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Jason Collins

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NEWS
May 7, 2013
What does it say about our society when the sports and national news headlines as well as social media are all saturated with reports of a professional athlete's sexual orientation ("NBA player Jason Collins coming out is a defining moment in sports," April 29)? Who really cares? What kind of people care about someone's choice of partners? I don't understand why anyone chooses to tell the world that they prefer one sex over the other. That is a personal choice and only people with too much time on their hands or an unnatural desire to know about everyone else's private business will feel the need to know this information.
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SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Jeff Barker | February 11, 2014
As a Maryland football player, Akil Patterson felt pangs of disappointment every time he typed the words "gay athlete" into an online search engine, hoping against hope to find someone else like him. Patterson reflected Monday on how different the culture has become since he came out in 2006 - after leaving Maryland. When he heard Missouri defensive end and NFL prospect Michael Sam announce Sunday night that he is gay, Patterson marveled at Sam's inner strength and at the support now available to gay athletes.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 29, 2013
Maybe you yawned when you heard the news. Or maybe you just shrugged when you heard about Jason Collins and said: "What's the big deal?" But it's a very big deal. First active male player in a major team sport to declare he's gay? In the macho world of the NBA, where a player like Tim Hardaway once hissed "I hate gay people" before the ensuing backlash had him backpedaling like a fighter trying to avoid another haymaker? Oh, it's a very big deal. Now Collins, a 34-year-old journeyman center for six teams over 12 seasons, comes out of the closet and makes history.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
President Barack Obama briefly reiterated his commitment to LGBT equality around the globe in a section of Tuesday night's State of the Union speech, but he did not address the stalled Employment Non-Discrimination Act or whether he would issue an executive order to prohibit discrimination against LGBT employees by federal contractors. In a larger discussion about American ideals and the United States' opportunities to "promote understanding around the globe," Obama suggested the nation is in part defined by its belief " in the inherent dignity and equality of every human being, regardless of race or religion, creed or sexual orientation.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
ANAHEIM, Calif. - It used to be that basketball, among other things, was where the Collins twins of Stanford differed. Jarron, a 6-foot-11 forward who can play inside or out, had been a key player for the Cardinal from the beginning, contributing to the team's Final Four run in 1998. Jason, on the other hand, had known only disappointment because of injuries that ended each of his first two years. But unlike the hair (thick for Jason, close for Jarron) and neatness (Jarron very, Jason not so)
NEWS
April 30, 2013
NBA center Jason Collins says he has gotten "incredible" support since revealing in Sports Illustrated that he is gay and thus becoming the first openly gay male athlete in one of the major team sports in this country. As that support includes congratulations from a current and former president and some of the biggest stars in his sport, perhaps that's even an understatement. What Mr. Collins has done is significant, of course, and he deserves all the good will and public support he can get. Pro basketball, baseball, football and hockey seem to be the last bastions of the "don't ask, don't tell" approach to the sexuality of their employees, if not outright hostility toward gays.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Almost three weeks after NBA player Jason Collins became the first openly gay active male athlete in a major American sport -- and yes, all those qualifiers are necessary -- new polling data shows a majority of Americans wouldn't care if their favorite athlete was gay. In a comprehensive survey conducted by Reason-Rupe, only 12 percent of those polled said they would be less likely to support their favorite jock if he or she came out, while 77...
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | March 25, 2001
ANAHEIM, Calif. - The University of Maryland didn't back its way into the NCAA Final Four last night. This was by far the Terps' best offensive show of the season, and center Lonny Baxter was the star. Behind Baxter's elbows, shoulders, deceiving foot speed and arm-ripping rebounds, Maryland bruised Stanford's inside game for an 87-73 victory in the West Regional final and advanced into the Final Four for the first time in school history. But this wasn't one of those play-just-well-enough-to-win victories that Maryland had achieved over George Mason and Georgetown in two of three previous tournament games.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell | March 22, 2001
Tonight's semifinal No. 1 Stanford (30-2) vs. No. 5 Cincinnati (25-9) Site: Arrowhead Pond, Anaheim, Calif. Time: 10:25 approximately. Conference records: Stanford won the Pacific-10 Conference with a 16-2 record. Cincinnati won the Conference USA regular-season title with an 11-5 record. Coaches: Mike Montgomery is 318-145 in 15 seasons at Stanford, and 472-222 in 23 seasons overall. Bob Huggins is 303-95 in 12 years at Cincinnati, 471-167 in 20 seasons overall. Stanford's lineup: G Mike McDonald (8.1 ppg, 4.8 apg, .515 3FG pct.)
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
This time, it played out in real life -- not on the pages of Sports Illustrated, but on the pitch. When openly-gay midfielder Robbie Rogers trotted onto the field for the LA Galaxy in this weekend's match against the Seattle Sounders, he made history "as the 1st openly gay athlete to play in American professional sports," as the Galaxy's official Twitter feed read. There is video: The teammate Rogers subs in for, Juninho, gives him double high-fives. Another teammate gives him a friendly slap as he runs into position.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Major League Baseball will announce Tuesday a new policy to protect players from discrimination and harassment based on sexual-orientation, according to a report from The Associated Press . Per MLB's new guidelines, which strengthen existing policies, the league will develop a workplace code of conduct, create a centralized system for reports of harassment and offer new training sessions to major league and minor league athletes. The league plans to announce its policy during Tuesday's All-Star Game festivities in New York.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
This time, it played out in real life -- not on the pages of Sports Illustrated, but on the pitch. When openly-gay midfielder Robbie Rogers trotted onto the field for the LA Galaxy in this weekend's match against the Seattle Sounders, he made history "as the 1st openly gay athlete to play in American professional sports," as the Galaxy's official Twitter feed read. There is video: The teammate Rogers subs in for, Juninho, gives him double high-fives. Another teammate gives him a friendly slap as he runs into position.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Almost three weeks after NBA player Jason Collins became the first openly gay active male athlete in a major American sport -- and yes, all those qualifiers are necessary -- new polling data shows a majority of Americans wouldn't care if their favorite athlete was gay. In a comprehensive survey conducted by Reason-Rupe, only 12 percent of those polled said they would be less likely to support their favorite jock if he or she came out, while 77...
NEWS
May 7, 2013
What does it say about our society when the sports and national news headlines as well as social media are all saturated with reports of a professional athlete's sexual orientation ("NBA player Jason Collins coming out is a defining moment in sports," April 29)? Who really cares? What kind of people care about someone's choice of partners? I don't understand why anyone chooses to tell the world that they prefer one sex over the other. That is a personal choice and only people with too much time on their hands or an unnatural desire to know about everyone else's private business will feel the need to know this information.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
NBA center Jason Collins says he has gotten "incredible" support since revealing in Sports Illustrated that he is gay and thus becoming the first openly gay male athlete in one of the major team sports in this country. As that support includes congratulations from a current and former president and some of the biggest stars in his sport, perhaps that's even an understatement. What Mr. Collins has done is significant, of course, and he deserves all the good will and public support he can get. Pro basketball, baseball, football and hockey seem to be the last bastions of the "don't ask, don't tell" approach to the sexuality of their employees, if not outright hostility toward gays.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | April 29, 2013
Maybe you yawned when you heard the news. Or maybe you just shrugged when you heard about Jason Collins and said: "What's the big deal?" But it's a very big deal. First active male player in a major team sport to declare he's gay? In the macho world of the NBA, where a player like Tim Hardaway once hissed "I hate gay people" before the ensuing backlash had him backpedaling like a fighter trying to avoid another haymaker? Oh, it's a very big deal. Now Collins, a 34-year-old journeyman center for six teams over 12 seasons, comes out of the closet and makes history.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - They came into MCI Center last night going in different directions, and did little to change that during the 48 minutes they played. The Washington Wizards continue to be one of the most surprising teams in the NBA, and the New Jersey Nets continue to be one of the most depressing. After spotting their visitors the first seven points, the Wizards took their first lead midway through the opening quarter, took control shortly before halftime, and took the Nets apart in the second half.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Jeff Barker | February 11, 2014
As a Maryland football player, Akil Patterson felt pangs of disappointment every time he typed the words "gay athlete" into an online search engine, hoping against hope to find someone else like him. Patterson reflected Monday on how different the culture has become since he came out in 2006 - after leaving Maryland. When he heard Missouri defensive end and NFL prospect Michael Sam announce Sunday night that he is gay, Patterson marveled at Sam's inner strength and at the support now available to gay athletes.
NEWS
July 11, 2005
Jason Aron Collins, an aviation technician first class in the Navy, died in a motorcycle accident July 3 in Sigonella, Sicily. He was 25. A native of Baltimore, Mr. Collins graduated from Mergenthaler High School in 1997. He immediately enlisted in the Navy and in five years had become a petty officer first class. He was the recipient of two Navy and Marine Corps achievement medals and earned his enlisted aviation warfare specialist pin while serving aboard the USS Carl Vinson. "He was just at the beginning of a long and important career," his commanding officer, Capt.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
WASHINGTON - They came into MCI Center last night going in different directions, and did little to change that during the 48 minutes they played. The Washington Wizards continue to be one of the most surprising teams in the NBA, and the New Jersey Nets continue to be one of the most depressing. After spotting their visitors the first seven points, the Wizards took their first lead midway through the opening quarter, took control shortly before halftime, and took the Nets apart in the second half.
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