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NEWS
By TOM BAXTER | April 14, 1993
Atlanta -- Language update: It is no longer hip to refer to taxpayers as ''taxpayers.'' Now they're ''customers.'' Government provides its customers with ''services,'' and what it has lacked up to now is a system of ''quality management.''No one has as yet suggested that an IRS auditor be referred to as a customer service representative, but you get the drift.This new jargon was much in evidence last week when Vice President Al Gore met with a hundred or so Atlanta-based federal workers for a town-meeting-style session on government waste and inefficiency.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Allow me to roll the apple of discord into the assembly.  For the purposes of discussion, is it to our advantage as journalists to write in a language that we do not share with readers? (If you were not aware that we do this, pray read on.)  Every trade has its jargon and conventions, and practitioners prove themselves adept by mastering it. Journalism is not an exception. We write with conventions that are peculiar to newspapers, and many of them survive in online journalism.  For example, though we no longer refer to legislators as solons , we continue to use such headlinese as  eye  (v.)
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BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,Marketwatch | July 17, 2007
In the words of my youngest daughter, it was "ginormous" news when the wordsmiths at Merriam-Webster announced this month they would add one of her favorite words to its collegiate dictionary. "Ginormous" combines gigantic and enormous, and it's tough to tell from my daughter's use of it exactly what qualifies. It can be applied to the stuffed animal grand prize in some contest booth at the county fair, or the bruise she got during a game she played last weekend, or to a just-bigger-than-normal piece of pie. But no matter how it's applied, it's clear that she and her friends certainly know what "ginormous" means.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: CANT The earliest sense of the protean word cant that the Oxford English Dictionary records is from the seventeenth century: "the whining speech of beggars. " But it was in the eighteenth century that the word dropped the training wheels and really got moving.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | May 11, 2008
Are you confused when your broker says your stock is headed for "bagel land?" Not sure whether to worry that your bank loaded up on "CDOs-Squared?" Do you fall into a trance after reading the first paragraph of a mutual fund prospectus? It's not just you. The financial world is filled with jargon that even some financial professionals admit they don't always understand. Some sales people use complex terms as a way to impress customers. The consequences of this are serious. We carry more of the burden today of managing our own money so it lasts our lifetime, and jargon intimidates or keeps some of us from investing while causing others to jump into the wrong investments.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
When Sandra Mitchel arrived at the Whole Life Expo at the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday, she made her way to the Vogel Photonic Triangulation Unit: a massage table surrounded by crystals and colored lights and connected to a tripod busy with wires and a green cube covered with knobs and meters.A graphic artist for the Navy, the Arlington, Va., resident took off her shoes, stretched out on her back, closed her eyes and turned up her palms.A sign read: "Quiet please. Sacred space."When the table was turned on, waves of energy passed from the cube to crystals connected to colored lights aimed at chakra points along Mitchel's body, according to body worker Kate Shawgo.
NEWS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1996
Too bad the great American poet Dr. Seuss didn't live to see the Big Bang of cyberspace, with the Internet going from geek retreat to nationwide playground in just a few years. The creator of the lorax, the sneedle and the wumpus would be at home with the gigabyte, Unix, Spam, RAM and ROM.The world of computers has long been full of elaborate and arcane jargon, seemingly designed to separate the newbie -- novice -- from the pro. But the soaring popularity of the Net has spread that jargon far and wide, and it seems like you can't open a package of gum without seeing something like http: //bubbles.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Staff | July 4, 2004
Like many fields, finance has its own language. Words and phrases become shorthand for complex concepts. New words are created each business cycle, while old jargon can take on new meanings. Terms can be as dry as, well, convertible subordinated debentures. Others are colorful, borrowing from literature and pop culture. A Wall Street broker recently e-mailed online financial dictionary Investopedia.com with a question: "What's a Bo Derek?" He wasn't referring to the actress who played Dudley Moore's vision of the ideal woman in the 1979 movie 10. He meant a Wall Street term for the perfect stock.
NEWS
December 14, 2005
Numbers-- Claims for unemployment benefits increased by 6,000 last week to 327,000, a figure seen as indicating a healthy labor market, the U.S. reported. TIP OF THE WEEK Writing is more than putting words on a page. It is using words that make sense (no jargon or pretentious prose), that express an idea in the clearest possible way (proper grammar, good sentence structure). Never forget your reader. Whether you are writing a letter, a proposal, a brief or an e-mail, you and your company will be judged by your writing.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: CANT The earliest sense of the protean word cant that the Oxford English Dictionary records is from the seventeenth century: "the whining speech of beggars. " But it was in the eighteenth century that the word dropped the training wheels and really got moving.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Had you been sitting near me at the paragraph factory yesterday evening, you might have noticed a clenching of the jaw, a narrowing of the eyes, and a pursing of the lips as I came across the construction "7,000 youth. " A quick look this morning at the Corpus of Contemporary American English confirms my suspicion that I have identified another instance of bureaucratic language bleeding into general usage.* The CCAE shows multiple examples of youth in the sense of youths , individual young people, in professional medical and educational publications, fewer frequencies in general publications.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | July 27, 2008
Some of the grand jurors investigating allegations of misconduct by Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon have grown tired of the probe and its near-daily media coverage, one grand juror told a Sun reporter last month. The exchange provoked a cringe: grand jurors - or any jurors - are not supposed to expose themselves to news accounts of the cases they are assigned. And it raises a question that goes to the heart of the integrity of the criminal justice system: are jurors routinely violating their oath not to research cases - at home on their computers, in the jury deliberation room on the iPhones, by glancing at news reports - on their own?
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | May 11, 2008
Are you confused when your broker says your stock is headed for "bagel land?" Not sure whether to worry that your bank loaded up on "CDOs-Squared?" Do you fall into a trance after reading the first paragraph of a mutual fund prospectus? It's not just you. The financial world is filled with jargon that even some financial professionals admit they don't always understand. Some sales people use complex terms as a way to impress customers. The consequences of this are serious. We carry more of the burden today of managing our own money so it lasts our lifetime, and jargon intimidates or keeps some of us from investing while causing others to jump into the wrong investments.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | March 14, 2008
Brady Daniller can speed read -- or spread, as it is called in debate jargon -- with the best of them. The Wilde Lake High School sophomore said he capitalizes on his ability to talk fast to cram all of his ideas into six minutes of allotted speaking time. But one of the judges at Saturday's debate competition at Loyola Blakefield in Towson said there is often an accompanying strategy behind that technique. "Spreading allows you to run your arguments rapidly past your opponent, so he or she has a difficult time absorbing them all," said Teresa Needer, a math teacher at Towson High.
BUSINESS
By Charles Jaffe and Charles Jaffe,Marketwatch | July 17, 2007
In the words of my youngest daughter, it was "ginormous" news when the wordsmiths at Merriam-Webster announced this month they would add one of her favorite words to its collegiate dictionary. "Ginormous" combines gigantic and enormous, and it's tough to tell from my daughter's use of it exactly what qualifies. It can be applied to the stuffed animal grand prize in some contest booth at the county fair, or the bruise she got during a game she played last weekend, or to a just-bigger-than-normal piece of pie. But no matter how it's applied, it's clear that she and her friends certainly know what "ginormous" means.
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | April 29, 2007
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA There's something about this place. Maybe it's the tango. Those of you who have witnessed the real thing know tango -- when done right -- is not a dance for sissies. It is aggressive, moody, seductive, sometimes beautiful and maybe a little dangerous. Like Buenos Aires. So ... is it a cliche to compare Buenos Aires to the tango? Maybe, but it was either that or Evita. Which brings me to the subject of steakhouses -- but first, the obligatory travel story transition paragraphs: Cool place to visit, Buenos Aires.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Had you been sitting near me at the paragraph factory yesterday evening, you might have noticed a clenching of the jaw, a narrowing of the eyes, and a pursing of the lips as I came across the construction "7,000 youth. " A quick look this morning at the Corpus of Contemporary American English confirms my suspicion that I have identified another instance of bureaucratic language bleeding into general usage.* The CCAE shows multiple examples of youth in the sense of youths , individual young people, in professional medical and educational publications, fewer frequencies in general publications.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
Once again, people are telling school officials to cut out the jargon.A group of business people told school administrators Friday that the list of "exit outcomes" they are presenting to the public would get a much better reception if the list were written in plain language.Parents have been saying much the same thing at meetings held especially for them by the Carroll Council of PTAs."You must explain what you mean in the language," said Pat Donoho, manager of compensation and benefits at Random House.
TRAVEL
By JANE ENGLE and JANE ENGLE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 2006
Chris Williams appreciates plush surroundings. In December, he and his wife, Alice, stayed in a $350-a-night Ritz-Carlton in Florida. "Marble everything," he said. But last month, the couple from Rome, Ga., decided on the Holiday Inn Express Hollywood, where room rates recently ran as little as $104 per night, for their five-day getaway to Los Angeles. "It's nice to live in luxury," said Williams, who supervises technicians at a cable TV company. "But it's not feasible." Millions of frugal travelers agree.
NEWS
December 14, 2005
Numbers-- Claims for unemployment benefits increased by 6,000 last week to 327,000, a figure seen as indicating a healthy labor market, the U.S. reported. TIP OF THE WEEK Writing is more than putting words on a page. It is using words that make sense (no jargon or pretentious prose), that express an idea in the clearest possible way (proper grammar, good sentence structure). Never forget your reader. Whether you are writing a letter, a proposal, a brief or an e-mail, you and your company will be judged by your writing.
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