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By Gene Oishi and Gene Oishi,Gene Oishi is the author of "In Search of Hiroshi," an autobiographical account of the Japanese-American experience | October 21, 1990
My mother is 97 years old and was among the first Japanese-Americans to receive a check for $20,000 from the the government for her internment during World War II. I do not know exactly what this payment means to her; I am not even sure how it will affect me when I receive my check two years hence. But I do know that the reparations will have a different meaning for every generation.During the war, 120,000 Japanese-Americans were locked i camps. In 1988, Congress passed legislation granting $20,000 to each of the 60,000 survivors.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
One of the ugliest chapters in American history seems all the more painful to recall right now, with the hideous toll of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan still climbing, still threatening. But that chapter — the prison camps for loyal American citizens of Japanese descent after the outbreak of World War II — provides the chilling backdrop of David Guterson's popular 1994 novel "Snow Falling on Cedars. " The book, which was turned into a film and, more recently, a play, spins a "To Kill a Mockingbird"-like tale of murder, suspicion and prejudice in the Pacific Northwest, early 1950s, filtered through the residue of anti-Japanese sentiment that the war left behind.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 8, 1995
MARENGO, Ill. -- On a brisk fall day, months before the Pacific War ended, Sakaye Kometani arrived at her new home to find a ramshackle farmhouse overgrown with 5-foot ragweed, an outhouse in the yard, no running water. The four Kometani children never forgot that day -- it was the first time they saw their mother cry."Dad," they remember her tearfully saying, "how can you bring us to a place like this?"Freed from the barbed wire confinement of an internment camp, Mrs. Kometani and the children traveled from Wyoming to Chicago, then northwest to Marengo and a reunion with her husband.
NEWS
July 22, 2005
To prepare for a possible Allied invasion of Japan, a special detachment of Japanese-American soldiers began training troops at Fort Meade during the last week of July 1945. The 13 soldiers, attached to a U.S. military intelligence training unit, instructed 1,200 soldiers that week on the organization and tactics of Japanese infantry units, in the operation and characteristics of Japanese weaponry, and in the use of simple Japanese phrases. As it turned out, the training was not needed.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Standing in a Hiroshima park in 1989 trying to picture the devastation and the horror of nearly a half-century ago, Kathryn M. Stahl's quest to unravel the past began.The 17-year-old, whose mother is Japanese, set out to quench her thirst for knowledge of her heritage. Now, her extensive study of how Japanese-Americans fared during World War II has helped earn her Harford County's outstanding history student award."When you learn about U.S. history, there's not a lot about what happened to Japanese-Americans," she says.
NEWS
By Chiaki Kawajiri | August 17, 1997
THE YOUNG Japanese was terrified. Captured by the enemy and surrounded by strange, white faces, he had no idea what to expect - only that it would probably be bad. Above all, he feared interrogation, not knowing what the Americans would do to extract information from him.But when he was taken into the interrogation room, he found himself facing what looked like another Japanese. Why, the man even spoke Japanese! For a moment, he didn't care that this was a U.S. soldier. He was just glad there was someone who would understand him.That was part of what made Japanese Americans like Warren Tsuneishi an important part of the U.S. campaign in the Pacific during World War II.As Tsuneishi says now, "Seeing a Japanese face talking in Japanese made [the prisoners]
NEWS
January 1, 1997
Did we really intern the Japanese?Regarding the Dec. 19 letter by Julie E. Kraft, ''War-time internment was discrimination,'' one of the most frustrating historical distortions for World War II veterans is the propagation of the myth about the wartime internment of enemy aliens and their American-born children.Ms. Kraft's letter helps to perpetuate this myth with her statement that only Japanese-Americans were interned (implying that they were all U.S. citizens) and with her statement: ''It does seem strange that the U.S. did not place German-Americans in internment camps during Word War II.`The facts are that thousands of adult Japanese were evacuated from military zones along the West Coast for well-documented security reasons and that those with nowhere to go were housed in government relocation centers, which were not internment camps.
NEWS
December 26, 1996
Other factors led to Japanese internmentWith respect to the Dec. 16 letter from Tom Chalkley, "No excuse to intern Japanese Americans," I agree that the internment of Japanese Americans was uncalled for. However, important contributing factors are obscured when emphasizing bare racism and calling legitimate fears ''war hysteria."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
One of the ugliest chapters in American history seems all the more painful to recall right now, with the hideous toll of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan still climbing, still threatening. But that chapter — the prison camps for loyal American citizens of Japanese descent after the outbreak of World War II — provides the chilling backdrop of David Guterson's popular 1994 novel "Snow Falling on Cedars. " The book, which was turned into a film and, more recently, a play, spins a "To Kill a Mockingbird"-like tale of murder, suspicion and prejudice in the Pacific Northwest, early 1950s, filtered through the residue of anti-Japanese sentiment that the war left behind.
NEWS
January 10, 1997
Criminal justice system failed slain childIn your Jan. 7 editorial commenting on the tragic murder of a 3-year-old boy in a barber shop, ("Another senseless slaying"), you ask, ''What's wrong with this city?''From the articles detailing the previous arrest histories of the suspects in this case, including such alleged offenses as attempted murder, assault, drug and handgun violations, the more appropriate question might well be, ''What's wrong with our criminal justice system?''It seems that the only part of it that's functioning well is the police force.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2004
JEROME COUNTY, Idaho - The big, white Starline bus rolls to a stop and Jeni Yamada is the first to stand. It has taken a long time to get to this place in the middle of nowhere, this place called Minidoka. Far longer than the 12-hour, 650-mile trip from Seattle just ended, or the flight from Baltimore days before. More than six decades ago, Jeni's mother, uncles and grandmother lived here behind barbed wire, under armed guard, in a drafty, tar-papered barracks. With some 120,000 other Japanese immigrants and their American-born children, they were interned during World War II - summarily evicted from their homes and communities, rounded up, put on trains and buses, and sent here or to one of nine other hastily erected camps.
NEWS
By Chiaki Kawajiri | August 17, 1997
THE YOUNG Japanese was terrified. Captured by the enemy and surrounded by strange, white faces, he had no idea what to expect - only that it would probably be bad. Above all, he feared interrogation, not knowing what the Americans would do to extract information from him.But when he was taken into the interrogation room, he found himself facing what looked like another Japanese. Why, the man even spoke Japanese! For a moment, he didn't care that this was a U.S. soldier. He was just glad there was someone who would understand him.That was part of what made Japanese Americans like Warren Tsuneishi an important part of the U.S. campaign in the Pacific during World War II.As Tsuneishi says now, "Seeing a Japanese face talking in Japanese made [the prisoners]
NEWS
January 10, 1997
Criminal justice system failed slain childIn your Jan. 7 editorial commenting on the tragic murder of a 3-year-old boy in a barber shop, ("Another senseless slaying"), you ask, ''What's wrong with this city?''From the articles detailing the previous arrest histories of the suspects in this case, including such alleged offenses as attempted murder, assault, drug and handgun violations, the more appropriate question might well be, ''What's wrong with our criminal justice system?''It seems that the only part of it that's functioning well is the police force.
NEWS
January 1, 1997
Did we really intern the Japanese?Regarding the Dec. 19 letter by Julie E. Kraft, ''War-time internment was discrimination,'' one of the most frustrating historical distortions for World War II veterans is the propagation of the myth about the wartime internment of enemy aliens and their American-born children.Ms. Kraft's letter helps to perpetuate this myth with her statement that only Japanese-Americans were interned (implying that they were all U.S. citizens) and with her statement: ''It does seem strange that the U.S. did not place German-Americans in internment camps during Word War II.`The facts are that thousands of adult Japanese were evacuated from military zones along the West Coast for well-documented security reasons and that those with nowhere to go were housed in government relocation centers, which were not internment camps.
NEWS
December 26, 1996
Other factors led to Japanese internmentWith respect to the Dec. 16 letter from Tom Chalkley, "No excuse to intern Japanese Americans," I agree that the internment of Japanese Americans was uncalled for. However, important contributing factors are obscured when emphasizing bare racism and calling legitimate fears ''war hysteria."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In the subdued elegance of this drawing room off the lobby of the Jefferson Hotel, David Guterson's about as far from home as he can get in the continental United States.Here to talk about his first novel, "Snow Falling on Cedars," Mr. Guterson's in a small salon paneled in warm dark wood, furnished in moderately good reproductions and hung with minor documents signed by Thomas Jefferson.At home, Mr. Guterson lives and writes in a drafty rented house built around the turn of the century on Bainbridge Island, which is across Puget Sound from Seattle, on the other side of the country.
NEWS
July 22, 2005
To prepare for a possible Allied invasion of Japan, a special detachment of Japanese-American soldiers began training troops at Fort Meade during the last week of July 1945. The 13 soldiers, attached to a U.S. military intelligence training unit, instructed 1,200 soldiers that week on the organization and tactics of Japanese infantry units, in the operation and characteristics of Japanese weaponry, and in the use of simple Japanese phrases. As it turned out, the training was not needed.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 7, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Grace Takahashi Mori was just one semester short of a high school diploma in 1942 when her family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans were ordered into internment camps to live out World War II.Fifty years later, what should have been happy memories of Ms. Mori's days at Roosevelt High School have turned to darker images of her family's abrupt departure from their Boyle Heights neighborhood, and of the barbed wire and armed sentries at...
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 8, 1995
MARENGO, Ill. -- On a brisk fall day, months before the Pacific War ended, Sakaye Kometani arrived at her new home to find a ramshackle farmhouse overgrown with 5-foot ragweed, an outhouse in the yard, no running water. The four Kometani children never forgot that day -- it was the first time they saw their mother cry."Dad," they remember her tearfully saying, "how can you bring us to a place like this?"Freed from the barbed wire confinement of an internment camp, Mrs. Kometani and the children traveled from Wyoming to Chicago, then northwest to Marengo and a reunion with her husband.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 7, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Grace Takahashi Mori was just one semester short of a high school diploma in 1942 when her family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans were ordered into internment camps to live out World War II.Fifty years later, what should have been happy memories of Ms. Mori's days at Roosevelt High School have turned to darker images of her family's abrupt departure from their Boyle Heights neighborhood, and of the barbed wire and armed sentries at...
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