001
Jasper Johns, whose paintings of flags, targets, numerals, logos and other commonplace signs made him one of the most important American artists of the postwar era, occupies a curiously ambiguous position on the cusp of modern and contemporary art. Johns' breakthrough painting, the enigmatic and eponymously titled Flag of 1954-1955, was both an extension of the modernist aesthetic of abstract expressionism and a harbinger of the pop art of the 1960s, which,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 19, 2001
Jasper Johns, whose paintings of flags, targets, numerals, logos and other commonplace signs made him one of the most important American artists of the postwar era, occupies a curiously ambiguous position on the cusp of modern and contemporary art. Johns' breakthrough painting, the enigmatic and eponymously titled Flag of 1954-1955, was both an extension of the modernist aesthetic of abstract expressionism and a harbinger of the pop art of the 1960s, which,...
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 27, 1996
NEW YORK -- Imagine it's 1910, and you have a chance to see mammoth exhibits covering the careers of Renoir and Monet, two of the most important artists alive. That's the kind of opportunity that awaits us right now in New York.Jasper Johns and Ellsworth Kelly are two of the acknowledged giants of American art in the second half of the 20th century, and we can see both of them, whole, at the same time.At the Museum of Modern Art, we can probe the luscious surfaces of Johns' art for the truths contained within.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
At first glance, the Baltimore Contemporary Print Fair looks like a low-wattage shindig. To the casual observer, the occasional gallery visitor, names like Barbara Takenaga, Deborah Kass and Madeleine Keesing have little resonance. That's because few in the printmaking world are household names. But the fair, held this weekend at the Baltimore Museum of Art , has been a showcase for leading printmakers, well-known and obscure, for over 20 years. This year, over 2,000 prints from some 20 presses, publishers and dealers will be on display, for prices ranging from the affordable to the downright indulgent.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 23, 1992
Of Jasper Johns' eight works in the Baltimore Museum of Art's just-opened print show, perhaps "Untitled (Ruler) II" (1969) best shows how Johns has managed to anticipate or embrace so much of what contemporary art has been about and still remain so completely himself.It consists of a black ground, on which are the image of a ruler and the streaks created by the scraping of the ruler across the ground. From a distance, the image is abstract and has much of the intensity and dynamism of Grace Hartigan's two nearby abstract expressionist lithographs.
FEATURES
April 16, 1991
New York contemporary art dealer Brooke Alexander will speak at the Baltimore Museum of Art on "Collecting Contemporary Art" tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. His lecture will be given in conjunction with the museum's contemporary print fair Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at which 20 East Coast dealers will offer prints. Call 396-6345.Among dealers participating will be Mr. Alexander, B. R. Kornblatt Gallery, Robert Brown Contemporary Art and Mary Ryan Gallery. Artists whose work will be for sale include John Baldessari, Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Susan Rothenberg, Pat Steir and Frank Stella.
NEWS
March 12, 2008
Student exhibit -- Annapolis City Hall, 160 Duke of Gloucester St., will exhibit Out of Bounds, featuring sketches and photographs by students in the University of Maryland's School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation's study abroad programs, through March 31. 301- 405-2166. Exhibit -- St. John's College's Mitchell Gallery will exhibit Robert Motherwell and Jasper Johns: Poetic Works as Metaphor, through April 18 at 60 College Ave., Annapolis. 410-626-2556. Mixed media exhibit -- The Maryland Federation of Art will present its 31st annual Art on Paper, a national juried exhibition featuring 51 works, through April 13 at its Circle Gallery, 18 State Circle, Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | April 25, 1996
The Baltimore Museum of Art's annual print fair is the only one in the country dedicated exclusively to contemporary prints.Like its predecessors, the seventh annual fair this weekend will feature leading dealers from New York and elsewhere, who will be glad to talk to you about prints whether you're buying or not. So will the museum's curators, who will be on hand throughout the fair.This year's dealers include Brooke Alexander, Barbara Krakow, Matthew Marks, Marlborough, Pyramid Atlantic and Solo Impression.
NEWS
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | October 27, 1996
NEW YORK -- Imagine it's 1910, and you have a chance to see mammoth exhibits covering the careers of Renoir and Monet, two of the most important artists alive. That's the kind of opportunity that awaits us right now in New York.Jasper Johns and Ellsworth Kelly are two of the acknowledged giants of American art in the second half of the 20th century, and we can see both of them, whole, at the same time.At the Museum of Modern Art, we can probe the luscious surfaces of Johns' art for the truths contained within.
NEWS
By Daniel Grant | April 18, 1993
JASPER JOHNS: 35 YEARS WITH LEO CASTELLI.Edited by Susan Brundage.Harry N. Abrams.100 pages. $35. The last 35 years have been quite good for Jasper Johns, an artist who gained immediate renown in 1958 with his first exhibition of paintings of American flags and targets at New York City's Leo Castelli Gallery.The show was good for both artist and dealer, in fact, as it helped to establish Castelli as a dealer to watch.But Johns was an artist who dared to move away from the strict canons of abstract expressionism (that art is about its own materials, shapes, colors, volumes and processes)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 23, 1992
Of Jasper Johns' eight works in the Baltimore Museum of Art's just-opened print show, perhaps "Untitled (Ruler) II" (1969) best shows how Johns has managed to anticipate or embrace so much of what contemporary art has been about and still remain so completely himself.It consists of a black ground, on which are the image of a ruler and the streaks created by the scraping of the ruler across the ground. From a distance, the image is abstract and has much of the intensity and dynamism of Grace Hartigan's two nearby abstract expressionist lithographs.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | January 11, 2003
Three works by modern masters Willem de Kooning, Agnes Martin and Roy Lichtenstein are the latest in a series of gifts from Jane and Robert Meyerhoff that have transformed the National Galley of Art's postwar art collection. The acquisition, announced yesterday, brings to 49 the number of works given to the Washington museum by the Meyerhoffs, who live at Fitzhugh Farm in Phoenix in Baltimore County. "Their connoisseurship and generosity continue to help the gallery build a superb contemporary collection," Earl A. Powell III, the director of the National Gallery, said in a statement.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 28, 2002
What motivates the passionate collector? That is a question even the experts can't answer completely. Every collector is unique, and people collect artworks for widely varying reasons. But one thing they all have in common is an intense interest in the world around them and a desire to engage it through the objects they collect. Over the past 25 years, Eli and Edythe L. Broad of Los Angeles have assembled one of the finest collections of contemporary art in the United States. Like most collectors, the Broads were motivated as much by their passionate involvement with people and ideas as by their love of art. The commitment they made to the art of our time reflects their belief that artistic creativity is a vital element of any thriving civic community.
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