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By Michael Muskal and Michael Muskal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2004
Janet Leigh, the actress who turned the mundane act of taking a shower into one of cinema's most enduring images of gore and horror, died Sunday with her family at her bedside. She was 77. The actress' husband, Robert Brandt, and her actress daughters Kelly and Jamie Lee Curtis, were at Leigh's side when she died in Beverly Hills. Leigh had suffered from vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels, for the past year. "She died peacefully at home," said Heidi Schaeffer, a spokeswoman for Jamie Lee Curtis.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 10, 2004
She made 62 other movies, and in none of them was she stabbed repeatedly while taking a shower. Janet Leigh, who died last week at 77, will go down in film history for one role only -- in reality, for one scene, the 45 seconds she spent getting knifed by Anthony Perkins' deranged mama's boy in Psycho (1960). It is, admittedly, one incredible scene, a tour de force of quick-cut editing by director Alfred Hitchcock that set the template for every damsel-in-distress scene in every horror film made for the next 44 years (and counting)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
It's the truth -- Janet Leigh really hasn't taken a shower since seeing herself in "Psycho" nearly four decades ago."It wasn't shooting the scene," says Leigh, whose character's death at the hands of the knife-wielding Norman Bates helped ingrain Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 masterpiece into the national psyche. "But I never realized before how completely vulnerable we are. Seeing the movie and seeing how defenseless one is -- you can't see, the curtain's shut; you can't hear, the water's running.
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By Michael Muskal and Michael Muskal,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2004
Janet Leigh, the actress who turned the mundane act of taking a shower into one of cinema's most enduring images of gore and horror, died Sunday with her family at her bedside. She was 77. The actress' husband, Robert Brandt, and her actress daughters Kelly and Jamie Lee Curtis, were at Leigh's side when she died in Beverly Hills. Leigh had suffered from vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels, for the past year. "She died peacefully at home," said Heidi Schaeffer, a spokeswoman for Jamie Lee Curtis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 10, 2004
She made 62 other movies, and in none of them was she stabbed repeatedly while taking a shower. Janet Leigh, who died last week at 77, will go down in film history for one role only -- in reality, for one scene, the 45 seconds she spent getting knifed by Anthony Perkins' deranged mama's boy in Psycho (1960). It is, admittedly, one incredible scene, a tour de force of quick-cut editing by director Alfred Hitchcock that set the template for every damsel-in-distress scene in every horror film made for the next 44 years (and counting)
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By Holly Selby | December 17, 2000
Looking for art that's simultaneously familiar and -- not? Works in glass by Baltimore artist John Ellsberry may fit the bill. His images of figures from American pop culture -- Elizabeth Taylor, Edgar Allan Poe, Janet Leigh, Billie Holiday -- are on display through Jan. 6 in "John Ellsberry, Glass Mosaic Images," at the Galerie Francoise. Using bits of glass, glue and board, the artist creates works that from afar are instantly recognizable as portraits, but when viewed close up become fragmented abstractions.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
While Orson Welles was editing "Touch of Evil," he left to film a movie in Europe. In his absence, Universal Pictures re-cut the picture and, although Welles wrote the studio an impassioned 58-page memo with his detailed instructions as to how the film should be edited, the "Touch of Evil" that was released in 1958 was Universal's version, not Welles'.That injustice -- one of the most storied in film history -- has been redressed in this, the fourth version of "Touch of Evil," which has been re-edited to the specifications laid out in Welles' memo.
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By Rasmi Simhan | July 27, 2000
Classic Filmfest 2000 Meet the people who made suspense, sci-fi and horror all too real this weekend at Classic Filmfest 2000 in Arlington, Va. Actors such as Janet Leigh ("Psycho") and Kevin McCarthy ("Invasion of the Body Snatchers") will discuss the films that made them stars. The cult-film convention includes an awards ceremony for classic films and screenings of new flicks such as "Attack of the Bat Monster." Vendors will sell posters, magazines, films and memorabilia. The film festival runs tomorrow through Sunday at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway in Arlington, Va. Daily passes $20 at door.
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By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,New York Times News Service | May 31, 1995
It has been more than 35 years since Janet Leigh saw herself on screen in Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror film, "Psycho." After viewing the famous shower scene in which she was repeatedly stabbed, Ms. Leigh was seized with an overwhelming -- and lasting -- terror."
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By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Out on Vailthorn Road in Middle River, they were praying for a number.Through fear and anger and tears, Bill and Faye Swann asked: Please, let them give Janet a jail term numbered in years.But on Monday, a Thai court sentenced Janet Leigh Dettler to death for trying to smuggle about 16 pounds of heroin out of Bangkok, later commuting the punishment to life in prison, an official at the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok said last night.If she had received 25 or 50 years, Dettler might have been released after serving 10. With a life sentence, that is unlikely.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby | December 17, 2000
Looking for art that's simultaneously familiar and -- not? Works in glass by Baltimore artist John Ellsberry may fit the bill. His images of figures from American pop culture -- Elizabeth Taylor, Edgar Allan Poe, Janet Leigh, Billie Holiday -- are on display through Jan. 6 in "John Ellsberry, Glass Mosaic Images," at the Galerie Francoise. Using bits of glass, glue and board, the artist creates works that from afar are instantly recognizable as portraits, but when viewed close up become fragmented abstractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasmi Simhan | July 27, 2000
Classic Filmfest 2000 Meet the people who made suspense, sci-fi and horror all too real this weekend at Classic Filmfest 2000 in Arlington, Va. Actors such as Janet Leigh ("Psycho") and Kevin McCarthy ("Invasion of the Body Snatchers") will discuss the films that made them stars. The cult-film convention includes an awards ceremony for classic films and screenings of new flicks such as "Attack of the Bat Monster." Vendors will sell posters, magazines, films and memorabilia. The film festival runs tomorrow through Sunday at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway in Arlington, Va. Daily passes $20 at door.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 2, 1998
While Orson Welles was editing "Touch of Evil," he left to film a movie in Europe. In his absence, Universal Pictures re-cut the picture and, although Welles wrote the studio an impassioned 58-page memo with his detailed instructions as to how the film should be edited, the "Touch of Evil" that was released in 1958 was Universal's version, not Welles'.That injustice -- one of the most storied in film history -- has been redressed in this, the fourth version of "Touch of Evil," which has been re-edited to the specifications laid out in Welles' memo.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
It's the truth -- Janet Leigh really hasn't taken a shower since seeing herself in "Psycho" nearly four decades ago."It wasn't shooting the scene," says Leigh, whose character's death at the hands of the knife-wielding Norman Bates helped ingrain Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 masterpiece into the national psyche. "But I never realized before how completely vulnerable we are. Seeing the movie and seeing how defenseless one is -- you can't see, the curtain's shut; you can't hear, the water's running.
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By Bernard Weinraub and Bernard Weinraub,New York Times News Service | May 31, 1995
It has been more than 35 years since Janet Leigh saw herself on screen in Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror film, "Psycho." After viewing the famous shower scene in which she was repeatedly stabbed, Ms. Leigh was seized with an overwhelming -- and lasting -- terror."
NEWS
October 21, 1993
Hapless drug courier lucky to be aliveHaving recently returned from vacation in Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, I was saddened by the story of Janet Leigh Dettler, the 30-year old Baltimorean sentenced to life in a Thai prison.However, she is lucky. In that part of the world the penalty for drug dealing usually is death.Before we rush out the petitions or accuse Thailand and other Southeast Asian nations of excessive punishment, it should be mentioned that all visitors are warned before and during their stay of the penalty for drug trafficking.
NEWS
October 21, 1993
Hapless drug courier lucky to be aliveHaving recently returned from vacation in Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand, I was saddened by the story of Janet Leigh Dettler, the 30-year old Baltimorean sentenced to life in a Thai prison.However, she is lucky. In that part of the world the penalty for drug dealing usually is death.Before we rush out the petitions or accuse Thailand and other Southeast Asian nations of excessive punishment, it should be mentioned that all visitors are warned before and during their stay of the penalty for drug trafficking.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | May 7, 1998
Starting Friday, the Senator Theatre will run a weeklong series of films from the Library of Congress' National Film Registry. Opening night will feature an 8 p.m. screening of Orson Welles' classic "Touch of Evil" (1958), starring Charlton Heston and Janet Leigh as a honeymooning couple caught in a nightmarish web of corruption in a Mexican border town, preceded by Bugs Bunny in the 1957 cartoon "What's Opera, Doc?" The films will be introduced by cinematographer Allen Daviau.Twenty-five more films will be shown throughout the week, including Gordon Parks' "The Learning Tree," John Huston's rarely seen documentary "The Battle of San Pietro," F.W. Murnau's "Sunrise," the labor documentary "Salt of the Earth" and "The Searchers."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | October 14, 1993
Out on Vailthorn Road in Middle River, they were praying for a number.Through fear and anger and tears, Bill and Faye Swann asked: Please, let them give Janet a jail term numbered in years.But on Monday, a Thai court sentenced Janet Leigh Dettler to death for trying to smuggle about 16 pounds of heroin out of Bangkok, later commuting the punishment to life in prison, an official at the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok said last night.If she had received 25 or 50 years, Dettler might have been released after serving 10. With a life sentence, that is unlikely.
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