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By Robert Hilson and Robert Hilson,STAFF WRITER | April 15, 1996
C William G. Janik Sr., a plumber and pipefitter at the Maryland Institute, College of Art who taught himself to craft unique sculptures using copper tubing, died Tuesday of leukemia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a long illness. He was 67.Soon after he began work at the school in 1983, Mr. Janik began making sculptures similar to the ones he saw in the studios."He always took the position that he could do it as well as we could do it," said John Ferguson, the physical plant manager at the institute.
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SPORTS
By K.C. Johnson and K.C. Johnson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 12, 2008
BEIJING - It's while consuming my post-midnight "training" snack of hops and barley that the realization strikes: It's time to stop spectating and start competing. Time to channel my inner Kobe and enter the fray. Time, of course, to visit this city's famous Silk Market. The Silk Market is a six-floor shopping center where the games away from the Games occur. It's where the competitive - and often physical - sport known as bargaining plays out with alternately smiling and pushy clerks, who grab you to give a "special price for a special friend" on everything from (fake)
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NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1995
Edmund Janik doesn't know what to do, but he's going to keep trying.The Pasadena man, who spent his life savings building an assisted-care home for senior citizens, wants to expand the living quarters to accommodate 15 people.The problem, he says, is that every time he tries to fulfill the county's requirements, officials add to their demands."I ask people from the permit office to come," Mr. Janik said. "The county, they look for more and more and more."Mr. Janik and his wife, Eugena, are frustrated, and so is the county.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
On January 8, 2004, DR. THOMAS J. USTACH, M.D. He was a graduate of Johns Hopkins in 1957 and had a fellow- ship at the same hospital from 1967 to 1969. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth Ann Ustach (nee Janik), loving father of four children and four grandchildren. Memorial service will be held Wednesday, January 14, at Our Lady of Fatima, Modesto, CA.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 10, 2002
A man in the 3000 block of E. Monument St. was shot three times last night and died of his wounds less than two hours later at Johns Hopkins Hospital, city police said. Police responded to several calls about 9:25 p.m. and found the man, who had been shot in the stomach, buttocks and ankle. The man was wearing a bulletproof vest and had a handgun, city police Sgt. Eric Janik said. Police would not release the victim's name, age or residence. Shells from a semiautomatic handgun were on the street, Janik said.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
Two Pasadena men who could be neighbors are taking their squabble over setbacks and house sizes back to the county zoning official who already told them to resolve their differences.On Jan. 2, Robert C. Wilcox, the administrative hearing officer, ordered Edmund Janik and Wilbur Martindale to compromise in their fight over Janik's plan to build a 46-foot by 28-foot Cape Cod-style home on a 75-foot-long lot in the 7600 block of Laurel Drive, near Stony Creek in Pine Haven.Martindale, who lives on the adjacent lot, opposes the project, arguing that the property is too small for such a large building and that the house would impair his enjoyment of the water.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | April 21, 1995
Edmund Janik fears his American dream is evaporating.The Polish immigrant and his wife moved to the United States 13 years ago. They worked long hours and saved for seven years to build a home for the elderly in Pasadena. But they can't get a permit to operate it the way they planned."I am really disgusted," said Mr. Janik, sitting in the ornately decorated senior home. "My wife is talking about selling this property and go back to Poland."Mr. Janik charges that county officials changed the rules after he built the eight-bedroom house, but before he could open it. But county permit officials say Mr. Janik applied for the wrong type of building permit.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
On January 8, 2004, DR. THOMAS J. USTACH, M.D. He was a graduate of Johns Hopkins in 1957 and had a fellow- ship at the same hospital from 1967 to 1969. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth Ann Ustach (nee Janik), loving father of four children and four grandchildren. Memorial service will be held Wednesday, January 14, at Our Lady of Fatima, Modesto, CA.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | April 12, 1992
Is your for-sale home suffering the shopworn syndrome?Has the demand for showings dropped off drastically? Are telephone inquiries few? Has your agent stopped calling you back? Shopworn syndrome typically sets in two to six months after a property is put on the market and is a serious malady if allowed to go untreated, warns Carolyn Janik, author of several books on real estate."If your house has been hanging around the market for several months, you've got to find a way to renew interest or it may take longer and longer to sell and you'll get less and less money in the end," Ms. Janik says.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 13, 2002
THE TOP lawyer for the nation's 800,000-plus members of the National Association of Realtors has just issued an unusual warning to real estate brokers: Be careful if you charge home sellers or buyers any extra fees beyond your standard commission. You could be inviting trouble from the federal government or private lawsuits. Laurie Janik, general counsel for the trade group, said the growing number of brokerages that charge extra fees - typically ranging from $250 to $595 - may draw "unwanted attention" from federal regulators and consumers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 10, 2002
A man in the 3000 block of E. Monument St. was shot three times last night and died of his wounds less than two hours later at Johns Hopkins Hospital, city police said. Police responded to several calls about 9:25 p.m. and found the man, who had been shot in the stomach, buttocks and ankle. The man was wearing a bulletproof vest and had a handgun, city police Sgt. Eric Janik said. Police would not release the victim's name, age or residence. Shells from a semiautomatic handgun were on the street, Janik said.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 13, 2002
THE TOP lawyer for the nation's 800,000-plus members of the National Association of Realtors has just issued an unusual warning to real estate brokers: Be careful if you charge home sellers or buyers any extra fees beyond your standard commission. You could be inviting trouble from the federal government or private lawsuits. Laurie Janik, general counsel for the trade group, said the growing number of brokerages that charge extra fees - typically ranging from $250 to $595 - may draw "unwanted attention" from federal regulators and consumers.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
Two Pasadena men who could be neighbors are taking their squabble over setbacks and house sizes back to the county zoning official who already told them to resolve their differences.On Jan. 2, Robert C. Wilcox, the administrative hearing officer, ordered Edmund Janik and Wilbur Martindale to compromise in their fight over Janik's plan to build a 46-foot by 28-foot Cape Cod-style home on a 75-foot-long lot in the 7600 block of Laurel Drive, near Stony Creek in Pine Haven.Martindale, who lives on the adjacent lot, opposes the project, arguing that the property is too small for such a large building and that the house would impair his enjoyment of the water.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson and Robert Hilson,STAFF WRITER | April 15, 1996
C William G. Janik Sr., a plumber and pipefitter at the Maryland Institute, College of Art who taught himself to craft unique sculptures using copper tubing, died Tuesday of leukemia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after a long illness. He was 67.Soon after he began work at the school in 1983, Mr. Janik began making sculptures similar to the ones he saw in the studios."He always took the position that he could do it as well as we could do it," said John Ferguson, the physical plant manager at the institute.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | June 16, 1995
Edmund Janik doesn't know what to do, but he's going to keep trying.The Pasadena man, who spent his life savings building an assisted-care home for senior citizens, wants to expand the living quarters to accommodate 15 people.The problem, he says, is that every time he tries to fulfill the county's requirements, officials add to their demands."I ask people from the permit office to come," Mr. Janik said. "The county, they look for more and more and more."Mr. Janik and his wife, Eugena, are frustrated, and so is the county.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | April 21, 1995
Edmund Janik fears his American dream is evaporating.The Polish immigrant and his wife moved to the United States 13 years ago. They worked long hours and saved for seven years to build a home for the elderly in Pasadena. But they can't get a permit to operate it the way they planned."I am really disgusted," said Mr. Janik, sitting in the ornately decorated senior home. "My wife is talking about selling this property and go back to Poland."Mr. Janik charges that county officials changed the rules after he built the eight-bedroom house, but before he could open it. But county permit officials say Mr. Janik applied for the wrong type of building permit.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | September 6, 1992
The house was an elegantly appointed Cape Cod in Clarksville with a Waterford crystal chandelier in the foyer, a cedar shake roof and professional landscaping. And it sold in just one day.Did it help that the listing agent, Pamela Shaw of Coldwell Banker, was so enamored of the house she would have bought it herself? That's a real possibility, realty specialists say."If you like a house yourself, you're going to be more excited about selling it than if you think it's a dog," says Gaye Rittenhouse, a sales associate with the Century 21 chain in Catonsville.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | October 25, 1992
Many Maryland homeowners are stumped.On the one hand, they could take advantage of low mortgage rates to refinance. On the other, they could use the low rates to buy a better home.A Columbia couple in their early 30s -- she's a sales executive with Xerox, and he's a human resources specialist for Procter & Gamble -- have been in this quandary for four months. They're torn between refinancing and selling their contemporary town house in favor of a home with a bigger yard where their 2-year-old boy could frolic.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | March 21, 1993
Year after year, Carolyn Janik planned to spend the $5,000 it will cost to replace the thoroughly matted garnet carpet in her ranch home. But, year after year, she decided to spend the money on a vacation instead.Now that she intends to sell and knows she must replace the carpet, she's struck by the injustice of it all. Why should the next owner get the benefit of improvements she might have enjoyed?"Oh, how I don't want to spend this money!" she exclaims.Ms. Janik is a real estate specialist and author.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | December 13, 1992
She's 31 years old, a manager at a fitness club and an "independent" woman. But when she and her husband bought a Canton town house, she surrendered the mortgage decisions to her husband."
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