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SPORTS
By Mike Preston | March 14, 2011
To fill up my car with gasoline Sunday afternoon, it cost $48. That is a concern because there doesn't seem to be an end to the rising prices. There isn't that type of concern about NFL owners locking out their players. Every time I watch the news and see thousands of people in Japan who had to endure the recent tsunamis, you feel for them because homes were destroyed and lives were lost. I don't have the same sympathy for the NFL. I care about earthquakes, nuclear reactor meltdowns and the national debt.
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NEWS
March 14, 2011
The earthquake and tsunami that hit northern Japan on Friday were natural disasters of epic proportions that left the country to cope with not one but two huge challenges. Many thousands perished under the towering waters that swept ashore after the first temblor and wiped away dozens of coastal villages. In their wake, millions more were stranded without electricity, drinking water, food or shelter, and communications with the rest of the country have been virtually cut off. Compounding the humanitarian crisis is the specter of an environmental catastrophe stemming from the potential meltdown of one or more of three nuclear reactors at an electrical generating plant.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2011
The operator of Maryland's Calvert Cliffs twin reactors sought to reassure state residents that the facility remains safe, as Japan grapples with this weekend's explosion at a nuclear plant after an earthquake and tsunami. Mark Sullivan, a spokesman for the Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, said the company's plants, including Calvert Cliffs, are designed to withstand any shock plants indicated by the seismic history of the geographic areas in which they're located. Sullivan said company officials are closely monitoring the events at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Orioles right-hander Koji Uehara said he has e-mailed with his extended family members in Japan and believes they are all fine after an 8.9-magnitude earthquake and tsunami hit the country's Eastern coast Friday. "This morning, I heard about the news," Uehara said through interpreter Jiwon Bang . "The families are safe; some of the friends I can't get a hold of at this moment. I couldn't use phones, but e-mail I can use. " Uehara's wife and son are in Baltimore, but the rest of his family resides in or around Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
For the past few years, Big in Japan has been one of the more enigmatic bands on the Baltimore music scene. Made up largely of former members of electro-rockers Lake Trout, Big in Japan gigged sporadically around town, changed lineups fairly often and recorded music but never released it. They were a live band first and foremost, with a reputation for putting on killer dance shows. Much of their music was improvised. "It was a one-time-only kind of thing," said Matt Pierce, who plays keyboards and flute.
NEWS
November 9, 2010
Albert Raim, my father, grew up on Lombard Street. By the end of World War II he had trained the crews who dropped the atomic bombs on Japan in how to fly their B-29s by instruments. Martin Klein, my father-in-law, grew up on Smallwood Street. He was one of the few unwounded soldiers in the first wave to make it to Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944 — D-Day. I still find it amazing that these otherwise ordinary men had such a direct impact on two of the most monumental events in world history.
NEWS
By Michael Justin Lee | October 4, 2010
It's silly season again when holders of high office fulminate about various bogeymen to demonstrate appropriate indignation ahead of elections. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's recent testimony before both houses of Congress was a case in point, as is the bill just passed in the House of Representatives naming China a currency manipulator. Stop me if you've heard this one before. A large Asian nation rises to wealth on the strength of its exports. As a result, it builds a tremendous amount of dollar reserves — along with the increasing ire of its trading partners.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | August 24, 2010
TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS MLB Cubs@Washington (T) MASN9 a.m. Cubs@Washington MASN7 Cubs@Washington WGN-A7 Orioles@White Sox MASN28 Minnesota@Texas MLB8 Orioles@White Sox (T) MASN11:30 Little Lg. Consol.: Toms River (N.J.) vs. S. Arabia ESPN2Noon Elim. game: Panama vs. Vancouver, B.C. ESPN22 Elim. game: Hamilton (Ohio)
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | August 20, 2010
Charles County is one of four teams that will play in today's semifinals of the U.S. championship of the Cal Ripken World Series at Cal Sr.'s Yard in Aberdeen. The Maryland state champion was 3-1 in round-robin play and will face Lexington, Ky., the Ohio Valley champ, at 8 p.m. The other U.S. semifinal pits Norwalk, Conn., the New England champion, against Ocala Highlands, Fla., the Southeast champ, at 2:30 p.m. In the International semifinals, the Republic of Korea will play Mexico at 12:30 p.m. and the Dominican Republic will face Japan at 5 p.m. The International championship game will be at noon Saturday, followed by the U.S. championship at 3 p.m. The world championship game will be at 3 p.m. Sunday.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | July 23, 2010
NBA Former Towson star Neal signs three-year deal with Spurs Gary Neal (Calvert Hall, Towson) signed a three-year contract with the San Antonio Spurs on Thursday after an impressive NBA Summer League performance. Neal, who set Towson's single-season scoring record during the 2006-07 season, led the Spurs to a 5-0 record in Las Vegas, including a 25-point performance in the team's summer-league finale. In five games, he averaged a team-high 16.0 points and made 17-of-30 3-pointers.
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