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By Heather Rogers Haverback | March 26, 2011
When I heard that another earthquake had rocked the land near where I had lived and taught in Japan, my heart sank. I could not help but think of all of my kind colleagues, students and friends in that small village. While I am now removed from that portion of the world and that part of my life, my appreciation of the Japanese and their ways remains at my core. Throughout my year of living in a Japanese village on the coast of Toyama, I was referred to daily as a gaijin , or alien.
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NEWS
By Heather Rogers Haverback | March 26, 2011
When I heard that another earthquake had rocked the land near where I had lived and taught in Japan, my heart sank. I could not help but think of all of my kind colleagues, students and friends in that small village. While I am now removed from that portion of the world and that part of my life, my appreciation of the Japanese and their ways remains at my core. Throughout my year of living in a Japanese village on the coast of Toyama, I was referred to daily as a gaijin , or alien.
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NEWS
By Wakako Hironaka | June 16, 1993
SOMEONE recently said to me: "There is something wrong with Japanese society. Children study too much; university students play too much; wage earners work too much; and retired persons have too much leisure. Everything in excess."Although Japanese society may look rosy -- we have peace, low unemployment and low crime -- there is definitely a lack of balance.Japanese people want change. However, no one seems to know in which direction to turn; all we know is that we are dissatisfied.People most frequently and vocally express their disenchantment with politics, but I suspect this may only be an easy target for our resentment, behind which lurks an even more profound and widespread dissatisfaction with the way we have been living our lives.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2004
TOKYO - Japanese children swinging at the batting cages pretend they're him, the news photographers at the ballpark act as if there's no one here besides him, and when the newspaper headlines scream his nickname, "Godzilla," the exclamation marks are taken for granted. That's the public story of New York Yankee Hideki Matsui's triumphant homecoming, Japan's most beloved baseball slugger returning to a unified display of adulation from a proud nation. He came back for major-league baseball's regular-season opener here tomorrow night, and for an exhibition yesterday against his old team, Tokyo's Yomiuri Giants.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 5, 1995
Cambridge, Massachusetts -- The ''globalization'' of national economies, so enthusiastically promoted by American government and business today, as during the past decade, amounts to an ideological form of Western imperialism, to which the rest of the world is compelled to react. It now is meeting significant opposition, increasingly expressed in political as well as economic terms.The pattern is familiar. The center of Western power -- the U.S. today, Britain yesterday, Spain before that -- attempts to impose upon others its own vision of how the world should be ordered.
FEATURES
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | December 27, 1990
TokyoThe world's greatest economic powerhouse is staffed by some of the world's weakest men.From that simple but stark assumption, Japan's movie-directing sensation of the 1980s has fashioned "Ageman," the film he hopes will carry his momentum into the 1990s."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 29, 2004
TOKYO - Japanese children swinging at the batting cages pretend they're him, the news photographers at the ballpark act as if there's no one here besides him, and when the newspaper headlines scream his nickname, "Godzilla," the exclamation marks are taken for granted. That's the public story of New York Yankee Hideki Matsui's triumphant homecoming, Japan's most beloved baseball slugger returning to a unified display of adulation from a proud nation. He came back for major-league baseball's regular-season opener here tomorrow night, and for an exhibition yesterday against his old team, Tokyo's Yomiuri Giants.
NEWS
By SARAH WEINMAN and SARAH WEINMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2006
Nightlife Thomas Perry Crossfire Miyuki Miyabe Vertical / 300 pages / $25 One of the most exciting developments in crime fiction is the increasing availability of Japanese authors (such as the Edgar-nominated Natsuo Kirino and best-seller Koji Suzuki) to our borders. But the best export might well be Miyuki Miyabe, who serves up a stunner of a book in Crossfire. Superficially, there's some resemblance to Stephen King's Firestarter (the main protagonist, Junko Aoki, has the power to start fires using her mind)
NEWS
October 17, 2002
GEN. DOUGLAS MacArthur oversaw the postwar occupation of Japan from the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo. An ideal spot, in the heart of the city, overlooking the Imperial Palace. The proximity to the palace proved fortuitous to the general's mission, for his success in reforming Japan after its surrender in 1945 could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the reigning emperor, Hirohito. General MacArthur recognized the cultural and historical significance of the emperor in Japanese society.
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen and Howard Henry Chen,Sun Staff Writer | October 17, 1994
"Choco Bon-Bon is five feet eight inches tall, weighs one hundred twenty-eight pounds, . . . " begins the fourth chapter of a just-published book about Japan. "He was born on May 4, 1967 -- or Showa 42 by the Japanese calendar."Mr. Bon-Bon, explains author Karl Taro Greenfeld, is the most sought-after male lead in the Japanese adult film video industry -- an industry that rivals microchips, compact cars and sushi in some segments of Japanese society.Another chapter in Mr. Greenfeld's book follows young Japanese women wearing plastic wrap dresses to Tokyo's discos, where males pay to ogle them.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | June 5, 1995
Cambridge, Massachusetts -- The ''globalization'' of national economies, so enthusiastically promoted by American government and business today, as during the past decade, amounts to an ideological form of Western imperialism, to which the rest of the world is compelled to react. It now is meeting significant opposition, increasingly expressed in political as well as economic terms.The pattern is familiar. The center of Western power -- the U.S. today, Britain yesterday, Spain before that -- attempts to impose upon others its own vision of how the world should be ordered.
NEWS
By Wakako Hironaka | June 16, 1993
SOMEONE recently said to me: "There is something wrong with Japanese society. Children study too much; university students play too much; wage earners work too much; and retired persons have too much leisure. Everything in excess."Although Japanese society may look rosy -- we have peace, low unemployment and low crime -- there is definitely a lack of balance.Japanese people want change. However, no one seems to know in which direction to turn; all we know is that we are dissatisfied.People most frequently and vocally express their disenchantment with politics, but I suspect this may only be an easy target for our resentment, behind which lurks an even more profound and widespread dissatisfaction with the way we have been living our lives.
FEATURES
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | December 27, 1990
TokyoThe world's greatest economic powerhouse is staffed by some of the world's weakest men.From that simple but stark assumption, Japan's movie-directing sensation of the 1980s has fashioned "Ageman," the film he hopes will carry his momentum into the 1990s."
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Evening Sun Staff | August 15, 1991
The Arita family, who lives in Saki City, Osaka, says many Japanese have little sensitivity when it comes to racial issues.So the Aritas formed a group to combat racism. Yesterday, the family visited Baltimore at the invitation of black-owned companies promoting business ties between black American and Japanese firms.The family operates the Association to Stop Racism Against Blacks in Japan. Founded in 1988, the organization has fought to remove from Japanese society products demeaning to blacks -- such as black dolls with exaggerated facial features and Little Black Sambo toys.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | October 21, 1992
Kimiko Arita, a 57-year-old woman from Kanagawa, Japan, and Euclin Mapp, a senior volunteer from Annapolis, found they had a little more in common than they originally thought.Mrs. Arita, who stayed with Mrs. Mapp while touring Maryland to learn about senior volunteerism, is married to a graduate of the Japanese Naval Academy. Mrs. Mapp's son-in-law graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy.The tiny coincidence made her visit even more enjoyable, she said."I enjoyed the stay very much," said Ms. Arita, "We became friends and I would very much like to do it again."
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