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By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
Chomp! Chomp! Rustle, rustle. Can you hear it? The imperceptible sound of tiny, steely mandibles in an annual orgy of destruction? It is Japanese beetle time again.It's not just your imagination either, if they seem to be worse than ever this year. Last year's extra-wet summer made it easy for the females to lay their eggs in the moist, softened soil, and the mild winter virtually ensured that nearly every egg laid is now hatching into a fully fledged Japanese beetle.Many plants attackedRegarded by most gardeners with a well-deserved mixture of horror and extreme aggravation, these beetles have long been the plague of roses and other beloved flowers from dahlias to digitalis (unfortunately, it doesn't seem to poison them)
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 27, 2014
I was prepping the garden for my daughter's engagement party when it hit me. (We really like the guy, thanks for asking.) I was inviting these strangers into the garden, but I was about to kick all the residents out. The bugs, I mean. I was all set to open up a pair of industrial-size foggers containing insect repellent and blast to death everything that flew or crawled. And all for the comfort of my human guests. But I couldn't do it. I couldn't pull the trigger. Let everybody scratch, I decided.
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NEWS
By Mary Gold | August 25, 1991
Experienced Howard County gardeners gloomily shook their heads last spring: the mild winter meant lots of summer bugs. The soon-to-appearhordes of flea beetles, aphids and Japanese beetles were a foregone conclusion. The smart gardener prepared for the fray.Like many weather-related adages, the warning seems to straddle the line between science and folklore. And like many such sayings, its validity, like beauty, may depend on the beholder.Sometimes we see what we think we ought to see. Sure, there have been zillions of insects this summer, but have their numbers been greater than normal?
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | September 1, 2011
Fifteen years ago, I planted some "Liriopes" next to several daffodils. In fact, I went out of my way to do it. Why? I just couldn't resist putting these plants in close proximity to each other because legend has it that Liriope is the mother of "Narcissus" (daffodil). According to Greek mythology, Liriope was a river goddess, and her son, Narcissus, was changed into the first daffodil by Nemesis, the goddess of retribution, as a punishment for Narcissus breaking the heart of Echo, a woodland goddess who was Nemesis' good friend.
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By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | July 14, 2011
Two decades ago, I planted several frost-tender gladiolus "corms" (tiny bulbs). Then, to my surprise, instead of the bulbs freezing and perishing during winter, they sprouted and bloomed the following spring. They've sprouted and bloomed every summer since. Why? The corms were planted against a south-facing wall. There, evidently, the ground doesn't freeze deep enough to kill them. In any case, as our gladioluses begin to bloom this season in shades of red, yellow, orange and white, I'm noticing colors that I hadn't anticipated.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetis hippodromehatter@aol.com | July 21, 2011
Two decades ago, I planted several frost-tender gladiolus corms (tiny bulbs). Then, to my surprise, instead of the bulbs freezing and perishing during winter, they sprouted and bloomed the following spring. They've sprouted and bloomed every summer since. Why? The corms were planted against a south-facing wall. There, evidently, the ground doesn't freeze deep enough to kill them. In any case, as our gladioli begin to bloom this season in shades of red, yellow, orange and white, I'm noticing colors that I hadn't anticipated.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | September 1, 2011
Fifteen years ago, I planted some "Liriopes" next to several daffodils. In fact, I went out of my way to do it. Why? I just couldn't resist putting these plants in close proximity to each other because legend has it that Liriope is the mother of "Narcissus" (daffodil). According to Greek mythology, Liriope was a river goddess, and her son, Narcissus, was changed into the first daffodil by Nemesis, the goddess of retribution, as a punishment for Narcissus breaking the heart of Echo, a woodland goddess who was Nemesis' good friend.
FEATURES
July 21, 1996
My purple-leaf plum tree is swarming with Japanese beetles. My neighbors have a beetle trap, but I have the beetles. Should I get one, too?No! The attractant in the traps is a powerful sex hormone, luring adult beetles from miles around to your area. On the way to the traps, the beetles are eating the leaves on your tree.Suggest to your neighbors that they might remove their traps or, at the least, place them a distance from valuable landscape plants.Try to resist the temptation to use a broad-spectrum residual insecticide, which will kill beneficial insects along with the Japanese beetles.
FEATURES
August 17, 1997
I'm sick and tired of having to buy all new annuals every year for my little flower garden. Aren't there some that will drop their seeds and regrow next year?Many flowering annuals readily reseed in Maryland gardens. The list includes hollyhocks, cleome, four-o'clocks, dianthus, balsam and nigella.Groundhogs have chomped on everything worth eating in my garden. I live in a densely populated suburb and need some "gentler, kinder" ideas for banishing these creatures.Wildlife as a whole has been quite interested in vegetable gardens this season because of the drought.
FEATURES
By CLARINDA HARRISS RAYMOND | August 18, 1991
SATURDAY, AUG. 3"O rose, thou'rt sick!"Seldom has a line by William Blake been hissed with such specific viciousness."You OK?" my neighbor Joe asks me. "I've been watching you for a while now. Just standing there glaring into that rosebush." He is kind enough not to add "and talking to yourself."Actually, what I've been glaring at for the past five or 10 minutes is one single pink rose. One single pink and black rose."All I can say is, I wouldn't want to be whatever it is you're looking at!"
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetis hippodromehatter@aol.com | July 21, 2011
Two decades ago, I planted several frost-tender gladiolus corms (tiny bulbs). Then, to my surprise, instead of the bulbs freezing and perishing during winter, they sprouted and bloomed the following spring. They've sprouted and bloomed every summer since. Why? The corms were planted against a south-facing wall. There, evidently, the ground doesn't freeze deep enough to kill them. In any case, as our gladioli begin to bloom this season in shades of red, yellow, orange and white, I'm noticing colors that I hadn't anticipated.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | July 14, 2011
Two decades ago, I planted several frost-tender gladiolus "corms" (tiny bulbs). Then, to my surprise, instead of the bulbs freezing and perishing during winter, they sprouted and bloomed the following spring. They've sprouted and bloomed every summer since. Why? The corms were planted against a south-facing wall. There, evidently, the ground doesn't freeze deep enough to kill them. In any case, as our gladioluses begin to bloom this season in shades of red, yellow, orange and white, I'm noticing colors that I hadn't anticipated.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
Under any other circumstances, we might admire their striking metallic green and bronze uniforms and their tenacious grip. But Japanese beetles are back this year in astonishing numbers. They're gobbling up linden tree leaves, rose bushes and vegetable gardens, and they're hooking up with each other at a furious rate. Steve Black, who started a tree nursery this year in Adamstown, near Frederick, likens the infestation at his farm to a biblical plague. "I have them clustered six deep on trees they supposedly don't like," he said.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 22, 2001
Q. I have not seen many Japanese beetles this year. Are they on the decline? A. I think it would be incorrect to say they are on the decline, but some entomologists think that the population of Japanese beetles is stabilizing. In other words, they are finding their niche in our area and some natural checks and balances have developed to limit their population. Also, the populations of all insects can vary quite a bit from year to year. There may be more beetles next year. Q. Last year I planted some chrysanthemums in late summer.
FEATURES
August 17, 1997
I'm sick and tired of having to buy all new annuals every year for my little flower garden. Aren't there some that will drop their seeds and regrow next year?Many flowering annuals readily reseed in Maryland gardens. The list includes hollyhocks, cleome, four-o'clocks, dianthus, balsam and nigella.Groundhogs have chomped on everything worth eating in my garden. I live in a densely populated suburb and need some "gentler, kinder" ideas for banishing these creatures.Wildlife as a whole has been quite interested in vegetable gardens this season because of the drought.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 27, 1997
Chomp! Chomp! Rustle, rustle. Can you hear it? The imperceptible sound of tiny, steely mandibles in an annual orgy of destruction? It is Japanese beetle time again.It's not just your imagination either, if they seem to be worse than ever this year. Last year's extra-wet summer made it easy for the females to lay their eggs in the moist, softened soil, and the mild winter virtually ensured that nearly every egg laid is now hatching into a fully fledged Japanese beetle.Many plants attackedRegarded by most gardeners with a well-deserved mixture of horror and extreme aggravation, these beetles have long been the plague of roses and other beloved flowers from dahlias to digitalis (unfortunately, it doesn't seem to poison them)
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | July 20, 1991
I just returned from an unusual summer vacation, during which I went nowhere and did nothing. Sometimes it's nice to stay home and get reacquainted with loved ones. I know I enjoyed it, and I think my plants did, too.Imagine puttering around the yard for a whole week, tending the flowers and vegetables without once glancing at a wristwatch or having to wash up. For seven days, time seems to stand still, even if the insects don't.For instance, I turn off the clock radio, expecting to be awakened each morning by the kiss of the sun, or the song of the birds.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 27, 2014
I was prepping the garden for my daughter's engagement party when it hit me. (We really like the guy, thanks for asking.) I was inviting these strangers into the garden, but I was about to kick all the residents out. The bugs, I mean. I was all set to open up a pair of industrial-size foggers containing insect repellent and blast to death everything that flew or crawled. And all for the comfort of my human guests. But I couldn't do it. I couldn't pull the trigger. Let everybody scratch, I decided.
FEATURES
July 21, 1996
My purple-leaf plum tree is swarming with Japanese beetles. My neighbors have a beetle trap, but I have the beetles. Should I get one, too?No! The attractant in the traps is a powerful sex hormone, luring adult beetles from miles around to your area. On the way to the traps, the beetles are eating the leaves on your tree.Suggest to your neighbors that they might remove their traps or, at the least, place them a distance from valuable landscape plants.Try to resist the temptation to use a broad-spectrum residual insecticide, which will kill beneficial insects along with the Japanese beetles.
NEWS
By Mary Gold | August 25, 1991
Experienced Howard County gardeners gloomily shook their heads last spring: the mild winter meant lots of summer bugs. The soon-to-appearhordes of flea beetles, aphids and Japanese beetles were a foregone conclusion. The smart gardener prepared for the fray.Like many weather-related adages, the warning seems to straddle the line between science and folklore. And like many such sayings, its validity, like beauty, may depend on the beholder.Sometimes we see what we think we ought to see. Sure, there have been zillions of insects this summer, but have their numbers been greater than normal?
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