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By New York Times News Service | September 14, 1991
TOKYO -- After weeks of government pledges to clean up Japan's scandal-plagued securities markets, a high-level advisory panel rejected the idea yesterday of an independent agency to regulate the industry. It proposed instead that the Ministry of Finance retain its role as overseer.The panel, which presented its recommendations last night to Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu, suggested that the Finance Ministry create a new Securities and Financial Examination Committee, which would function as a kind of Securities and Exchange Commission in Japan.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 30, 1991
I CAME to buy a Christmas gift for my daughter, but she wants everything, moaned Emiko Endo as she trailed her 2-year-old through the isles of a Toys-R-Us store. Sound familiar? The lament echoed with a wonderful resonance across the Pacific Ocean because Endo, along with 17,000 other Japanese consumers jammed the first Toys-R-Us store in Japan on opening day. The world's largest toy retailer made its debut in a Tokyo suburb one Friday before Christmas and rang up weekend sales that broke all grand store opening sales records of the Paramus, N.J.-based company.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | December 5, 1999
IT WASN'T long ago that investors turned their backs on Japan.Who could blame them? The world's second-largest economy was mired in recession, its banking system foundered with billions in bad loans, and the Japanese government seemed apathetic to taking steps to pull the country from its morass.Many of the problems still exist, but investors, who have held fast to mutual funds that invest in the country, are suddenly finding themselves far richer.The reason? Japan as an investment has suddenly gotten hot. Funds that invest in Japan are up 104.72 percent as of Nov. 26, according to Lipper Inc., a New York-based firm that tracks the performance of mutual funds.
NEWS
By Thi Lam | November 14, 1995
PUBLIC OUTRAGE over the rape of an Okinawa school girl by a United States serviceman may finally push the Japanese toward remilitarization, ending 50 years of ''splendid isolation'' under the U.S. nuclear umbrella. Despite nascent Asian fears of renewed Japanese expansionism, Japan's remilitarization would greatly enhance the security prospects of the Asia-Pacific region.For decades Japan, like Germany, has basked in the generosity of its American conqueror, rising from the ashes of World War II to become an economic superpower.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan has prepared a plan for opening its public-sector construction market for bidding by foreign companies, making it more likely that Washington will not impose trade sanctions on Thursday, a U.S. official said yesterday."
NEWS
April 27, 1991
The gulf conflict has given Japan and Germany a chance to break out of their post-World War II inhibitions against even the most remote and indirect involvement of their military forces overseas.During the U.S.-led arms buildup and attack on Iraq, governments in Bonn and Tokyo were paralyzed, this despite a realization that a more active contribution to the coalition war effort would increase their clout in world affairs. Now that a cease fire prevails in the Persian Gulf, Japan and Germany evidently feel free to set mild interventionist precedents of potential future importance.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 15, 1995
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama of Japan did yesterday what no other Japanese leader has dared to do: He extended his "heartfelt apology" for atrocities his country committed in World War II."In the hope that no such mistake be made in the future, I regard, in a spirit of humility, these irrefutable facts of history, and express here once again my feelings of deep remorse and state my heartfelt apology," Mr. Murayama said.His speech is sure to provoke strident debate throughout the nation, for his words were clearer than those of any other Japanese official trying to address Japan's war role.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | January 16, 1994
TOKYO -- He likes jazz, runs a country and publicly dumps on Japan's lack of international responsibility and its intransigent bureaucracy. Moreover, he wants the English-speaking world to know how he feels.In short, he could be any of a number of national leaders -- which is probably just the point. Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa considers himself part of the outside world. In case that message hasn't gotten out, he has gone beyond what the country's Foreign Ministry says any prime minister has done in memory by publishing an English-language translation of his thoughts while still in office.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leakey | March 10, 1992
With the Japan vs. America battle of words and products going full blast, it's worth noting that Japan's stock market and economy have been on a losing streak.Following a meager 8 percent gain last year, the Japanese stock market is down by a similar percentage in 1992. That traditionally overvalued market is an amazing 45 percent below its peak level in 1989, when the slide began.Meanwhile, the country has lurched into recession as the Bank of Japan has boosted interest rates. It's unlikely to snap out of it until the end of this year, or perhaps 1993.
NEWS
July 10, 1993
Under the political cover of the Group of Seven summit in Tokyo, Russian President Boris Yeltsin may have set the stage for settling one of the most serious foreign policy issues still left over from the Cold War -- the dispute between Japan and Moscow over four islands in the Kurile group seized by Soviet forces in the closing days of World War II.Twice in the past year Mr. Yeltsin had to cancel visits to Japan, to the great annoyance of his prospective hosts,...
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