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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
Myrtle M. Watson, an Army nurse whose indelible memories of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor remained with her for the rest of her life, died Feb. 11 of vascular disease at Oak Crest Village. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 98. Early in the morning of Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Mrs. Watson was busy working her first solo weekend assignment in the orthopedic ward at Schofield Hospital near Pearl Harbor, which was short-staffed because it was a weekend. She began pushing bedridden men out to a second-story lanai so they could take in a barefoot inter-regimental football game that was to be played on the hospital lawn.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George F. Carter, a retired Army colonel who witnessed the Pearl Harbor attack as a young lieutenant, died of complications from a stroke Feb. 24 at the Oak Crest retirement center. The Timonium resident was 96. Born in Oakland, Calif., he was the son of Thomas Carter and Louise Carrau Carter. He earned a bachelor's degree at St. Mary's College of California in Moraga, where he enlisted in Reserve Officers Training Corps. He began his military service as a lieutenant and was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 29, 2007
Carl M. Pickett, a Pearl Harbor survivor who later became vice president of Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., died Monday of pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 87. On Dec. 7, 1941, Mr. Pickett was aboard the destroyer USS Ralph S. Talbot moored at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. "When the attack started, I opened the hatch and saw a [Japanese] Zero coming right toward me," Mr. Pickett wrote in response to a Midwestern high school student who had asked him about his memories of the attack.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Good morning it's December 7th and, yes, it's still a day that will live in infamy. Seventy-one years later, Pearl Harbor is attracting a fair amount of search traffic on the Internet. Things should pick up photo wise as remembrances get under way in Hawaii later this morning.  We're mostly relying on Twitter today because Google is being a bit stingy this week with the trends. The search giant hasn't updated its hot trends data since Tuesday. I know we all love the Victoria Secret Fashion Show , but I'm thinking America has finally moved on to something else.
NEWS
April 10, 1999
Frank O. Cordeiro Jr.,73, who took photographs of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and Gen. Douglas MacArthur signing the Japanese surrender aboard the USS Missouri, died Monday in Trail, Ore.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | November 29, 1991
The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor came out of the blue, right?Well, not exactly. There was abundant evidence 50 years ago of an imminent assault. Relations with the country were quickly souring. Intercepted Japanese communications hinted strongly -- even giving the time -- of a raid. And an imperial submarine was sunk near Pearl Harbor only hours before the attack on Dec. 7, 1941.But of all the unheeded warnings, perhaps the most frustrating was that received by Joseph Lockard, then a 19-year-old Army private.
NEWS
December 1, 1991
On Dec. 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor -- an obscure U.S. naval base in the territory of Hawaii -- was ravaged by a Japanese attack.The devastating surprise assault propelled the United States into World War II, forever changing the face of the globe.Today through next Sunday, The Sun will publish recollections of the week that led up to Pearl Harbor, and recall the lives and times of Marylanders on the eve of cataclysm.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 26, 1993
LONDON -- The British government has begun releasing documents from Winston Churchill's secret wartime intelligence archive, but the papers have shed no light on one of the war's greatest mysteries: whether Churchill knew in advance of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.One document, dated Dec. 4, three days before the attack, is a record of a message that had been sent Dec. 2 from the Japanese foreign minister in Tokyo to the Japanese ambassador in Washington ordering him to destroy secret documents, codes and related materials.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | January 19, 1992
From The Sun Jan. 19-25, 1842JAN. 20: Robert Wilson, formerly a member of the Temperance Society, kicked his pledge to the "moles and bats," on Tuesday night last, and as a consequence abused F. Bayley, and beat his mother-in-law, for which outrageous conduct, he was committed jail.JAN. 21: Randolph's Will -- This has been decided and the slaves are free. It is reported that they are to go either to Canada or Liberia.From The Sun Jan. 19-25, 1892JAN. 19: The population of the United States increases by 1,000,000 persons yearly.
NEWS
December 23, 1998
Janet Brewster Murrow, 88, a radio broadcaster and relief worker during World War II in London, where her husband, Edward R. Murrow, was CBS' star war correspondent, died of heart failure Friday at the North Hill retirement community in Needham, Mass., where she lived.Soon after the war began in September 1939, Mrs. Murrow made her first radio broadcast, for CBS, about family life in wartime, and she became an occasional broadcaster for CBS and BBC.Her relief work included arranging for British recipients to get medicine and other supplies from American donors and helping evacuate British children to the United States.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
Myrtle M. Watson, an Army nurse whose indelible memories of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor remained with her for the rest of her life, died Feb. 11 of vascular disease at Oak Crest Village. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 98. Early in the morning of Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Mrs. Watson was busy working her first solo weekend assignment in the orthopedic ward at Schofield Hospital near Pearl Harbor, which was short-staffed because it was a weekend. She began pushing bedridden men out to a second-story lanai so they could take in a barefoot inter-regimental football game that was to be played on the hospital lawn.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 15, 2009
When President Barack Obama went to Oslo, Norway, last week, he knew he was bringing with him a major contradiction. He was there to accept the Nobel Peace Prize at a time he was carrying out his responsibilities as a war president waging armed combat in two foreign countries. He also knew the prize was being bestowed on him more out of promise than for performance, to the surprise and dismay of many committed pacifists around the world. As he had done on first hearing of the award, he acknowledged that "my accomplishments are slight" and that there were many others "far more deserving if this honor than I."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
J oseph Lloyd Alsop, who was stationed aboard a Navy minesweeper during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later participated in the D-Day landing in Normandy, died Nov. 23 of respiratory failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 88. Mr. Alsop was born and raised in Fredericksburg, Va., and after high school enlisted in the Navy in 1939. On Dec. 6, 1941, Mr. Alsop's ship, the USS Boggs, an old three-stack World War I-era destroyer that had been converted to a high-speed minesweeper, was steaming into Pearl Harbor after a week at sea towing targets for gunnery practice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
Joseph Lloyd Alsop, who was stationed aboard a Navy minesweeper during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later participated in the D-Day landing in Normandy, died Nov. 23 of respiratory failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 88. Mr. Alsop was born and raised in Fredericksburg, Va., and after high school enlisted in the Navy in 1939. On Dec. 6, 1941, Mr. Alsop's ship, the USS Boggs, an old three-stack World War I-era destroyer that had been converted to a high-speed minesweeper, was steaming into Pearl Harbor after a week at sea towing targets for gunnery practice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
H erman J. Travers, a retired postal worker who survived the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later received two Bronze Stars for heroism during the Battle of Peleiu, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Tuesday at Genesis Loch Raven Center. He was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised in Canton, Mr. Travers attended Patterson High School for a year before dropping out and going to work in waterfront packing houses in Fells Point and Canton to help support his family.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | December 8, 2008
On previous December Sevenths, Thomas Talbott marked the anniversary alongside a group of men who also survived the attack on Pearl Harbor. Yesterday - 67 years after what President Franklin D. Roosevelt called "a date which will live in infamy" - Talbott, 87, was one of just two survivors who made it to a ceremony aboard the Coast Guard cutter Taney in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. As he waited for the program to begin, he sat next to Warren Coligny, also 87. Coligny, who was bundled up and sitting in a wheelchair, has Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
By Doug Struck | December 5, 1991
Total victory for the Japanese at Pearl Harbor slips away at 8:10 a.m. The aircraft carrier Lexington eases out of Hawaii at that hour, the last of the three aircraft carriers based there to leave port.For all the carnage and destruction the Japanese would wreak on Pearl Harbor in two more days, it is the aircraft carriers they are after. The attack on Pearl Harbor is not so much an attempt to defeat the United States as to cripple the Americans long enough for Japan to seize and hold the Western Pacific and Indochina.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
John W. Lynch, a retired naval officer whose career spanned more than four decades, died Monday of complications of a stroke at the Lorien Nursing Home in Columbia. He was 82.The Columbia resident was born and raised in Pikesville and graduated from Calvert Hall College. He enlisted in the Navy in 1932.During his naval service, he witnessed some of the major events and personalities of the era.He recounted his life in an 800-page memoir, "Around the World in 80 Years," which was privately printed several years ago and took nine years to complete.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 29, 2007
Carl M. Pickett, a Pearl Harbor survivor who later became vice president of Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co., died Monday of pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Annapolis resident was 87. On Dec. 7, 1941, Mr. Pickett was aboard the destroyer USS Ralph S. Talbot moored at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. "When the attack started, I opened the hatch and saw a [Japanese] Zero coming right toward me," Mr. Pickett wrote in response to a Midwestern high school student who had asked him about his memories of the attack.
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