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By Jakob Engelke | July 18, 2011
It seems Baltimoreans fell in love with the United States women's national team during its run through the World Cup this past month. According to Mac Nwulu, a member of ESPN's public relations team , Baltimore had the highest overnight rating for any U.S. city during Sunday's title game, when the United States fell to Japan in penalty kicks, 3-1, after ending overtime tied at 2. Baltimore (12.3) was nearly four points higher than the national overnight rating of 8.6. The rest of the top-five markets were San Diego (11.8)
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SPORTS
By Sports on TV | July 13, 2011
WEDNESDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Sprint Cup Quaker State 400 (T) SPEEDNoon C. base. TD Ameritrade Home Run Derby (T) CBSSN9 TD Ameritrade Home Run Derby (T) CBSSN2 a.m. MiLB Triple-A All-Star Game MLB9 Triple-A All-Star Game (T) MLB2 a.m. C. base. Michigan@Iowa (T) BIGTEN11:30 WNBA Phoenix@Minnesota NBA1 Phoenix@Minnesota (T)
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff | June 3, 2011
Just two weeks after the IndyCar series races through the streets of Baltimore on Labor Day, it will race on a road course near the Twin Ring Motegi motorsports facility after the track suffered damage from the March earthquakes. IndyCar made the announcement this morning. The race will be run on 2.98-mile, natural-terrain road course during its final visit to Twin Ring Motegi on Sept. 18. The facility was the site of Danica Patrick's only IndyCar win, the Japan 300 in 2008.
NEWS
April 21, 2011
The news of Mayor William Donald Schaefer's passing saddened many Japanese, especially the residents of Kawasaki, our sister city since 1979. The late mayor was instrumental and vital in the creation of the sister city relationship with Kawasaki. The sister city program flourished under his leadership and his tireless slogan, "Do It Now. " He traveled to Japan many times, bringing the Baltimore Orioles and the famous manager Joe Altobelli. The Japanese people love baseball too and were so impressed with our team and observing our mayor who was so involved.
NEWS
April 19, 2011
Imagine suddenly being cut off from the world. That's what happened to millions of people when a 9.0 earthquake and tsunami struck northern Japan in March. In an instant, homes were destroyed and citizens were suddenly without safe drinking water or electricity. It didn't matter that this tragedy happened 9,000 miles across the ocean from Baltimore. People needed help, and Central Marylanders stepped up to give an estimated $700,000 so far to the American Red Cross to support our Red Cross disaster relief efforts in the Pacific.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
Haruki Nakamura's charity event at Ripken Stadium raised $60,000 for emergency relief in Japan on Saturday. Nakamura, a backup safety for the Ravens who is one of several NFL players of Japanese descent, organized the event with the Red Cross to support the country after the disaster hit last month. He said he got "goosebumps" when he arrived and saw all of the purple-clad fans already lined up outside the stadium. "This just shows how much people truly care," Nakamura said. "It's not about football players looking to give autographs.
NEWS
By Heather Rogers Haverback | March 26, 2011
When I heard that another earthquake had rocked the land near where I had lived and taught in Japan, my heart sank. I could not help but think of all of my kind colleagues, students and friends in that small village. While I am now removed from that portion of the world and that part of my life, my appreciation of the Japanese and their ways remains at my core. Throughout my year of living in a Japanese village on the coast of Toyama, I was referred to daily as a gaijin , or alien.
NEWS
By J.T. Cassidy | March 22, 2011
—When the massive, magnitude-9.0 earthquake that shook Japan to its core hit my neighborhood of Yokohama, 250 miles south of the epicenter, it registered an upper 5 on the shindo scale. Shindo, literally meaning "degree of shaking," is the official seismic intensity scale used in Japan. Ranging from 0 to 7, it factors in a host of tangibles and intangibles — including the sense of fear — as well as more easily observable physical phenomena like falling dishes, cracking walls and toppling structures.
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