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Jason Priestley

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By Newsday | December 25, 2003
Images die hard, which might be one reason Jason Priestley comes across as so chipper about his movie career. As Brandon Walsh on Beverly Hills, 90210, the clean-cut Canadian actor melted teen-age hearts across the continent. Even though he's now 34, Priestley's still having fun living it down, as he does with zeal in Die, Mommie, Die! The comedy, adapted from actor-dramatist Charles Busch's drag-queen paean to Joan Crawford melodramas, is one of those over-the-top satires perfect for any celebrity looking to go dishy.
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NEWS
By From Sun news services | July 11, 2009
Michael Jackson's drug history to be probed Detectives investigating the death of Michael Jackson are looking at his prescription drug history and trying to talk with his numerous former doctors, the Los Angeles police chief said. Jackson's father, Joe Jackson, told ABC News in an interview that he believed "foul play" was involved in his son's death. But in the interview aired Friday on Good Morning America, Jackson did not elaborate. Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton told CNN that police are waiting for the coroner's report before ruling out any possibilities in their "comprehensive" investigation into the sudden death of the 50-year-old pop star two weeks ago. The coroner's report will determine the cause of death and hinges on time-consuming toxicology tests.
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FEATURES
By Beth Hannan and Beth Hannan,Contributing Writer | March 2, 1994
90210 -- if you don't know what zip code this is, you aren't a teen or the parent of one. "Beverly Hills, 90210," which debuted ++ in October 1990, is celebrating its 100th episode tonight.In the beginning, the show didn't make much of a splash. The title didn't indicate it was about high school students, no one had ever heard of the stars, and it was on the tiny Fox network. Critics mostly ignored it.But gradually, the show built a following with young viewers. By the summer of 1991, it was a certified hit.The idea was to show the real-life problems of teens, from their perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Newsday | December 25, 2003
Images die hard, which might be one reason Jason Priestley comes across as so chipper about his movie career. As Brandon Walsh on Beverly Hills, 90210, the clean-cut Canadian actor melted teen-age hearts across the continent. Even though he's now 34, Priestley's still having fun living it down, as he does with zeal in Die, Mommie, Die! The comedy, adapted from actor-dramatist Charles Busch's drag-queen paean to Joan Crawford melodramas, is one of those over-the-top satires perfect for any celebrity looking to go dishy.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 10, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- "Homicide: The Movie" will be one of NBC's showcase events during February sweeps, the network announced here yesterday. It will air Feb. 13. But, while the door was left open to future "Homicide" movies, executive producer Tom Fontana said the film was intended to be a final farewell to the acclaimed series. "In terms of the shooting of it, the movie turned out to be a remarkable closure and celebration for us," Fontana said during a press conference at the winter press tour.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 27, 1994
Repeat after me. Repeat after me. Repeat after me. Whatever TV show is talking tonight, that's how it's warning you about what's coming next.* "Full House." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Whenever I say that "Full House" is this generation's "The Brady Bunch," I don't mean it as a compliment. I also don't mean for it to be taken quite this literally: On tonight's show, Barry Williams of "The Brady Bunch" is a guest star. ABC repeat.* "Quick Change." (8-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Randy Quaid very broad and funny in this 1990 comedy, which stars Bill Murray, Geena Davis and Quaid as bumbling bank robbers.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | July 11, 2009
Michael Jackson's drug history to be probed Detectives investigating the death of Michael Jackson are looking at his prescription drug history and trying to talk with his numerous former doctors, the Los Angeles police chief said. Jackson's father, Joe Jackson, told ABC News in an interview that he believed "foul play" was involved in his son's death. But in the interview aired Friday on Good Morning America, Jackson did not elaborate. Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton told CNN that police are waiting for the coroner's report before ruling out any possibilities in their "comprehensive" investigation into the sudden death of the 50-year-old pop star two weeks ago. The coroner's report will determine the cause of death and hinges on time-consuming toxicology tests.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 4, 1990
"Beverly Hills, 90210" is supposed to be a family drama. But it's mainly a teen drama -- lots of teen, not much drama.That's the story in the 90-minute pilot, which premieres at 8:30 tonight on WBFF-TV (Channel 45), anyway.The new Fox series is ostensibly about a family of four, the Walshes, that relocates from Minneapolis to Beverly Hills when the father of the family gets a job transfer. (The 90210 in the title is the zip code in Beverly Hills to which the family relocates.) But the father (played by James Eckhouse)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 9, 1994
What's a critic to recommend tonight? "The Critic," naturally -- as well as the repeat of a fascinating documentary on the Beatles.* "National Geographic Special: 'Reflections on Elephants' " (8-9 p.m., WMPT, Channel 22) -- Last year's "National Geographic" special on zoo keepers had a long and captivating segment on elephants, showing how one particular zoo keeper had gone to great lengths to make his pachyderms feel at home. Here's an entire special devoted to a similar approach, in which filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert observe elephants in the wild, focusing on behavior not necessarily associated with these large and usually docile beasts.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 10, 1998
Much has been made recently of "Lolita," Adrian Lyne's adaptation of the Vladimir Nabokov novel that never acquired theatrical release in the United States. Well, be of good cheer: Nabokov lives -- if not in adaptation, at least in spirit -- in "Love and Death on Long Island," Richard Kwietniowski's jewel of a film starring John Hurt.Sexual obsession, dislocation, mortality and the alienated freedom of a European abroad in contemporary American pop culture are explored in this film, which also recalls "Death in Venice" in its rich irony and its main character.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 10, 2000
LOS ANGELES -- "Homicide: The Movie" will be one of NBC's showcase events during February sweeps, the network announced here yesterday. It will air Feb. 13. But, while the door was left open to future "Homicide" movies, executive producer Tom Fontana said the film was intended to be a final farewell to the acclaimed series. "In terms of the shooting of it, the movie turned out to be a remarkable closure and celebration for us," Fontana said during a press conference at the winter press tour.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 27, 1994
Repeat after me. Repeat after me. Repeat after me. Whatever TV show is talking tonight, that's how it's warning you about what's coming next.* "Full House." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Whenever I say that "Full House" is this generation's "The Brady Bunch," I don't mean it as a compliment. I also don't mean for it to be taken quite this literally: On tonight's show, Barry Williams of "The Brady Bunch" is a guest star. ABC repeat.* "Quick Change." (8-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Randy Quaid very broad and funny in this 1990 comedy, which stars Bill Murray, Geena Davis and Quaid as bumbling bank robbers.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan and Beth Hannan,Contributing Writer | March 2, 1994
90210 -- if you don't know what zip code this is, you aren't a teen or the parent of one. "Beverly Hills, 90210," which debuted ++ in October 1990, is celebrating its 100th episode tonight.In the beginning, the show didn't make much of a splash. The title didn't indicate it was about high school students, no one had ever heard of the stars, and it was on the tiny Fox network. Critics mostly ignored it.But gradually, the show built a following with young viewers. By the summer of 1991, it was a certified hit.The idea was to show the real-life problems of teens, from their perspective.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 9, 1994
What's a critic to recommend tonight? "The Critic," naturally -- as well as the repeat of a fascinating documentary on the Beatles.* "National Geographic Special: 'Reflections on Elephants' " (8-9 p.m., WMPT, Channel 22) -- Last year's "National Geographic" special on zoo keepers had a long and captivating segment on elephants, showing how one particular zoo keeper had gone to great lengths to make his pachyderms feel at home. Here's an entire special devoted to a similar approach, in which filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert observe elephants in the wild, focusing on behavior not necessarily associated with these large and usually docile beasts.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 4, 1990
"Beverly Hills, 90210" is supposed to be a family drama. But it's mainly a teen drama -- lots of teen, not much drama.That's the story in the 90-minute pilot, which premieres at 8:30 tonight on WBFF-TV (Channel 45), anyway.The new Fox series is ostensibly about a family of four, the Walshes, that relocates from Minneapolis to Beverly Hills when the father of the family gets a job transfer. (The 90210 in the title is the zip code in Beverly Hills to which the family relocates.) But the father (played by James Eckhouse)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 31, 2003
Die Mommie Die! is an odd little film, Douglas Sirk as channeled through John Waters. Starring a man playing a woman and featuring a Beverly Hills 90210 alumnus as the bisexual love interest, it flaunts some conventions, breaks others and tries to stand alone while invoking the ghosts of a handful of movie genres past. In the end, it's probably too wicked for its own good, but its determination to seek its own ground demands, at the least, respect. Charles Busch, in a singular performance that's out there without being outrageous (there's not a whole lot to measure him against)
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 7, 1994
Tonight marks the 15th anniversary of ESPN, which marks the occasion, in part, by televising something even older (a 24-year-old Bud Greenspan documentary) about something older still (major league baseball from 1896-1916). It also marks the season premieres of "Beverly Hills, 90210" and "Models Inc." on Fox, and the arrival of a lot of nonfiction TV offerings.* "Kennedy Center Presents" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 22) -- "A Salute to Slava" is the debut presentation of this new PBS series, and it collects many eminent talents to honor Mstislav Rostropovich, the departing National Symphony Orchestra music director.
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