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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 1996
See, I don't want a Jason Alexander movie.What I want is a George Costanza movie.Jason Alexander is a pleasant, if largely unremarkable, young actor, and to put him in the center of a movie is to mark it as pleasant, if largely unremarkable.George, the character Jason plays on "Seinfeld" if you've been on Mars, is one of the great icons of our age, a Leopold Bloom or Raskolnikov for the '90s, a greedy little acolyte of the cult of self whose mercenary desperation is always undercut by a tide of liar's phlegm rising in his throat, a congenital slipperiness of his eyes, and a sweat-drenched upper lip. He's all hat and no cattle.
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July 4, 2006
"What the Fourth of July should be is a celebration of American culture and our American history." Jason Alexander, who is hosting "A Capitol Fourth" in Washington today
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By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | January 14, 1996
In a classic "Seinfeld" episode, Jerry is congratulating George about something he's done, saying people will remember him for it. George panics. "I don't want to be remembered," he says without hesitation. "I want to be forgotten."Too late, George.The character, played for seven seasons by Jason Alexander, has become a cult figure in our pop culture, a symbol for our time, a monument to annoying, exasperating and grossly insecure people everywhere. He also is a beacon of hope for every bald, middle-aged single guy cruising the dating highways.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
Fairfax, Va. -- It's best not to cross The Junkies. The four guys who host a three-hour midday chat show on WJFK radio here are not what you would call vicious. Much of their banter, about sports, women and the youth they shared, is deliberately sophomoric. But any listener dumb enough to call in and challenge anything they've said on the air is instantly labeled a "doofus" and cut off with the noxious, conclusive sound of a flushing toilet. Such pleasantries - with attendant guffaws, taunts and jeers - will be part of the Baltimore area's mornings starting on Jan. 3, when The Junkies take over the slot on WHFS (under its new frequency, 105.7 FM)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 1998
It's Thursday night on the seventh floor of Hagerstown Hall dorm, and there's a party going on.Well, sort of a party.In the lounge, there are three giant bags of potato chips, two huge platters of chocolate chip cookies and a couple of cases of soft drinks. There are also 15 or so University of Maryland, College Park students in cutoffs, sweats, jeans and gym shorts eating, drinking and waiting for the start of "Seinfeld."Other dormies wander in and out. One woman dries her hair in preparation for a date that she says "will probably be totally Elainesque"; one guy slides in the door like Cosmo Kramer.
NEWS
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
Fairfax, Va. -- It's best not to cross The Junkies. The four guys who host a three-hour midday chat show on WJFK radio here are not what you would call vicious. Much of their banter, about sports, women and the youth they shared, is deliberately sophomoric. But any listener dumb enough to call in and challenge anything they've said on the air is instantly labeled a "doofus" and cut off with the noxious, conclusive sound of a flushing toilet. Such pleasantries - with attendant guffaws, taunts and jeers - will be part of the Baltimore area's mornings starting on Jan. 3, when The Junkies take over the slot on WHFS (under its new frequency, 105.7 FM)
FEATURES
July 4, 2006
"What the Fourth of July should be is a celebration of American culture and our American history." Jason Alexander, who is hosting "A Capitol Fourth" in Washington today
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 15, 1998
It was a based on a clever concept. But, in the end, the final episode of "Seinfeld" last night was mainly for die-hard fans. By no standard could you call it great.The concept involved putting Jerry, Elaine (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), George (Jason Alexander) and Kramer (Michael Richards) on trial for "criminal indifference," the very charge real-life critics of the series are making against the characters as "Seinfeld" ends its popular nine-year run.The finale started out promising enough, neatly resurrecting the fictional sitcom, "Jerry," that Jerry and George had created and tried to sell to NBC five years ago. A new NBC president, played by Peter Riegert, stumbles upon the pilot and offers them a contract for 13 episodes and the use of the company jet.The four decide to have a "fling in Paris" at NBC's expense before Jerry and George move to Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 14, 1993
Since I'm rooting for the Philadelphia Phillies, I hope the Atlanta Braves didn't win last night and force a seventh game in the National League playoffs tonight. If that's the case, that's the place to be in prime time tonight, beginning at 8 on CBS. Otherwise, there are these options, worthy and otherwise:* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Homer goes to college? Just for one course, and just for this one episode -- which was written by Conan O'Brien, before he left "The $H Simpsons" staff to become late-night TV talk-show host.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 16, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- "Seinfeld" will return for an eighth season next fall, NBC entertainment president Warren Littlefield said yesterday.The announcement came as somewhat of surprise since Jerry Seinfeld and other members of the cast were reportedly considering calling it quits after seven years in the Nielsen Top 10.As Littlefield spoke, Seinfeld walked on stage to field questions in a surprise press conference."
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | July 8, 2005
Tony Shalhoub has spent so much time in Monk's head that the obsessive-compulsive detective has gotten into the actor's head. "I never had a problem shaking hands," Shalhoub said. "Now I do." As the USA series enters its fourth season, it hasn't quite gotten to the stage where Shalhoub whips out a tissue to wipe his hands after shaking someone else's, Shalhoub said. "But I do have the ugly thoughts." Monk's ugly thoughts, a product of every conceivable phobia, make for some of the most beautifully unconventional detective work this side of Columbo.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 11, 2001
LOS ANGELES - Jeff Zucker has been NBC's new entertainment president for less than a month, but he's already faced with a serious threat to one of the network's most lucrative franchises: its dominance on Thursday nights, which stretches all the way back to "The Cosby Show" in the mid-1980s. Following its post-Super-Bowl launch Jan. 28, CBS will air "Survivor: The Australian Outback" Thursday nights at 8 p.m. opposite NBC's "Friends," the second-most popular series on television, and the linchpin of NBC's Thursday night dominance.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 15, 1998
It was a based on a clever concept. But, in the end, the final episode of "Seinfeld" last night was mainly for die-hard fans. By no standard could you call it great.The concept involved putting Jerry, Elaine (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), George (Jason Alexander) and Kramer (Michael Richards) on trial for "criminal indifference," the very charge real-life critics of the series are making against the characters as "Seinfeld" ends its popular nine-year run.The finale started out promising enough, neatly resurrecting the fictional sitcom, "Jerry," that Jerry and George had created and tried to sell to NBC five years ago. A new NBC president, played by Peter Riegert, stumbles upon the pilot and offers them a contract for 13 episodes and the use of the company jet.The four decide to have a "fling in Paris" at NBC's expense before Jerry and George move to Los Angeles.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 1998
It's Thursday night on the seventh floor of Hagerstown Hall dorm, and there's a party going on.Well, sort of a party.In the lounge, there are three giant bags of potato chips, two huge platters of chocolate chip cookies and a couple of cases of soft drinks. There are also 15 or so University of Maryland, College Park students in cutoffs, sweats, jeans and gym shorts eating, drinking and waiting for the start of "Seinfeld."Other dormies wander in and out. One woman dries her hair in preparation for a date that she says "will probably be totally Elainesque"; one guy slides in the door like Cosmo Kramer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 1, 1997
It cost $12 million to make, but Disney's production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella" would still be a deal at twice the price.On one of the most lavish and competitive sweeps nights in the history of television, this is the film tomorrow you do not want to miss.Stars? It's got a galaxy full. Whitney Houston as the godmother, Brandy Norwood as Cinderella, Bernadette Peters as the stepmother, Whoopi Goldberg as the queen and Jason Alexander in the newly created role of valet to the prince (Paolo Montalban)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 16, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- "Seinfeld" will return for an eighth season next fall, NBC entertainment president Warren Littlefield said yesterday.The announcement came as somewhat of surprise since Jerry Seinfeld and other members of the cast were reportedly considering calling it quits after seven years in the Nielsen Top 10.As Littlefield spoke, Seinfeld walked on stage to field questions in a surprise press conference."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 1, 1997
It cost $12 million to make, but Disney's production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella" would still be a deal at twice the price.On one of the most lavish and competitive sweeps nights in the history of television, this is the film tomorrow you do not want to miss.Stars? It's got a galaxy full. Whitney Houston as the godmother, Brandy Norwood as Cinderella, Bernadette Peters as the stepmother, Whoopi Goldberg as the queen and Jason Alexander in the newly created role of valet to the prince (Paolo Montalban)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 11, 2001
LOS ANGELES - Jeff Zucker has been NBC's new entertainment president for less than a month, but he's already faced with a serious threat to one of the network's most lucrative franchises: its dominance on Thursday nights, which stretches all the way back to "The Cosby Show" in the mid-1980s. Following its post-Super-Bowl launch Jan. 28, CBS will air "Survivor: The Australian Outback" Thursday nights at 8 p.m. opposite NBC's "Friends," the second-most popular series on television, and the linchpin of NBC's Thursday night dominance.
NEWS
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | January 14, 1996
In a classic "Seinfeld" episode, Jerry is congratulating George about something he's done, saying people will remember him for it. George panics. "I don't want to be remembered," he says without hesitation. "I want to be forgotten."Too late, George.The character, played for seven seasons by Jason Alexander, has become a cult figure in our pop culture, a symbol for our time, a monument to annoying, exasperating and grossly insecure people everywhere. He also is a beacon of hope for every bald, middle-aged single guy cruising the dating highways.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 1996
See, I don't want a Jason Alexander movie.What I want is a George Costanza movie.Jason Alexander is a pleasant, if largely unremarkable, young actor, and to put him in the center of a movie is to mark it as pleasant, if largely unremarkable.George, the character Jason plays on "Seinfeld" if you've been on Mars, is one of the great icons of our age, a Leopold Bloom or Raskolnikov for the '90s, a greedy little acolyte of the cult of self whose mercenary desperation is always undercut by a tide of liar's phlegm rising in his throat, a congenital slipperiness of his eyes, and a sweat-drenched upper lip. He's all hat and no cattle.
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