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By Teddy Greenstein, Tribune reporter | June 19, 2010
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — He's a teenager with a huge following — literally. Wherever Japan's Ryo Ishikawa goes, a media contingent of about 40 follows. "I've played with him in Japan and it's even worse over there," said Rory McIlroy, who watched Ishikawa shoot 70-71 to put himself in contention at the U.S. Open. "He handles it very, very well. That's probably the most impressive thing about him — apart from how he plays golf." Ishikawa, who stands 5 feet 7, 140 pounds and won't turn 19 until September, shot a 12-under 58 last month to win his seventh Japan Tour title.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Edward J. Rasmussen, a retired insurance broker who also translated Japanese, died June 20 of pneumonia at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 95. The son of J. David Rasmussen, a New York City insurance broker, and Ellamae Rasmussen, a homemaker, Edward Jeppe Rasmussen was born in Brooklyn and spent his early years in Queens before moving with his family to Scarsdale. After graduating from Scarsdale High School in 1937, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1942 from Dartmouth College.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | March 24, 2010
L ike a lot of people in the Baltimore area, Robyn Cincinnati grew up eating fish on Friday. But last Friday, as she bought a fresh Alfonsino, a large red fish that a few days before had been swimming in a Japanese sea, she knew her family supper was going to be different. "This is going to be a whole new fish-on-Friday Lent experience," she said, adding that her husband, Greg Moore, would probably flash-fry the far-flung fish. Cincinnati was one of a number of area fish eaters who showed up at a Japanese seafood festival last weekend at the Wegmans grocery store in Hunt Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
Pabu is shutting down this weekend, but a new Japanese restaurant will be taking its place, according to operators. The small-plate format will be gone, replaced by a more traditional fine-dining concept. "Our number one priority is taking care of our locals," said Alex Smith, whose Atlas Restaurant Group is taking over the spaces currently operating as Pabu and Lamill in The Four Seasons Hotel Baltimore. "[Pabu] never did a great job of attracting the local crowd," he said. Smith, who owns Ouzo Bay, an upscale Greek restaurant in Harbor East, said that several Ouzo Bay customers who had seen news coverage of the Pabu closing told him they had never heard of Pabu.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 6, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Two Japanese automakers have asked the Commerce Department to extend reduced duties they pay on imported parts for their American-made cars.The companies want to expand their factories in the United States without paying higher tariffs on the additional parts they will need to import.Since opening U.S. factories in the 1980s, Toyota Motor Corp. and Nissan Motor Co., like Detroit's Big Three automakers, have held an exemption that lets them pay duties of no more than 2.5 percent on parts they import for assembly.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | January 23, 1992
Los Angeles. -- So the Japanese, or at least their equivalent of Tom Foley, think Americans are all lazy and unproductive. I hope they're right.The ''charge,'' if that's what it is, came over the weekend from Yoshio Sakurauchi, speaker of the Japanese house of representatives, chiding us for not being more like the Japanese.His arrogance might make some of us realize what we sound like when we constantly tell people in other cultures to be more like us. But who wants to live like the Japanese?
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 22, 1997
EXOTIC STRAINS of Japanese music filled the air at Longfellow Elementary School last week as Shizumi, a Japanese-born choreographer and dancer, visited the school."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
Under any other circumstances, we might admire their striking metallic green and bronze uniforms and their tenacious grip. But Japanese beetles are back this year in astonishing numbers. They're gobbling up linden tree leaves, rose bushes and vegetable gardens, and they're hooking up with each other at a furious rate. Steve Black, who started a tree nursery this year in Adamstown, near Frederick, likens the infestation at his farm to a biblical plague. "I have them clustered six deep on trees they supposedly don't like," he said.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 13, 1991
SALEM, W.Va. -- When the annual apple butter festival opens in this tiny Appalachian town today, revelers will find many familiar standbys: an apple pie bake-off, a quilt show and a contest for the longest squirrel tail.But after the clogging exhibition and just before the greased pig contest, they will encounter two new entries that have nothing to do with the traditions of the community and everything to do with its future: displays of origami and demonstrations of Japanese martial arts.
BUSINESS
By Ronald Rosenberg and Mary Sit and Ronald Rosenberg and Mary Sit,Boston Globe | June 2, 1991
BOSTON -- Japan, for all its success, continues to struggl with what American science does best: basic research. Now, Japan is trying to do something about that by reaching into the heart of the American scientific community.Mitsubishi Electric Corp., the $20 billion Japanese industrial giant, recently announced plans to open a 100-person basic research laboratory just blocks from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The lab will be devoted to studying the fundamentals of computer science.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
A Japanese firm that has a long history with Baltimore-based Hedwin Corp. was named the winning bidder for the manufacturer in a bankruptcy auction Friday, a development that Hedwin officials said would save the company's 300 jobs. Fujimori Kogyo Co. offered $22.2 million after just over two hours of bidding, up from its initial bid of $16.5 million. A team from rival bidder Inteplast Group, a New Jersey maker of plastic products, huddled in another room for five minutes and returned to bow out. "Inteplast has decided not to bid further in this auction," said Arthur E. Rosenberg, an attorney for the company.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Hedwin Corp. will be auctioned off Friday as two bidders vie for the Baltimore maker of plastic containers. The company - which sought Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last month - received a qualified bid from New Jersey-based Inteplast Group, according to attorney Alan Grochal, who represents Hedwin. Inteplast, which makes plastic products, declined to comment. The initial bidder is Fujimori Kogyo Co., a Japanese company that offered $16.5 million for Hedwin and indicated that it intends to retain all 300 employees.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George F. Carter, a retired Army colonel who witnessed the Pearl Harbor attack as a young lieutenant, died of complications from a stroke Feb. 24 at the Oak Crest retirement center. The Timonium resident was 96. Born in Oakland, Calif., he was the son of Thomas Carter and Louise Carrau Carter. He earned a bachelor's degree at St. Mary's College of California in Moraga, where he enlisted in Reserve Officers Training Corps. He began his military service as a lieutenant and was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
A new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum is an homage to unsteady hands and uncertain tempers, to chips and nicks, to the inconsistent and unfinished. In "Designed for Flowers: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics," many of the 60 vases on display contain an obvious and intentional flaw. One artist, who is known for kicking each pot with a boot before it is fired, has deliberately gouged a small V-shaped segment from his vessel's rim. In a vase by another artist, the upper lip of the vase departs from a uniform circle and wobbles slightly.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
The bidding for Japanese right-hander Masahiro Tanaka ends on Jan. 24. The Orioles won't be in on it. Tanaka, who is 25 and was 24-0 with a 1.27 ERA in 28 games (27 starts) for the Rakuten Golden Eagles of Japan's Pacific League last season, is probably in line for a seven-year contract that will push well above $100 million. Considering the Orioles have never gone beyond three years for a MLB free-agent pitcher, Tanaka is well out of their comfort zone. Orioles executive vice president Dan Duquette said that - point blank - earlier this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Dorothy Miller from Towson was looking for a recipe for what she called "Oriental fruitcake. " She said the layer cake was made with pineapple, coconut, walnuts and raisins. Faith Hermann from Relay sent in a recipe for a Japanese fruitcake that her mother used to make that she thought sounded very similar to the cake Miller had described. According to Bill Neal, author of "Biscuits, Spoonbread, and Sweet Potato Pie," Japanese fruitcake is "an exotically named, typically Southern dessert cake, especially popular in the twentieth century.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | November 24, 1991
Easton -- Here along the banks of the Miles River, a house sits quietly apart. It is named for a haiku and patterned after geese in flight, and for its owners, it is a dream fulfilled: a house that draws its design from the traditional Japanese teahouse.The owners are a retired couple (who do not wish to be identified). The husband is a retired Marine colonel who spent several years stationed in Japan and during this time he was captivated by the teahouse."The teahouse architecture evolved out of the tea ceremony where the Japanese celebrate purity, refinement and withdrawal from material concerns," says Wayne Good, the Annapolis architect who designed the house.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1991
TOKYO -- With more than two weeks to go before President George Bush's thrice-delayed state visit here, Japanese commentators are criticizing it as a bizarre blunder."
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
As expected, the Orioles have declined left-hander Tsuyoshi Wada's $5-million option for next season, the club announced on Saturday evening. Wada, signed as an international free agent for a two-year, $8.14-million deal before the 2012 season, never threw a pitch in a regular season game for the Orioles. His Orioles career was riddled by injury. He began his first major league season on the disabled list, then had season-ending Tommy John surgery on his left elbow in May 2012.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | August 19, 2013
To Hatsumi Watanabe-Smith, Ellicott City's new Japanese tea parlor is a “daydream” come true. Matcha Time Cafe, according to Watanabe-Smith, fills a void in the local tea market and in her life -- having missed the shop's signature green matcha brew since moving to the United States some 20 years ago. Brewed from tea leaves ground into a fine powder, matcha is a somewhat thick green tea touted for its antioxidant qualities. To offset its bitterness, it is traditionally served with a confection, such as red-bean-filled mochi.
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