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NEWS
June 8, 1995
The Japanese people breathe easier now that Shoko Asahara and six of his disciples are locked up and charged with murder in the March 20 gas attack that killed 12 people and sickened 5,500 on the Tokyo subway. Another nine disciples are charged with manufacturing deadly sarin gas that would have been used in subsequent attacks.Society must protect itself. It must establish the certitude that calling your association a religion does not license you to harm people or to break laws that are binding on others.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2011
Thinking backon his efforts as an ambassador of baseball, Cal Ripken Jr. recalled howthe teens he worked with in Nicaragua were so excited it was impossible to corral them into groups, while the kids in China were so reserved it was hard to get them out on their own. But one of the things both sets of young players shared, he said Tuesday, was a love of the game. That's part of the reason why the Hall of Fame shortstop isn't intimidated by his latest diplomatic assignment from the U.S. Department of State: Hosting 16 teenagers from Japan who were profoundly affected by the earthquake and tsunami in March.
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FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 17, 1995
From The Sun Sept. 17-23, 1845Sept. 20: The females engaged in the various cotton factories at Pittsburgh and Alleghany City, have all struck, on account of a refusal by the manufacturers to consider ten hours a day's work.Sept. 23: Catherine Rantz and Mary Newman, for throwing stones in the street, were arrested by Officer O'Donnell and taken before Justice McAllister,, who fined them each $1 and costs.From The Sun Sept. 17-23, 1895Sept. 17: Warden Nelson, of the county jail, is confined to his bed, suffering from injuries received by a fall in jumping from a York Road car.Sept.
NEWS
March 25, 2011
Like millions of Americans I have watched with amazement how calmly and stoically the Japanese people have reacted to their triple catastrophe of earthquake, tsunami and radiation releases from crippled nuclear plants. I believe that their reaction can be explained if one refers to the Hagakure, also known as the Book of the Samurai, which still forms the basis for many cultural beliefs even in modern Japan. Consider in Chapter Eleven, words written in the 18th century by Tsunetomo Yamamoto: "Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily.
NEWS
March 25, 2011
Like millions of Americans I have watched with amazement how calmly and stoically the Japanese people have reacted to their triple catastrophe of earthquake, tsunami and radiation releases from crippled nuclear plants. I believe that their reaction can be explained if one refers to the Hagakure, also known as the Book of the Samurai, which still forms the basis for many cultural beliefs even in modern Japan. Consider in Chapter Eleven, words written in the 18th century by Tsunetomo Yamamoto: "Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
Celera Genomics Group said yesterday that it will acquire a stake in HuBit Genomix Inc., a young Japanese company dedicated to identifying genetic variations associated with disease. Financial terms of the investment were not disclosed. Celera will have a stake of a little less than a third in HuBit, making it the second-largest shareholder in the company formed about a year ago. Rockville-based Celera already claims the world's largest database of genetic variations among individuals; it has more than 4 million.
NEWS
October 9, 1991
The disconnect between Japan's citizens and the party bosses in seemingly permanent control of the national government is illustrated once again in the downfall of Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu.According to the latest opinion polls, Mr. Kaifu's popularity stands at a near-record 56.7 percent and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which he had rescued from a humiliating 1989 setback, is drawing 64.8 percent support -- the highest in its 38 unbroken years in power.Such figures, however, did not deter the self-perpetuating factions that dominate the LDP and parliament from deciding they no longer needed Mr. Kaifu.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 27, 1992
TOKYO -- Though Apple Computer Inc. owns less than 10 percent of the Japanese personal-computer market, the Macintosh seems to be everywhere here: a prop on a weekly television show and on quiz shows, on T-shirts and on the desks of yuppie business people.In fact, the Macintosh may have more cachet in Japan than in the United States because of the way it fits with how Japanese work and -- some say -- simply because it appeals to the California-loving Japanese.But in a country that is a tough sell for U.S. high-tech companies and is dominated by NEC Corp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2003
NIIGATA, Japan - Citing safety violations, Japan detained in the port here yesterday the lone ship that ferries passengers between Japan and North Korea, two countries at loggerheads over Pyongyang's nuclear program. As a sailor on the top deck triumphantly waved North Korea's red star banner and waitresses led rousing choruses of the "Song of Comrade Gen. Kim Il Sung," the white-hulled vessel docked here for the first time since January, when it was met by angry protesters. Protesters were out in force, demanding an end to North Korea's nuclear weapons program and a full accounting for up to 100 Japanese believed to have been abducted to North Korea in the 1970s and 1980s.
FEATURES
By SUSAN HIPSLEY and SUSAN HIPSLEY,Special to The Sun | June 25, 1995
"Oh, he's a Type A," someone might say, using what has become a bit of pop-psychology shorthand for describing someone who works -- and plays -- relentlessly and feels a constant time urgency.Since 1959, when Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman reported that men with those characteristics were seven times more likely than others to have heart disease and twice as likely to have heart attacks, most lay people have linked those competitive, hostile behaviors to coronary disease.But as the scientific study games go, the ball has been thrown quietly and slowly into another court of opinion.
NEWS
By J.T. Cassidy | March 22, 2011
—When the massive, magnitude-9.0 earthquake that shook Japan to its core hit my neighborhood of Yokohama, 250 miles south of the epicenter, it registered an upper 5 on the shindo scale. Shindo, literally meaning "degree of shaking," is the official seismic intensity scale used in Japan. Ranging from 0 to 7, it factors in a host of tangibles and intangibles — including the sense of fear — as well as more easily observable physical phenomena like falling dishes, cracking walls and toppling structures.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2003
NIIGATA, Japan - Citing safety violations, Japan detained in the port here yesterday the lone ship that ferries passengers between Japan and North Korea, two countries at loggerheads over Pyongyang's nuclear program. As a sailor on the top deck triumphantly waved North Korea's red star banner and waitresses led rousing choruses of the "Song of Comrade Gen. Kim Il Sung," the white-hulled vessel docked here for the first time since January, when it was met by angry protesters. Protesters were out in force, demanding an end to North Korea's nuclear weapons program and a full accounting for up to 100 Japanese believed to have been abducted to North Korea in the 1970s and 1980s.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2001
Celera Genomics Group said yesterday that it will acquire a stake in HuBit Genomix Inc., a young Japanese company dedicated to identifying genetic variations associated with disease. Financial terms of the investment were not disclosed. Celera will have a stake of a little less than a third in HuBit, making it the second-largest shareholder in the company formed about a year ago. Rockville-based Celera already claims the world's largest database of genetic variations among individuals; it has more than 4 million.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 15, 2000
YOKOHAMA, Japan - Taking the blame for the boss is only a small part of the growing phenomenon of suicide in Japan. White-collar workers, schoolchildren, housewives and scores of desperate heads of households are caught up in the epidemic. Federal police documented 32,862 suicides last year, up 35 percent from the previous 12 months. The Health Ministry recorded 2,065 juvenile suicides, a 45 percent increase. Yasuhara Abe, 63, was the vice president of Sogo Co., one of Japan's largest department store chains, and a corporate executive with an old-school code of honor.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | September 17, 1995
From The Sun Sept. 17-23, 1845Sept. 20: The females engaged in the various cotton factories at Pittsburgh and Alleghany City, have all struck, on account of a refusal by the manufacturers to consider ten hours a day's work.Sept. 23: Catherine Rantz and Mary Newman, for throwing stones in the street, were arrested by Officer O'Donnell and taken before Justice McAllister,, who fined them each $1 and costs.From The Sun Sept. 17-23, 1895Sept. 17: Warden Nelson, of the county jail, is confined to his bed, suffering from injuries received by a fall in jumping from a York Road car.Sept.
FEATURES
By SUSAN HIPSLEY and SUSAN HIPSLEY,Special to The Sun | June 25, 1995
"Oh, he's a Type A," someone might say, using what has become a bit of pop-psychology shorthand for describing someone who works -- and plays -- relentlessly and feels a constant time urgency.Since 1959, when Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman reported that men with those characteristics were seven times more likely than others to have heart disease and twice as likely to have heart attacks, most lay people have linked those competitive, hostile behaviors to coronary disease.But as the scientific study games go, the ball has been thrown quietly and slowly into another court of opinion.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | March 29, 1994
TOKYO -- Once again the United States topped the news in Japan, and once again the reason was the shooting of youths who loved America, only to be killed.Two teen-agers -- one Japanese, the other a Japanese-American -- studying in California died Sunday night, two days after they were critically wounded by a carjacker.There were morbid lessons for the Japanese to learn about U.S. perspectives on mortality. Although the two were alive by Japanese standards because of the tick of their hearts, they were pronounced dead -- brain dead -- under U.S. standards.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 11, 1990
Sitting on the studio floor, the sculpture's head alone is taller than and several times as wide as Yasuhiko Hashimoto, the Japanese sculptor standing beside it. And, while Mr. Hashimoto is so soft-spoken it's sometimes hard to hear him with the other sculptors chopping away in the background, the head looks as if, were it to speak, it would at least growl and probably roar.Fudo Myoh-oh is a fierce looking Buddhist god. Don't be afraid -- he's on our side against the demons -- but he's probably going to look even fiercer next Sunday, with his head attached to his body and the whole sculpture raised upright for the first time to its full height of 33 feet.
NEWS
June 8, 1995
The Japanese people breathe easier now that Shoko Asahara and six of his disciples are locked up and charged with murder in the March 20 gas attack that killed 12 people and sickened 5,500 on the Tokyo subway. Another nine disciples are charged with manufacturing deadly sarin gas that would have been used in subsequent attacks.Society must protect itself. It must establish the certitude that calling your association a religion does not license you to harm people or to break laws that are binding on others.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | March 29, 1994
TOKYO -- Once again the United States topped the news in Japan, and once again the reason was the shooting of youths who loved America, only to be killed.Two teen-agers -- one Japanese, the other a Japanese-American -- studying in California died Sunday night, two days after they were critically wounded by a carjacker.There were morbid lessons for the Japanese to learn about U.S. perspectives on mortality. Although the two were alive by Japanese standards because of the tick of their hearts, they were pronounced dead -- brain dead -- under U.S. standards.
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