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NEWS
June 29, 1994
In good times, Japan does not need political leadership. The civil service makes everything work. But Japan is in economic crisis, trying to get out of recession and regain prosperity so Japanese can buy imports and mute American criticism. Japan is facing a run by world money managers from a weak dollar into a stronger yen, making Japanese products expensive to export. Unless action is taken and confidence regained, Japan's recovery will halt. For that, the Japanese do need a government.
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NEWS
By Seth Cropsey | December 3, 1991
ANNIVERSARIES, such as the 50th anniversary of Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, offer an appropriate moment for reflection -- not to rekindle old anger or open aging wounds but to use our knowledge of history to look with increased understanding into the future.Unfortunately, it is especially difficult for the Japanese to take such a look because Japan's educational system refuses to acknowledge the country's behavior in the years leading up to World War II. Absent is a record of the subjugation and slaughter of civilians in China and Korea.
NEWS
August 8, 1993
A major obstacle impeding Japan from taking its place as the leading power in Asian affairs is the heritage of Japanese racism toward neighboring nationalities. This is an especially matter in South Korea and China. That explains Japan's extraordinary admission and 48-years-late apology for forcing thousands of Asian women into prostitution to serve imperial troops in World War II.A government inquiry, prompted by a Korean woman's lawsuit, detailed a massive system of coercing "comfort women" to serve troops between 1932 and 1945.
NEWS
September 8, 1992
Six months ago, American politicians took great delight in bashing Japan. They said Japan's unfair trading practices were responsible for many of America's economic ills. The litany of offenses ranged from dumping automobiles in the United States to closing its markets to American construction companies.In recent weeks, however, the political campaigns have been free of this rhetorical pummeling, thanks to Japan's economic woes. Plummeting land values and share prices on the Tokyo stock market have taken their toll on the economic superpower.
NEWS
By ROBERT RENO | November 4, 1992
A state and culture as old as Japan's does not, in the space of a year, lightly give away the secrets of its historical direction.But the evidence is mounting that, narrowing our vision to the modern era, Japan is, in 1992, undergoing a revolution as fundamental as the Meiji restoration and as consequential as the events of 1945. It was, of course, a perverse coincidence last month that as Japanese military forces moved into Southeast Asia after an absence of 47 years, a Japanese Army officer wrote in Japan's most widely circulated magazine that it was time for a military coup d'etat to restore the confidence of a nation scandalized by corruption in its political system.
NEWS
March 8, 1991
Well, well, well! Now that the fighting in the Persian Gulf is over, Japan comes riding to the rescue, astride a metaphorical white stallion like the one the emperor used to ride, offering $9 billion to help pay for war costs.Mind you, even though Japan gets an irreplaceable share of its petroleum from the Persian Gulf, the country nevertheless didn't send a single soldier or sailor to fight, and, for that matter, sent support groups such as medics only in laughably small numbers. At the outset the Japanese promised to help foot the bill for the operation, but these promises tended to be as evanescent as Japan's promises to lift trade barriers.
NEWS
August 1, 2007
Japanese voters repudiated Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Sunday - and in no uncertain terms - over economic mismanagement. But if it slows down his desire to remilitarize Japan, that can only be a good consequence. The ruling Liberal Democratic Party lost control of the upper house of parliament, and the opposition Democratic Party of Japan is foursquare against Mr. Abe's nationalist tendencies. An immediate result may be the withdrawal of Japanese ships from the Indian Ocean once their authorization expires in November.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | June 8, 1993
TOKYO -- Japan's foreign minister said this morning that Tokyo "cannot accept" the Clinton administration's new proposals for opening Japanese markets to more imports.The proposal amounts to a form of "managed trade," Foreign Minister Kabun Muto told reporters within hours after the Washington news media received their first briefings on the plan. Tokyo is 13 hours ahead of Washington.Japanese officials have been denouncing "managed trade" for more than two months in a public-relations drive aimed at countering the long-anticipated Clinton administration package.
NEWS
By Robert Warren Barnett | October 9, 1990
AMERICAN ''Japan Bashers,'' supposing Tokyo to be more vulnerable to Iraqi domination of OPEC than Washington, are demanding angrily that Japan should contribute many, many billions of dollars to cover a far greater share of the financial and military burdens bravely borne by Washington. Many bashers say that if a greedy Japan continues to be a free-riding beneficiary of the risk-taking sacrifices of others we should revoke our Alliance and impose prohibitive trade barriers.Meanwhile, careful Japanese analysts tell us privately -- we also read of it in the Times -- that the Liberal Democratic Party leadership incredulously digests this most recent Gulf-related cacophony of lamentation, self-pity and savage abuse of Japan voiced by Americans blind to Japan's present strategic benevolences.
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