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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 8, 1995
Jascha Heifetz was almost universally acknowledged as the world's supreme classical instrumentalist -- an honor no other performer on any instrument, in his lifetime or since, has enjoyed. His reputation, unlike those achieved today when musicians try to become "personalities," was based solely on musical considerations."I wish you would keep it short," the violinist once told an interviewer. "Just make it 'Born in Russia, first lesson at 3, debut at 7, debut in America in 1917.' That's all there is really, about two lines."
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By Tim Smith | June 6, 2002
Heifetz Heifetz Rediscovered. Jascha Heifetz, violinist; various pianists. Recorded 1922-36. (RCA Victor 09026-63907) * * * * What treasures lurk in the vaults of record companies. The latest example comes from the RCA archives, where a good hour's worth of previously unreleased material featuring Jascha Heifetz, perhaps history's greatest violinist, has been uncovered and put on disc. Just for the sake of propriety, it must be noted that these recordings were never approved by Heifetz, who apparently felt they were not up to his super-human standards.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 18, 1992
Ronald Mutchnik knows he's no Jascha Heifetz.Mutchnik, who will play Saint-Saens' dazzling Introduction and Rondo for violin and orchestra tomorrow evening at Goucher College with the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, is talking about the famous Jascha Heifetz performance of the piece:"Such incredible ease and awesome stability," Mutchnik says. "He was so perfect that people listened for his mistakes just to see if there would be any. I don't think I'd ever want to be in his shoes, but then, I don't think I'll ever have to worry about it!"
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 8, 1995
Jascha Heifetz was almost universally acknowledged as the world's supreme classical instrumentalist -- an honor no other performer on any instrument, in his lifetime or since, has enjoyed. His reputation, unlike those achieved today when musicians try to become "personalities," was based solely on musical considerations."I wish you would keep it short," the violinist once told an interviewer. "Just make it 'Born in Russia, first lesson at 3, debut at 7, debut in America in 1917.' That's all there is really, about two lines."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 8, 1993
Sizzling is the word that best describes violinist Chee-Yun.The 22-year-old musician, who gave a recital last night at Goucher College with pianist Akira Eguchi, has an emotional range that goes from hot to hotter to hotter still, and that can threaten to reach the temperatures generated during a nuclear meltdown. She's also got all of the violin equipment in the world -- she's superior to Nadia Salerno-Sonnenberg and a match for Midori.I have never heard any fiddler dispatch Sarasate's "Introduction and Tarantella" with as much bravura.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | June 6, 2002
Heifetz Heifetz Rediscovered. Jascha Heifetz, violinist; various pianists. Recorded 1922-36. (RCA Victor 09026-63907) * * * * What treasures lurk in the vaults of record companies. The latest example comes from the RCA archives, where a good hour's worth of previously unreleased material featuring Jascha Heifetz, perhaps history's greatest violinist, has been uncovered and put on disc. Just for the sake of propriety, it must be noted that these recordings were never approved by Heifetz, who apparently felt they were not up to his super-human standards.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
John Pfeiffer, 75, who produced recordings by some of classical music's most famous artists, including Van Cliburn, Jascha Heifetz and Arturo Toscanini, in a 50-year career, died Thursday of a heart attack at his New York office.Affleck Gray, 89, a Scottish mountaineer, author and expert on the legendary Big Gray Man of Ben MacDhui, died Wednesday.The Rev. Frank C. Carr, 73, who gave up a publishing career to start a program for minority students, died Wednesday in Yuma, Ariz. Mr. Carr founded INROADS, a nonprofit college preparatory and career-development organization for minority students, in 1970.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 21, 1994
As the year draws to a close, the classical record industry is again adorned with long faces. It's been another dreadful year for classical sales, which is a pity because there were some fabulous recordings available. Anyone thinking about giving the gift of music this Christmas season should consider the following:* "The Heifetz Collection" (RCA/BMG 09026 61778-2): A 65-CD set, grouped in 46 volumes, that contains every commercial recording ever made by Jascha Heifetz, the greatest violinist who ever lived.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 18, 1991
Everyman Theatre presents comedy 'Hot L Baltimore'Lanford Wilson's "Hot L Baltimore," produced by the Everyman Theatre, opens a four-weekend run Friday at the Vagabond Players, 806 S. Broadway. Performance times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 15. Tickets are $10.A comedy about the eccentric clientele of a seedy Bawlamer hotel, "Hot L Baltimore" will be directed by Vincent Lancisi. This is the second production by Everyman, which made its debut last fall with "The Runner Stumbles."
SPORTS
September 25, 1990
They're playing our songChristian Holgard, an assistant football coach at North Dakota State, said that during his entire high school football career he never heard his school's fight song.The reason, Holgard said, was simple: His team never scored a touchdown.Holgard said: "I was always under the impression that our school song was 'The Star-Spangled Banner.'"Realism in televisionA group of National Football League players gathered at the Rose Bowl in June to film a soft-drink commercial.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 8, 1993
Sizzling is the word that best describes violinist Chee-Yun.The 22-year-old musician, who gave a recital last night at Goucher College with pianist Akira Eguchi, has an emotional range that goes from hot to hotter to hotter still, and that can threaten to reach the temperatures generated during a nuclear meltdown. She's also got all of the violin equipment in the world -- she's superior to Nadia Salerno-Sonnenberg and a match for Midori.I have never heard any fiddler dispatch Sarasate's "Introduction and Tarantella" with as much bravura.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 18, 1992
Ronald Mutchnik knows he's no Jascha Heifetz.Mutchnik, who will play Saint-Saens' dazzling Introduction and Rondo for violin and orchestra tomorrow evening at Goucher College with the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, is talking about the famous Jascha Heifetz performance of the piece:"Such incredible ease and awesome stability," Mutchnik says. "He was so perfect that people listened for his mistakes just to see if there would be any. I don't think I'd ever want to be in his shoes, but then, I don't think I'll ever have to worry about it!"
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | March 28, 2009
This was supposed to be the week that Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director emeritus Yuri Temirkanov returned to conduct after an absence of several seasons, but he canceled all U.S. engagements this month and next, leaving a lot of disappointed fans. Temirkanov's place is being taken here by Yan Pascal Tortelier, one of the orchestra's frequent and best guest conductors. He kept the original program of Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5 and Brahms' Violin Concerto, the latter with the original soloist, Vadim Repin.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1998
Before a packed house, violinist Joshua Bell ended Shriver Hall's concert series Sunday with a recital that walked in the footsteps of the great fiddlers.Violin recitals do that because most of the standard repertory was created for the gifts of specific players. Bell played a little sonata by Mozart; the sonata Cesar Franck wrote for fellow Belgian Eugene Ysaye; the first of the sonatas Brahms wrote for Joseph Joachim; and the flashy "Zigeunerweisen" ("Gypsy Airs") written by the Spanish violinist Pablo de Sarasate for himself.
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