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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
Poor Lain. Where some people struggle with Internet addiction, she has the Internet addicted to her. Lain is the hero of "Serial Experiments Lain," a Japanese animated series about a junior high schoolgirl who discovers that there's a second, virtual Lain living in "the wired" (as she and her friends call the online universe). The Wired's Lain is sassy, self-confident, and unafraid to challenge authority - the polar opposite of shy, waif-like real world Lain. But although that irreverent personality has made the other Lain a hero to computer users across the net, the virtual Lain's penchant for pranks and sniggering has left the real world's Lain ostracized and doubting her own sanity.
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By Tim Swift | January 31, 2010
FILM Anime Night at Towson: Saturdays this semester, Towson University's Anime Club presents the best of Japanese animation with a side of scholarly discussion. First up: the Victorian adventure "Steamboy" from Katsuhiro Otomo, the director of the anime film "Akira." Starts 7:30 p.m. Saturday at Van Bokkelen Hall Auditorium on campus. Web: towson.edu/emf COMEDY Aisha Tyler: You probably remember her as one of Ross' beautiful girlfriends on "Friends," but Tyler is a lot more than just a pretty face.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 1997
In Japan, the word "otaku" is something of an insult. Although it originally referred to dedicated hobbyists -- particularly hard-core fans of manga (comics) and anime (animation) -- it has over time acquired the aroma of obsession, suggesting a lack of social skills, nerdiness and geekdom.Most Japanese cringe at the term.In America, on the other hand, anime (pronounced "ah-nee-may") fans wear the label with pride. They have anime societies, Internet newsgroups, even their own conventions, such as Otakon '97. Billing itself as the "Convention of Otaku Generation," it will run for three days at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, starting today, and will feature everything from panel discussions and video marathons to a costume ball.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 20, 2009
Yes, that was a pack of Samurai strolling down Howard Street near the Baltimore Convention Center. But that giant marshmallow? That was actually "Happi Paper," a giant dancing roll of toilet paper "with a simple heart and a kind soul." Such characters convene each year in Baltimore for Otakon, the largest anime and Asian culture convention in the country, which ended Sunday. More than 25,000 people - many dressed in full cartoon costume or sporting punky hairdos or wielding enormous cardboard swords - attended this year.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 5, 1999
Casey Hollis had only one complaint about Otakon '99: It was too good.A 23-year-old computer programmer from Orlando, Fla., Hollis has been attending Japanese animation conventions (or "cons") for three years now. But he'd never been to a con like Otakon, which drew more than 4,500 fans to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend.Although Otakon is devoted to anime (the Japanese word for animation), there was more to the con than just watching animation. There were panel discussions, video tournaments, a dealer's room, a costume contest, a game show and even a couple of miniconcerts.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 16, 1996
Let's say you like Japanese animation, or "anime." You own a couple videos, rent others from time to time and know just enough about the field to know what you like. You're a fan.On the other hand, let's say you spend several hours a day watching anime. You have several shelves of videotapes -- both commercial releases and second-generation, hand-subtitled copies of Japanese videos -- and a couple dozen CDs of anime soundtracks. And a couple hand-painted resin models of your favorite anime characters.
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone - she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library began. As Morgan slung the boomerang over her back, Tessa Fowler, 12, unsheathed her plastic sword and Shawna Phelps, 15, stapled clouds of red fabric to a black cape.
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By J. D. CONSIDINE and J. D. CONSIDINE,SUN STAFF | July 1, 1999
Baltimore can expect the Sailor Scouts to be out in force this weekend.But don't worry. It isn't some kind of cosmic calamity bringing Sailor Moon and her interplanetary crew of injustice-battling Japanese schoolgirls to the Inner Harbor.They're coming for a convention.Otakon -- the "Convention of Otaku Generation" -- will be bringing some 4,000 Japanese animation fans to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend. A three-day celebration of anime (the Japanese word for animation) and anime fan culture, the convention offers everything from panel discussions and non-stop screenings to hotly contested video-game tournaments and costume contests.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2003
NOW OR NEVER For fans of Japanese animation (anime), J-rock, J-pop, or East Asian pop culture at large, there is Otakon, coming to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend. The largest convention of its kind on the East Coast, Otakon offers nonstop screenings of anime and Asian films and a performance by Japanese chart-topping musical act TM Revolution, who makes his U.S. debut Saturday at 3 p.m. Panel discussions with anime directors, voice actors and artists, and karaoke and costume contests are also scheduled.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 7, 2000
Crossing the pedestrian bridge over Light Street, a young woman in a Japanese school girl's uniform and bright blue wig cheerily greets a friend dressed in a bright yellow leotard with a large, lightning bolt tail. A few blocks over, a fellow dressed in what appears to be an admiral's uniform crosses Pratt Street and heads toward the Burger King, where he ends up standing in line behind several samurai. Who says young people won't dress up to go out anymore? But if the Inner Harbor looked like the site of an elaborate costume party this weekend, that's because it was - a least for some people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 16, 2009
Come this weekend, mild-mannered Harford Community College student Brad Brooks will transform. He'll slip on a black and silver outfit, complete with a black vest, big collar and silver belt. He'll don a turquoise blue wig "that's supposed to be really spiky." And then he'll slip down to the Baltimore Convention Center, and he'll fit right in. For this is Otakon weekend, when fans of Japanese pop culture gather from all over the world. They'll attend concerts by Japanese performers rarely seen on these shores, watch the latest in Japanese animation (called anime, by those in the know)
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | March 1, 2006
Morgan Johnson called her mother frantically on her cell phone - she had left the giant boomerang at home. The 5-foot-long boomerang, which dwarfed the petite 13-year-old, was essential to Morgan's costume, Sango the Demon Hunter. Morgan had cut the shape from foam, wrapped it in duct tape and painted it tan and brown. Luckily, her mother rushed in with the boomerang just as the costume contest at Saturday's anime and manga convention at the Brooklyn Park library began. As Morgan slung the boomerang over her back, Tessa Fowler, 12, unsheathed her plastic sword and Shawna Phelps, 15, stapled clouds of red fabric to a black cape.
FEATURES
By George Gene Gustines and George Gene Gustines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 2005
Sales of Japanese comics - more familiarly known as manga - are exploding in the United States, and much of the boom is due to efforts by comic book publishers to extend their reach beyond young male readers. Beyond all males, in fact. "Manga producers in the United States have tapped into a new audience for comics - the female consumer," said Milton Griepp, the publisher and founder of ICv2, an online trade publication that covers pop culture for retailers. In bookstores, the colorful, digest-size manga collections are usually next to the shelves of graphic novels, which feature iconic domestic characters like Batman and Spider-Man.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
To just throw on any old clothes is to miss the spirit of Otakon 2004, the 11th annual gathering of fans whose lives revolve, in ways unfathomable to some but perfectly understandable to them, around Japanese animation and other benchmarks of Far Eastern popular culture. No, to really experience Otakon, you have to dress the part. Not that they won't let you inside the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend if you insist on sporting nothing more spectacular than a T-shirt and blue jeans; you pay your money ($55 for a weekend pass, $40 for today only, $20 for tomorrow)
NEWS
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2003
Melissa Wilson of Nashville, Tenn., came dressed as Princess from Battle of the Planets. Veronica Hines of Owings Mills came as Kojirou from Yami No Matsuei. Tina Roland of Wildwood, N.J., came as "Nicholas Wolfwood" from Trigun. They were among the thousands of mostly teens and those in their 20s who came to Baltimore this weekend decked out in their best Japanese character costumes or to admire costumes at the 10th annual Otakon. For those who don't know Wolfwood from Kojirou, Otakon is the largest Japanese animation festival on the East Coast and the second-largest in the country, according to organizers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2003
NOW OR NEVER For fans of Japanese animation (anime), J-rock, J-pop, or East Asian pop culture at large, there is Otakon, coming to the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend. The largest convention of its kind on the East Coast, Otakon offers nonstop screenings of anime and Asian films and a performance by Japanese chart-topping musical act TM Revolution, who makes his U.S. debut Saturday at 3 p.m. Panel discussions with anime directors, voice actors and artists, and karaoke and costume contests are also scheduled.
NEWS
By Cheryl Johnston and Cheryl Johnston,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2003
Melissa Wilson of Nashville, Tenn., came dressed as Princess from Battle of the Planets. Veronica Hines of Owings Mills came as Kojirou from Yami No Matsuei. Tina Roland of Wildwood, N.J., came as "Nicholas Wolfwood" from Trigun. They were among the thousands of mostly teens and those in their 20s who came to Baltimore this weekend decked out in their best Japanese character costumes or to admire costumes at the 10th annual Otakon. For those who don't know Wolfwood from Kojirou, Otakon is the largest Japanese animation festival on the East Coast and the second-largest in the country, according to organizers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
To just throw on any old clothes is to miss the spirit of Otakon 2004, the 11th annual gathering of fans whose lives revolve, in ways unfathomable to some but perfectly understandable to them, around Japanese animation and other benchmarks of Far Eastern popular culture. No, to really experience Otakon, you have to dress the part. Not that they won't let you inside the Baltimore Convention Center this weekend if you insist on sporting nothing more spectacular than a T-shirt and blue jeans; you pay your money ($55 for a weekend pass, $40 for today only, $20 for tomorrow)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 7, 2000
Crossing the pedestrian bridge over Light Street, a young woman in a Japanese school girl's uniform and bright blue wig cheerily greets a friend dressed in a bright yellow leotard with a large, lightning bolt tail. A few blocks over, a fellow dressed in what appears to be an admiral's uniform crosses Pratt Street and heads toward the Burger King, where he ends up standing in line behind several samurai. Who says young people won't dress up to go out anymore? But if the Inner Harbor looked like the site of an elaborate costume party this weekend, that's because it was - a least for some people.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
Poor Lain. Where some people struggle with Internet addiction, she has the Internet addicted to her. Lain is the hero of "Serial Experiments Lain," a Japanese animated series about a junior high schoolgirl who discovers that there's a second, virtual Lain living in "the wired" (as she and her friends call the online universe). The Wired's Lain is sassy, self-confident, and unafraid to challenge authority - the polar opposite of shy, waif-like real world Lain. But although that irreverent personality has made the other Lain a hero to computer users across the net, the virtual Lain's penchant for pranks and sniggering has left the real world's Lain ostracized and doubting her own sanity.
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