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Jasmine Rice

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NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | July 16, 2008
Scientists have discovered a variety of commonly consumed herbs and spices contain high amounts of health-promoting antioxidants that relieve inflammation and ward off heart disease and some types of cancer. The McCormick Web site is already busy getting the word out: One teaspoon of curry powder contains nearly the same amount of antioxidants as 1/2 cup of red grapes. This recipe for Curried Chicken With Jasmine Rice is a delicious way to add this blend of pungent spices to the American diet.
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NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | July 16, 2008
Scientists have discovered a variety of commonly consumed herbs and spices contain high amounts of health-promoting antioxidants that relieve inflammation and ward off heart disease and some types of cancer. The McCormick Web site is already busy getting the word out: One teaspoon of curry powder contains nearly the same amount of antioxidants as 1/2 cup of red grapes. This recipe for Curried Chicken With Jasmine Rice is a delicious way to add this blend of pungent spices to the American diet.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 10, 1999
Typically when planning the menu for a company dinner, I choose the main course first and then decide on the side dishes. Sometimes, however, when I have a special accompaniment in mind, I reverse this process. That's exactly what I did several days ago while deciding what to serve my son and his girlfriend for Sunday-night supper.Earlier in the week I had cooked long-grain jasmine rice in coconut milk and then stirred in some diced mangoes, grated lime zest, chopped pistachios and cilantro.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2004
There's a certain "proverb" about making chicken salad out of a particular chicken byproduct. You know the one. Well, you might say the folks at Club Charles and Zodiac have become mighty good "chicken salad makers" when it comes to any sort of bad rap that comes Baltimore's direction. "Each time the city gets negative press, we make a cocktail out of it," says Joy Martin, owner of the two North Charles Street hangouts. Right now, there are three new drinks hot off the press. In honor of Baltimore being named one of America's fattest burgs: the Fat City Cocktail, a "really decadent" concoction of Godiva liqueur, cream and vodka with chocolate sprinkles on top. Then, we have Charm City getting nailed recently for its polluting environs.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 28, 1997
Today's side dishes bring variety and spice to our meals. Of course, old standbys, such as plain baked potatoes and rice, are still appreciated, but with the profusion of new products available, intriguing, creative side dishes provide welcome variation.How about trying some of the different rices newly available on the market?I'm partial to fragrant jasmine rice. For confetti jasmine rice, simply steam it with flavorings, then add a bit of crunch and a bit of fun -- a perfect accompaniment to grilled fish or shellfish.
FEATURES
By Wendy Lin and Wendy Lin,Newsday | January 6, 1999
Blame it on sushi, refried beans and risotto, but America is becoming a rice-eating nation. Per-capita rice consumption in the United States has gone from 8.3 pounds in 1980 to 16 pounds in 1997.And the growth shows no signs of stopping.As immigrants from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean settle here, they create two markets for rice: one made up of the immigrants themselves and the other of the people who become seduced by the cuisines of China, Japan, Thailand, India and the islands - people who won't eat plain white rice once they've tried basmati and jasmine rice.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2000
Where to eat. What a dilemma. Chinese? (We do that all the time.) Indian? (David dislikes curry.) Look at this one, in the discount book -- Key West! Visions of palm trees and Parrot Heads, jugglers, clowns and musicians performing under a large, blood-orange sun. That's how we picked the Key West Bar & Grill, down a dark and winding road, through a Hanover industrial park to a Ramada Inn undergoing some heavy-lift remodeling. Key West? Right. Then the parking lot was a mystery, so jammed with cars that we had to walk a block to the entrance -- although most of the motel windows were dark and the bar and restaurant were rather empty.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1995
Finding star fruit, cilantro, coconut milk and hoisin sauce right there in the aisles of your neighborhood supermarket should be the tip-off: As they did with Italian food in the '70s and '80s, and Mexican food in the '80s and '90s, Americans are embracing a new ethnic cuisine with enthusiasm.The latest countries to make their presence felt on the culinary map are those of the western edge of the Pacific Ocean: Japan, China, Vietnam, Thailand.While consumers have happily dined on such Eastern staples as ketchup, noodles, iced tea and ginger ale for decades, a wider array of produce, and packaged, prepared and convenience foods from those four Asian countries is beginning to be common on grocery shelves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 23, 1999
Another lossNow that Haussner's is closing, everyone wants to eat there one last time. "We tried to go to Haussner's for lunch," one person told me, "but the line was part way down Eastern Avenue. In the rain!"But Haussner's isn't the only Baltimore institution we may be losing. Alfred Braznell, owner of Braznell's Caribbean Kitchen, says his restaurant is for sale. Located at 1623 E. Baltimore St., it was one of the first, if not the first, sit-down Caribbean restaurants in the city. Who knows?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2004
There's a certain "proverb" about making chicken salad out of a particular chicken byproduct. You know the one. Well, you might say the folks at Club Charles and Zodiac have become mighty good "chicken salad makers" when it comes to any sort of bad rap that comes Baltimore's direction. "Each time the city gets negative press, we make a cocktail out of it," says Joy Martin, owner of the two North Charles Street hangouts. Right now, there are three new drinks hot off the press. In honor of Baltimore being named one of America's fattest burgs: the Fat City Cocktail, a "really decadent" concoction of Godiva liqueur, cream and vodka with chocolate sprinkles on top. Then, we have Charm City getting nailed recently for its polluting environs.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 2000
Where to eat. What a dilemma. Chinese? (We do that all the time.) Indian? (David dislikes curry.) Look at this one, in the discount book -- Key West! Visions of palm trees and Parrot Heads, jugglers, clowns and musicians performing under a large, blood-orange sun. That's how we picked the Key West Bar & Grill, down a dark and winding road, through a Hanover industrial park to a Ramada Inn undergoing some heavy-lift remodeling. Key West? Right. Then the parking lot was a mystery, so jammed with cars that we had to walk a block to the entrance -- although most of the motel windows were dark and the bar and restaurant were rather empty.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 10, 1999
Typically when planning the menu for a company dinner, I choose the main course first and then decide on the side dishes. Sometimes, however, when I have a special accompaniment in mind, I reverse this process. That's exactly what I did several days ago while deciding what to serve my son and his girlfriend for Sunday-night supper.Earlier in the week I had cooked long-grain jasmine rice in coconut milk and then stirred in some diced mangoes, grated lime zest, chopped pistachios and cilantro.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 23, 1999
Another lossNow that Haussner's is closing, everyone wants to eat there one last time. "We tried to go to Haussner's for lunch," one person told me, "but the line was part way down Eastern Avenue. In the rain!"But Haussner's isn't the only Baltimore institution we may be losing. Alfred Braznell, owner of Braznell's Caribbean Kitchen, says his restaurant is for sale. Located at 1623 E. Baltimore St., it was one of the first, if not the first, sit-down Caribbean restaurants in the city. Who knows?
FEATURES
By Wendy Lin and Wendy Lin,Newsday | January 6, 1999
Blame it on sushi, refried beans and risotto, but America is becoming a rice-eating nation. Per-capita rice consumption in the United States has gone from 8.3 pounds in 1980 to 16 pounds in 1997.And the growth shows no signs of stopping.As immigrants from Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean settle here, they create two markets for rice: one made up of the immigrants themselves and the other of the people who become seduced by the cuisines of China, Japan, Thailand, India and the islands - people who won't eat plain white rice once they've tried basmati and jasmine rice.
FEATURES
By Kathy Casey and Kathy Casey,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | May 28, 1997
Today's side dishes bring variety and spice to our meals. Of course, old standbys, such as plain baked potatoes and rice, are still appreciated, but with the profusion of new products available, intriguing, creative side dishes provide welcome variation.How about trying some of the different rices newly available on the market?I'm partial to fragrant jasmine rice. For confetti jasmine rice, simply steam it with flavorings, then add a bit of crunch and a bit of fun -- a perfect accompaniment to grilled fish or shellfish.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lowe and Jennifer Lowe,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER Knight-Ridder Tribune | February 11, 1996
Rice has come a long way from the clumpy blobs dished up at cafeterias, the greasy grains eaten from takeout cartons.Today's rice, nutritious and versatile, carries exotic names: Jasmine. Basmati. Arborio. It fills kitchens with enticing aromas. It adds excitement to otherwise ho-hum meals.A good source of vitamin B, thiamine and niacin, rice is the fastest-growing food commodity in the nation, according to the USA Rice Council, and consumption continues to climb. Americans eat about 25 pounds of rice per person each year, the council says.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Lowe and Jennifer Lowe,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER Knight-Ridder Tribune | February 11, 1996
Rice has come a long way from the clumpy blobs dished up at cafeterias, the greasy grains eaten from takeout cartons.Today's rice, nutritious and versatile, carries exotic names: Jasmine. Basmati. Arborio. It fills kitchens with enticing aromas. It adds excitement to otherwise ho-hum meals.A good source of vitamin B, thiamine and niacin, rice is the fastest-growing food commodity in the nation, according to the USA Rice Council, and consumption continues to climb. Americans eat about 25 pounds of rice per person each year, the council says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2012
Tae Strain, the executive chef at Crush, is leaving the Belvedere Square restaurant. Saturday is Strain's last day at Crush, which will remain open. But Demi, his separate project on the lower level of Crush, will close after this Saturday's service.  Diners have four more chances to try Demi , which will be open for dinner Wednesday through Saturday night, and Strain has released the final-week menu. "It has been amazing and I leave with no regrets at all. " See: 10 Best New Restaurants of 2011 Earlier this month, patrons of Crush became concerned about its status, when it reverted to a BYOB policy, but the restaurant's owners have publicly committed to remaining open.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1995
Finding star fruit, cilantro, coconut milk and hoisin sauce right there in the aisles of your neighborhood supermarket should be the tip-off: As they did with Italian food in the '70s and '80s, and Mexican food in the '80s and '90s, Americans are embracing a new ethnic cuisine with enthusiasm.The latest countries to make their presence felt on the culinary map are those of the western edge of the Pacific Ocean: Japan, China, Vietnam, Thailand.While consumers have happily dined on such Eastern staples as ketchup, noodles, iced tea and ginger ale for decades, a wider array of produce, and packaged, prepared and convenience foods from those four Asian countries is beginning to be common on grocery shelves.
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