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Janis Joplin

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By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 23, 2013
Last Sunday, I dug deep in my wardrobe to put together the right outfit for a special event. I came up with a green, flared, multi-layered T-strapped top; stone-washed bell bottoms; dangling earrings; bangles; and denim wedge-heeled shoes. With my hair in a naturally, curly state and wearing big sunglasses, I was ready. When I walked into the Arena Stage Theatre in D.C., I saw a couple of other people with 1960-ish outfits as we filed down the stairs, drinks in hand, in anticipation of "One Night With Janis Joplin.
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NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | July 23, 2013
Last Sunday, I dug deep in my wardrobe to put together the right outfit for a special event. I came up with a green, flared, multi-layered T-strapped top; stone-washed bell bottoms; dangling earrings; bangles; and denim wedge-heeled shoes. With my hair in a naturally, curly state and wearing big sunglasses, I was ready. When I walked into the Arena Stage Theatre in D.C., I saw a couple of other people with 1960-ish outfits as we filed down the stairs, drinks in hand, in anticipation of "One Night With Janis Joplin.
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FEATURES
By New York Times | December 18, 1991
Seattle -- FOUR MONTHS after a play based on the life of singer Janis Joplin was closed because of a lawsuit by the Joplin estate, a federal judge here has ruled that the production is a protected form of free speech.The ruling, by Judge John C. Coughenour of U.S. District Court in Seattle, is one of the few nationwide in which a court has tried to define the commercial rights of a celebrity's estate.Joplin, the Texas-born blues and rock artist, died of a heroin overdose in Hollywood in 1970 at 27.Joplin's family, joined by Manny Fox, a New York producer who owns the rights to make a film and play based on her life, asserted that the Seattle theater company could not stage the play "Janis" without permission of the estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee | April 24, 2013
You never get into an argument with a Latin woman! In the final night of the battle rounds, the coaches watched the final performances, made their final steals, and completed their teams.  In just one hour, the competition heats up with the judges selecting only the best to move on to the knock out rounds. Team Shakira: Brandon Roush vs. Shawna P. "Piece of My Heart," Janis Joplin It was the battle between youth vs. experience as special needs counselor Brandon Roush faced vintage rock goddess Shawna P. With both being very intense singers, their rendition of Janis Joplin's “Piece of My Heart” surprised the coaches with the amazing chemistry (and Shawna's ability to make everyone feel that it was indeed Ms. Joplin on stage.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Los Angeles Times | June 13, 2004
If members of the Woodstock generation don't already feel like museum pieces, this week they they'll have a new reason to do so. On Saturday, the New York State Museum in Albany will unveil a 35th anniversary exhibition exploring the celebrated "three days of peace, love and music" that took place in and around Woodstock, N.Y., in August 1969. The centerpiece will be "Spirit of the Woodstock Generation: The Photographs of Elliott Landy," featuring images captured by one of the festival's two official photographers.
NEWS
By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
"Beneath the Diamond Sky," by Barney Hoskyns. Simon & Schuster. 221 pages. $30.When discussing politics and history, one needs to establish some credentials, and so to clear the deck in this department, I should say that I come to reading "Beneath the Diamond Sky" as someone who graduated from Berkeley in 1967. I remember, for instance, going to Oakland in these years to sell a motorcycle to the Hell's Angels, who were then living in a house with the Jefferson Airplane, and part of the negotiation, as I recall, had to do with the Angels taking out a baggy of pills, of unknown identity, and passing them around.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | September 27, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Janis Joplin got the feature-film treatment in the fictionalized "The Rose" (1979). Jim Morrison's life will be dramatized in Oliver Stone's upcoming movie about The Doors. But a feature film about legendary rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix -- who died in 1970 at 27 -- is still without voltage.Alan Douglas, who supervises the production of the Hendrix music catalogs and related merchandising (including the upcoming concert video of Hendrix's last major concert at the Isle of Wight Festival)
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2006
Winters Lane Productions' lively production of Beehive The 60s Musical celebrates a decade of early rock 'n' roll through the divas who defined it. Writer/director Larry Gallagher's creation debuted in 1985, and at Chesapeake Art Center's intimate Studio Theatre, six women have taken on the challenge of transforming into pop princesses and rock queens to sing and dance through 40 songs. The revue recalls the profound changes of the tumultuous decade defined by the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War and drugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tionah Lee | April 24, 2013
You never get into an argument with a Latin woman! In the final night of the battle rounds, the coaches watched the final performances, made their final steals, and completed their teams.  In just one hour, the competition heats up with the judges selecting only the best to move on to the knock out rounds. Team Shakira: Brandon Roush vs. Shawna P. "Piece of My Heart," Janis Joplin It was the battle between youth vs. experience as special needs counselor Brandon Roush faced vintage rock goddess Shawna P. With both being very intense singers, their rendition of Janis Joplin's “Piece of My Heart” surprised the coaches with the amazing chemistry (and Shawna's ability to make everyone feel that it was indeed Ms. Joplin on stage.)
FEATURES
By Pat H. Broeske and Pat H. Broeske,THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER | January 4, 1999
An indelible icon of the '60s, Janis Joplin chugged Southern Comfort on stage, had affairs with women and men and cruised the streets of Los Angeles in a Porsche 365 Cabriolet painted in a far-out psychedelic design.But the free-spirited blues empress, who died of a heroin overdose at age 27, also talked hopefully of marriage, babies and a home, complete with traditional white-picket fence.No wonder nearly three decades later she remains such a dichotomy -- and her story continues to tantalize Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | May 15, 2008
At card parties that my family and neighbors threw during the Arkansas summers nights of my childhood, there was one artist whose music always solicited shouts throughout the room: Bobby Womack. Sometimes, the loud card game - which always became heated as expletives flew through the smoky air - stopped completely. "Turn that Bobby Womack record up!" my aunt Phyl would command. "I gotta hear this. Stop the game, y'all." The participants didn't seem to mind as everybody sang along to the record on the old hi-fi: If you get anything out of life/You got to put up with the toils and strife ... Eventually, the bid whist game and loud cussing would resume.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | June 11, 2006
MONTEREY POP and JIMI PLAYS MONTEREY & SHAKE! OTIS AT MONTEREY -- Criterion -- $29.95 each It's almost impossible not to shed a tear while watching Monterey Pop, D.A. Pennebaker's transcendent celebration of the 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival. The festival itself, spread over three northern California days, was the first and the truest manifestation of what would become known as the Summer of Love, and that alone can make watching the film an emotional experience - a recollection of lost innocence for those of a certain age. If the spirit of the times alone doesn't get to you, then maybe the music will.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 12, 2006
Winters Lane Productions' lively production of Beehive The 60s Musical celebrates a decade of early rock 'n' roll through the divas who defined it. Writer/director Larry Gallagher's creation debuted in 1985, and at Chesapeake Art Center's intimate Studio Theatre, six women have taken on the challenge of transforming into pop princesses and rock queens to sing and dance through 40 songs. The revue recalls the profound changes of the tumultuous decade defined by the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War and drugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2005
During the late '60s and early '70s, late-night TV audiences were divided into two camps: The more conservative and traditional entertainment-oriented gravitated to NBC's The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson, and the younger and hipper tuned in and turned on to ABC's The Dick Cavett Show. Ironically, Cavett, a sophisticated Yale-educated stand-up comic, admits in an interview on the nostalgic, entertaining DVD set The Dick Cavett Show: Rock Icons (Shout, $40) that he didn't know much about rock music when the likes of Jefferson Airplane and Janis Joplin began to appear on his show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Los Angeles Times | June 13, 2004
If members of the Woodstock generation don't already feel like museum pieces, this week they they'll have a new reason to do so. On Saturday, the New York State Museum in Albany will unveil a 35th anniversary exhibition exploring the celebrated "three days of peace, love and music" that took place in and around Woodstock, N.Y., in August 1969. The centerpiece will be "Spirit of the Woodstock Generation: The Photographs of Elliott Landy," featuring images captured by one of the festival's two official photographers.
FEATURES
By Pat H. Broeske and Pat H. Broeske,THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER | January 4, 1999
An indelible icon of the '60s, Janis Joplin chugged Southern Comfort on stage, had affairs with women and men and cruised the streets of Los Angeles in a Porsche 365 Cabriolet painted in a far-out psychedelic design.But the free-spirited blues empress, who died of a heroin overdose at age 27, also talked hopefully of marriage, babies and a home, complete with traditional white-picket fence.No wonder nearly three decades later she remains such a dichotomy -- and her story continues to tantalize Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | June 11, 2006
MONTEREY POP and JIMI PLAYS MONTEREY & SHAKE! OTIS AT MONTEREY -- Criterion -- $29.95 each It's almost impossible not to shed a tear while watching Monterey Pop, D.A. Pennebaker's transcendent celebration of the 1967 Monterey International Pop Festival. The festival itself, spread over three northern California days, was the first and the truest manifestation of what would become known as the Summer of Love, and that alone can make watching the film an emotional experience - a recollection of lost innocence for those of a certain age. If the spirit of the times alone doesn't get to you, then maybe the music will.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 25, 2005
During the late '60s and early '70s, late-night TV audiences were divided into two camps: The more conservative and traditional entertainment-oriented gravitated to NBC's The Tonight Show With Johnny Carson, and the younger and hipper tuned in and turned on to ABC's The Dick Cavett Show. Ironically, Cavett, a sophisticated Yale-educated stand-up comic, admits in an interview on the nostalgic, entertaining DVD set The Dick Cavett Show: Rock Icons (Shout, $40) that he didn't know much about rock music when the likes of Jefferson Airplane and Janis Joplin began to appear on his show.
NEWS
By Craig Nova and Craig Nova,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 7, 1997
"Beneath the Diamond Sky," by Barney Hoskyns. Simon & Schuster. 221 pages. $30.When discussing politics and history, one needs to establish some credentials, and so to clear the deck in this department, I should say that I come to reading "Beneath the Diamond Sky" as someone who graduated from Berkeley in 1967. I remember, for instance, going to Oakland in these years to sell a motorcycle to the Hell's Angels, who were then living in a house with the Jefferson Airplane, and part of the negotiation, as I recall, had to do with the Angels taking out a baggy of pills, of unknown identity, and passing them around.
NEWS
By Ann G. Sjoerdsma | October 4, 1992
LOVE, JANIS.Laura Joplin.Villard Books.342 pages. $22.50. For two years, while she searched for her rock and roll soul, Janis Joplin wrote wonderfully vibrant, funny, smart, tender letters to her skeptical parents and younger brother and sister back in Port Arthur, Texas. She gushed about music, clothes and boyfriends, her hippie lifestyle, her dog, her dreams and insecurities. The plain-faced girl who never thought she was good enough desperately wanted her family's approval.June 6, 1966, from psychedelic Haight-Ashbury, San Francisco: Mother & Dad . . . I'm sure you're both convinced my self-destructive streak has won out again but I'm really trying.
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