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NEWS
March 22, 2011
Since the triple disaster—a 9.0 earthquake, tsunami and "nuclear meltdown"— struck Japan, we have been inundated with news coverage and a blitz of popular opinion almost around the clock ("Powerful quake and tsunami kill hundreds in Japan" March 12). Besides the deplorable rhetoric spewed by some radio figures and on the Internet, there is an undercurrent of opinion that Japan really does not need our help — indigent Haiti, yes; wealthy Japan, not so much. Nothing could be farther from the truth.
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NEWS
By Brew Barron | March 21, 2011
As a leading producer of safe, reliable and economical electricity from nuclear energy in Maryland and New York, we take seriously our role to communicate about how the Japan situation impacts our industry and energy facilities. We at Constellation Energy Nuclear Group LLC (CENG) extend our sincere sympathies to those suffering due to the tragic earthquake and tsunami. Our hearts are with those in Japan and those who have family and friends in the region. Our stakeholders (Constellation Energy and the EDF Group)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 18, 2011
On a serious note, if you're looking to make a donation to help with the unfolding disaster in Japan -- and want to have some fun at the same time -- our media partner Jackson Blue of Z104.3 is holding a happy hour benefit today.  Jackson's "Japan Relief Happy Hour" is today from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Hightopps Backstage Grill at 2306 York Road in Timonium. Members of the Red Cross will be on hand to accept donations. And if helping out your fellow humans isn't enough motivation to get you off the couch, there's a deal for $1 beers. 
NEWS
By Ron Smith | March 18, 2011
The Obamas are off to Rio de Janeiro this weekend, along with the several hundred members of the presidential travel party. Some of us wonder whether this is a good time for the president to be seen having a good time. The case could be made, though, that if enough "black swans" gather on your lawn, you might as well get out of town. Black swans are, as you may know, the name given by the writer Nassim Nicholas Taleb to highly improbable events that vastly disrupt the status quo and set the world on its ear. Once upon a time, it was indisputably true that all swans were white — true, that is, until the Europeans discovered Australia, home to swans that were black.
NEWS
By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | March 18, 2011
The National Cherry Blossom Festival and Sakura Matsuri Japanese street festival, held in conjunction in April, will be much more muted and heartfelt this year because of the disaster in Japan, officials of both events said this week. "We cannot just jump straight into the cherry blossom festival," John R. Malott, president of the Japan-America Society of Washington and a member of the blossom festival board, said this week. "We need to be aware every day of what has happened in Japan.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
For the first time since an 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit Japan, the Keio University High School lacrosse team can run in the sun and be boys again. Twenty-four players found sanctuary at Johns Hopkins' Homewood Field on Friday, escaping the trauma of the March 11 tsunami that raked the Japanese coast and ravaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. "They haven't been playing or running around on a field ever since the earthquake," said Atsuko Kuribayashi, one of three mothers serving as chaperones for the team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 17, 2011
As he filled out his NCAA tournament bracket Wednesday on ESPN (predicting the Kansas Jayhawks as winners) President Barack Obama urged viewers to donate money to relief work in Japan.  But an article in the New York Times and an opinion column from Reuters say that's a bad idea.  "Wealthy Japan is not impoverished Haiti. And many groups are raising money without really knowing how it will be spent — or even if it will be needed," the New York Times reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2011
Blogger Matthew Yglesias recently got the "Shamelessly Politicizing the Japanese Disaster" competition rolling when he demonized House Republicans with this tweet: "House GOP wants to slash National Weather Service budget, stop spending money on wasteful tsunami monitoring" -- as if, somehow, spending more money on our NWS could have prevented the fifth largest earthquake in history. Now that we've seen the first pundit break the ice, who will be the first major politician to shamelessly politicize the disaster in Japan?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | March 15, 2011
Most of us with a sense of tact know you don't joke about real, genuine human tragedy. You don't make light of a murder. You don't crack on someone who just got diagnosed with cancer. You generally don't say mean, nasty things about the dead or suffering.  So, I'm typing up this post as a helpful reminder to our friends in the political and entertainment fields who apparently have lost this sensibility.  This is the message: Don't joke about Japan. It's simply too soon. Not only are people unlikely to laugh at your joke, you're likely to get in trouble or even fired from your place of employment.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
They're poised to help, but how? The disaster relief agencies based in Baltimore, and those who donate to them, say they are ready to provide whatever assistance they can to the victims of the disaster in Japan. But for the moment, they are largely in a wait-and-see mode. "There is a role for relief efforts, for sure," said Bill Canny, director of emergency operations for Catholic Relief Services, one of several relief agencies headquartered here. "But right now, they don't need a team flying in. " Unlike some recent disasters, the earthquake followed by a tsunami and a still-threatening nuclear reactor emergency have struck a developed country with a strong infrastructure — from a well-prepared and well-financed government and military to experienced and well-funded relief institutions such as the Japan Red Cross.
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